Currently viewing the category: "Longhorn Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What kind of bug is this!?
Geographic location of the bug:  Nebraska
Date: 07/24/2019
Time: 06:48 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I was just curious as to what kind of insect this is?  I live in Plattsmouth, Nebraska.  Never saw onelike this or don’tremember seeing one like this.  Youll see it better with zoom.
How you want your letter signed:  Brandon

Red Headed Ash Borer

Dear Brandon,
The Red Headed Ash Borer,
Neoclytus acuminatus, is a beetle that benefits from protective mimicry because it looks and acts like a stinging wasp.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Small Black/Yellow Beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  San Diego CA 92110
Date: 07/24/2019
Time: 05:59 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I’m trying to identify the following bug. It is about 1/8″ – 3/16″ long, black with hints of yellow, long antenna, and hair. I believe that it latched onto me while I was hiking through an area near a pepper tree and pine tree. I’ve searched the Internet without luck, but not the Dark Web 😉 Thanks!
How you want your letter signed:  RedSect Bug Lover

Longhorned Borer Beetle: Ipochus fasciatus

Dear RedSect Bug Lover,
We hope you are not considering us the Dark Web.  This is a Longhorned Borer Beetle in the family Cerambycidae, and we actually thought we were going to have a much more difficult time identifying it than we had.  We quickly identified it as
Ipochus fasciatus on BugGuide. According to Oxford Academic Group:  “Ipochus fasciatus LeConte apparently has newly, but imperfectly, adapted to feed and oviposit in milk thistle, Silybum marianum (L.) Gaertner, an alien, herbaceous, annual weed in southern California. This polyphagous, native cerambycid previously was known only from woody, perennial host plants.”  Knowing it has adapted to feeding on the invasive Milk Thistle is a good thing.

Daniel,
I was making a joking reference to the Dark Web, since I had such a difficult time finding info on the Ipochus fasciatus on the InterWeb.
I also had a difficult time finding any details on this little guy, but found this passage below about what it likes. We have the Rhus laurina (Laurel Sumac) on our hillside and this must be what attracted it.
Thanks for the ID and Info!
RedSect

Hi again RedSect,
Several of the plants in the list on your attached screenshot are growing in the WTB? gardens, including Laurel Leaf Sumac, Oak, Willow and endangered California Black Walnut.  We will keep an eye out for this diminutive Longhorned Borer Beetle.
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Longhorn Beetle?
Geographic location of the bug:  Northern Virginia
Date: 07/23/2019
Time: 08:26 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this crawling in a stack of lumber in the woods here in Northern Virginia. I thought it might be a type of longhorn beetle, but couldn’t find any that matched the coloring pattern. Any thoughts? Thanks!
How you want your letter signed:  Danny

Six Banded Longhorn

Dear Danny,
This is a Six Banded Longhorn,
Dryobius sexnotatus, and according to BugGuide:  “Uncommon/rare; widely scattered, populations are sparse ; listed as rare or threatened by several states, e.g. considered a SGCN by AR, LA, and VA. “

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What kind of an insect is this?
Geographic location of the bug:  Houston, TX
Date: 07/09/2019
Time: 01:50 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I saw this 6 legged insect on our loading van. I’ve never seen it before and wanted to know what it was. I’m very interested in finding out more. Thank you!
How you want your letter signed:  Your Bug Identified

Cottonwood Borer

This gorgeous beetle is a Cottonwood Borer.  According to Texas A&M The Field Guide to Common Texas Insects:  “Adults are commonly encountered on trunks and branches of cottonwood and willow trees and other host plants during the summer months. Infested mature trees are usually not seriously injured. Larval stages are rarely encountered unless heavily infested young trees are killed or fall over; medically harmless.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Lion beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  South Lake Tahoe, CA
Date: 07/06/2019
Time: 10:48 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found him on the floor of our cabin.
How you want your letter signed:  Andrew

Lion Beetle

Dear Andrew,
You deserve a congratulations for even recognizing that the Lion Beetle,
Ulochaetes leoninus, is a beetle as it much more closely resembles a Bee.  Thanks for sending in your awesome image.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Large Long Brown Beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  Georgia
Date: 07/03/2019
Time: 11:19 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Saw this large guy (over 2 inches long!) chilling on our house. I tried googling him but there are so many generic brown beetles it’s hard to narrow him down. Any thoughts?
Thanks!!
How you want your letter signed:  Vika

Brown Prionid

Dear Vika,
The Brown Prionid is a relatively common summer identification request from the eastern parts of North America.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination