Currently viewing the category: "Metallic Borer Beetles"
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Please post…
Good Evening,
Could you possibly post some information on the Emerald Ash Borer as a feature? Their spread and destruction of trees has been all over the news and many people that I know are now killing every green bug they see. The insect population of Wisconsin thanks you!
Sincerely,
Teresa

Hi Teresa,
What a wonderful suggestion. We just returned from a week in Ohio and the Emerald Ash Borer was quite the topic of discussion. We received the following letter earlier in the year and are thrilled to repost it to our homepage.

Emerald Ash Borer
(03/29/2007) Emerald Ash Borer
Dear bugman,
This is in response to the folks from Ohio that sent in a photo of the 6 Spotted Tiger Beetle. I’m glad Bruce does recognize its not EAB but I have attached photos I took in the past that might help people ID Emerald Ash Borer (Agrilus planipennis) if they think they have found it. Note the D shaped exit hole.They will be emerging in early June and ending about mid July. Your readers may find the attached website of use and report these pests if found in new areas. http://www.aphis.usda.gov/newsroom/hot_issues/emerald_ash_borer/emerald_ash_borer.shtml
Keep up the good work
Brian

Hi Brian,
Thank you ever so much for providing us with a photo and information. We will try to remember to repost your letter on our homepage in June.

Another Link
(05/31/2007) link to Emerald Ash Borer doesn’t work, but here’s another one
Daniel and Lisa, Try this link (not sure it has exactly the same info, but…): http://www.aphis.usda.gov/publications/plant_health/content/printable_version/pub_pheab.pdf More bugs! Less email! regards,
Dave Fallow

Hi Dave,
Thanks. We corrected the original link issue as well.

Mating Emerald Ash Borers
(05/31/2007) Emerald Ash Borer
Dear Bugman
Thanks for making Emerald Ash Borer the bug of the month. This will help folks learn more about this pest and maybe discover new sites where it has become established and report them. Attached is an old photo of them mating and a good close up shot. Remember-Don’t Move Infested Wood! Keep up the good work
Brian Sullivan
Plant Health Safeguarding Specialist

Hi again Brian,
Thanks for sending us another wonderful image to better help our readers identify the Emerald Ash Borers.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Emerald Ash Borer
Dear Bugman
Thanks for making Emerald Ash Borer the bug of the month. This will help folks learn more about this pest and maybe discover new sites where it has become established and report them. Attached is an old photo of them mating and a good close up shot. Remember-Don’t Move Infested Wood! Keep up the good work
Brian Sullivan
Plant Health Safeguarding Specialist

Hi again Brian,
Thanks for sending us another wonderful image to better help our readers identify the Emerald Ash Borers.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Tamamushi
I just found out about your site, and thought for sure I could stump you. I browsed through pages 1, 2, 3… 11 of beetles, and just when I thought I was home free, there it was on page 12. Wish I had found your site a few months sooner. Well, here’s another picture of a Tamamushi, found in Aichi prefecture, Japan. It was laying on the side of the road, deceased I believe. You can make out an ant sitting on top of it. Keep up the good work,
Steven

Hi Steven,
It is actually quite easy to stump us, but thankfully we have several certified experts to assist us when we are in a bind. Your Japanese Buprestid, or Metallic Wood Boring Beetle, is quite beautiful. Despite being dead, the Tamamushi is still a stunning specimen.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Bug from Japan
Dear bug guys,
I simply adore the site, nice work! I am an English teacher in Fukushima, Japan (a few hours north of Tokyo) and have been fond of insects since infancy. I have made quite a hobby of photographing them over the years. Although colorful and interesting bugs are few and far between here on the island of Honshu, I was lucky enough to spot this little guy on the fringes of a fruit tree orchard on my walk to work last September. It took some detective work to find its official name on the Internet, but I’m pretty sure it’s a Chrysochroa fulgidissima. The Japanese call it a “Tamamushi” and I’m told they are hard to find. My fellow teachers were impressed I got a photo of one. Since you’re having trouble with attachments, here are links to the two pictures I took, as well as a link to the Japanese article about the bug. Enjoy, and keep up the good work!
(the) Brian Adler

Hi Brian,
Thank you for thinking to send your gorgeous image of this Japanese Buprestid, one the the Metallic Wood Boring Beetles, as a link and not an attachment. Tamamushi is a beatiful specimen.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Emerald Ash Borer
Dear bugman,
This is in response to the folks from Ohio that sent in a photo of the 6 Spotted Tiger Beetle. I’m glad Bruce does recognize its not EAB but I have attached photos I took in the past that might help people ID Emerald Ash Borer (Agrilus planipennis) if they think they have found it. Note the D shaped exit hole.They will be emerging in early June and ending about mid July. Your readers may find the attached website of use and report these pests if found in new areas. http://www.aphis.usda.gov/newsroom/hot_issues/emerald_ash_borer/emerald_ash_borer.shtml Keep up the good work
Brian

Hi Brian,
Thank you ever so much for providing us with a photo and information. We will try to remember to repost your letter on our homepage in June.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Golden Buprestid
Dear Bugman,
My wife found a Golden Buprestid in our bedroom the morning of Mar. 20 here in Eugene, OR. We have no idea how it got there. A photo of it posing on an orange leaf is attached. Your website provided the correct identification. Thanks very much!
Donald Gudehus

Hi Donald,
Thank you for sending in your lovely image of a Golden Buprestid. We have gotten several reports lately of Golden Buprestids emerging from milled wood.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination