Currently viewing the category: "Metallic Borer Beetles"
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Emerald Ash Borer
Dear Bugman
Thanks for making Emerald Ash Borer the bug of the month. This will help folks learn more about this pest and maybe discover new sites where it has become established and report them. Attached is an old photo of them mating and a good close up shot. Remember-Don’t Move Infested Wood! Keep up the good work
Brian Sullivan
Plant Health Safeguarding Specialist

Hi again Brian,
Thanks for sending us another wonderful image to better help our readers identify the Emerald Ash Borers.

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Tamamushi
I just found out about your site, and thought for sure I could stump you. I browsed through pages 1, 2, 3… 11 of beetles, and just when I thought I was home free, there it was on page 12. Wish I had found your site a few months sooner. Well, here’s another picture of a Tamamushi, found in Aichi prefecture, Japan. It was laying on the side of the road, deceased I believe. You can make out an ant sitting on top of it. Keep up the good work,
Steven

Hi Steven,
It is actually quite easy to stump us, but thankfully we have several certified experts to assist us when we are in a bind. Your Japanese Buprestid, or Metallic Wood Boring Beetle, is quite beautiful. Despite being dead, the Tamamushi is still a stunning specimen.

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Bug from Japan
Dear bug guys,
I simply adore the site, nice work! I am an English teacher in Fukushima, Japan (a few hours north of Tokyo) and have been fond of insects since infancy. I have made quite a hobby of photographing them over the years. Although colorful and interesting bugs are few and far between here on the island of Honshu, I was lucky enough to spot this little guy on the fringes of a fruit tree orchard on my walk to work last September. It took some detective work to find its official name on the Internet, but I’m pretty sure it’s a Chrysochroa fulgidissima. The Japanese call it a “Tamamushi” and I’m told they are hard to find. My fellow teachers were impressed I got a photo of one. Since you’re having trouble with attachments, here are links to the two pictures I took, as well as a link to the Japanese article about the bug. Enjoy, and keep up the good work!
(the) Brian Adler

Hi Brian,
Thank you for thinking to send your gorgeous image of this Japanese Buprestid, one the the Metallic Wood Boring Beetles, as a link and not an attachment. Tamamushi is a beatiful specimen.

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Emerald Ash Borer
Dear bugman,
This is in response to the folks from Ohio that sent in a photo of the 6 Spotted Tiger Beetle. I’m glad Bruce does recognize its not EAB but I have attached photos I took in the past that might help people ID Emerald Ash Borer (Agrilus planipennis) if they think they have found it. Note the D shaped exit hole.They will be emerging in early June and ending about mid July. Your readers may find the attached website of use and report these pests if found in new areas. http://www.aphis.usda.gov/newsroom/hot_issues/emerald_ash_borer/emerald_ash_borer.shtml Keep up the good work
Brian

Hi Brian,
Thank you ever so much for providing us with a photo and information. We will try to remember to repost your letter on our homepage in June.

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Golden Buprestid
Dear Bugman,
My wife found a Golden Buprestid in our bedroom the morning of Mar. 20 here in Eugene, OR. We have no idea how it got there. A photo of it posing on an orange leaf is attached. Your website provided the correct identification. Thanks very much!
Donald Gudehus

Hi Donald,
Thank you for sending in your lovely image of a Golden Buprestid. We have gotten several reports lately of Golden Buprestids emerging from milled wood.

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Insects that hatch in houses in winter
Dear Bugman,
For an “art project” your marvelous site is very helpful to naturalists who get asked, what’s this bug that hatched in my house this winter? I’m pasting in 2 photos for you. The first is of a Golden Buprestid (I think) that came right out of my friend Sandy’s cutting board one morning. She’d had that home-made board (probably Ponderosa pine), for 8 years, and pounded, carved, sliced n’ diced on it all that time. Then one recent morning out came this beauty! The 2nd photo is of a Swallowtail butterfly that hatched out on some potted plants in a windowsill in the building here in Moscow, Idaho, where I go for my massage appointments (lucky me). My questions are — have you got any great tales of the long-lived Buprestid larvae popping out as adults in people’s homes? For the Swallowtail, how would a pupa end up on a geranium that’s never been outside? And lastly, what do we tell people who want to feed or keep alive their unexpected and stunningly beautiful winter visitors? The Swallowtail died within the week. The Buprestid has been in a little cage with some fir needles and has made it for a week so far. Thanks for your replies!
Sarah Walker
Moscow, Idaho

Hi Sarah,
Thank you for sending your interesting anecdotes. We have heard of certain wood boring beetles emerging many years after the wood was cut. Sometimes they emerge from furniture and other times from wood paneling. Many caterpillars leave their host plant and wander in search of a place to pupate. Sorry, we have no advice on keeping off season guests alive. Eric Eaton wrote in with this information: “Daniel: What a fabulous story about the beetle emerging from the cutting board! It is indeed a “golden buprestid,” Cypriacis aurulenta (formerly Buprestis aurulenta). The record age for one is an adult that emerged from a baseboard(?) in a Canadian building fully 51 years after the building was erected! Why milled lumber forces such an extended life cycle in woodborers is a mystery, at least as far as I know. Normally, the life cycle would be no more than 2-5 years. Eric”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination