Currently viewing the category: "Longhorn Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Bee cricket situation?
Geographic location of the bug:  Lake George NY
Date: 07/01/2019
Time: 08:27 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  So we saw this scenario while on vacation in ny. I guess I just really want to know what’s going on here. It looks almost like they’re trying to mate, which is obviously not the case. I thought the bug underneath was a cricket, but I’m not positive. Anyway, they were on a busy stairwell, so I tried to move them out of the way with my room card. When I touched them, the bee LIFTED the cricket and started flying! They dropped a second later, but the bee lifted his (victim?) as high as my head. I was just wondering if anyone there might know what’s going on. I didn’t think bees attacked other insects like this. I LOVE your site btw and have to tell you that you are the reason I’ve gone from being terrified of insects, to now thinking they’re adorable and picking them up!
Thanks!
How you want your letter signed:  KBH

Bee-Like Robber Fly eats Sawyer

Dear KBH,
Thanks for your kind words, and we are happy to learn our site has helped to alleviate your fear of many insects, though we caution you that many insects should not be handled due to the possibility of stings, bites, urticating hairs and chemical defenses that can cause skin reactions.  We are thrilled with your dramatic Food Chain images, but your speculation about this being a Cricket and a Bee is quite wrong.  Though not a Bee, the predator is a Bee-Like Robber Fly in the genus
Laphria, and we felt up to the challenge of providing you with a species identification.  The most frontal facing of your images shows the beard hair as well as the markings on the abdomen and the leg hairs, so we are very confident that your Bee-Like Robber Fly is Laphria thoracica which is pictured on BugGuide.  According to Wisconsin Butterflies:  “This species has a mainly black mystax with some scattered yellow hairs, and mainly black hairs surrounding the eyes. The thorax is yellow and the abdomen may have a variable amount of yellow hairs on abdominal segments two through four. The yellowish arc of hairs that extend from the anterior of the thorax to below the wing insert, make an obvious field mark that is useful in the field.”  The lateral view you provided shows the “yellowish arc of hairs that extend from the anterior of the thorax to below the wing insert” confirming the species identification.  Large Robber Flies are among the greatest aerial insect predators, and they frequently capture prey on the wing, including insects many times their size.  The prey appears to be a Sawyer Beetle similar to this White Spotted Sawyer pictured on BugGuide.

Bee-Like Robber Fly eats Sawyer

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  bel air md
Date: 06/30/2019
Time: 01:49 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  what is this beetle and what is coming out of its butt?
How you want your letter signed:  Peg

Female Broad-Necked Root Borer

Dear Peg,
In July 2011, we designated the female Broad-Necked Root Borer,
Prionus laticollis, as the Bug of the Month, and we believe enough time has elapsed to select your submission as our Bug of the Month for July 2019.  The ovipositor, an organ used for laying eggs, is protruding from the end of her abdomen.  According to iNaturalist:  “The female is larger than the male, with an ovipositor used to deposit eggs. When the female is laying eggs, she “shivers” and eggs are laid through the ovipositor, positioned down into the soil or under litter, usually in groups of threes and twos, but sometimes ones or fours. After the eggs are laid, the female moves her ovipositor up and down to fill the hole she created. When freshly laid, the eggs are pure white, glistening with moisture, but, after a while, they usually change to a deep yellow. Within a few days, the deep yellow eggs turn to a light washed pink. As the larvae develop inside, the eggs turn ivory in color. The eggs are the size of small grains of rice. When the larvae are hatching, they chew through one of the elongated, pointed sides of the egg. The larvae’s heads are adapted for digging into the soil, and they have strong black mandibles for chewing roots.”

wow… how cool! thanks for your response!
Peg

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this?
Geographic location of the bug:  North Carolina
Date: 06/27/2019
Time: 01:33 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  What is this???
How you want your letter signed:  Signed,

Brown Prionid

This is one of the large Prionid Beetles that appear each summer in many parts of North America.  Your individual is a Brown Prionid, Orthosoma brunneum

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What kind of bug is this?
Geographic location of the bug:  Romania, Paulesti region
Date: 06/29/2019
Time: 10:10 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this near my window. Could you please identify it?
How you want your letter signed:  Andrew S.

Great Capricorn Beetle

Dear Andrew,
This is a Longicorn in the family Cerambycidae, and based on images posted to Beetles from Romania, we originally thought it might be
Monochamus sartor, a member of the genus commonly called Sawyers, but additional research has caused us to rethink that and to conclude that it is more likely a Great Capricorn Beetle, Cerambyx cerdo, a mistake we have made in the past.  The images on iNaturalist were a strong factor in our correction.  According to a pdf from EU Wildlife and Sustainable Farming Project:  “The great capricorn beetle is a large beetle with a thin body and very long antennae which are longer than the body” and “The species is declining across Northern Europe but is still relatively common in South France, Spain and Italy. Nevertheless, even here, the rate of decline is worrying.”

Great Capricorn

Dear Daniel,
Thank you for taking the time to examine the photos, cross-reference the sources and write such a detailed response. I command you for willingly answering the questions of so many out of passion. Your help is much appreciated.
Have a good day,
Andrew

Great Capricorn Beetle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  2 inch beetle Bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Bernardsville NJ
Date: 06/28/2019
Time: 06:33 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Here’s a photo- what is it?
How you want your letter signed:  Nancy

Female Broad Necked Root Borer

Dear Nancy,
This is a female Broad Necked Root Borer,
Prionus laticollis, and what appears to be a stinger is actually an ovipositor, an organ used during the egg laying process.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Identify bug
Geographic location of the bug:  North Richland Hills, Tx
Date: 06/27/2019
Time: 08:57 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Can you identify this bug that was on my back porch?
How you want your letter signed:  David

Cottonwood Borer

Dear David,
This distinctive beetle is a Cottonwood Borer.  Most of our reports come from Texas and Oklahoma.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination