Currently viewing the category: "Longhorn Beetles"

Longicorn ??
hi just curious what genus and species of longicorn beetle this was, ur site has been very interesting and helpful so any help would be greatly appreciated .
yours greatfully
wayno the bugman

Hi Wayne,
By the looks of things, it appears you might be beginning a collection. This beautiful specimen is one of the Ergates Pine Sawyers. The larva eat the sapwood and heartwood of pines and Douglas firs usually feeding in fallen logs, stumps and telephone poles. According to Hogue, Ergates spiculatus is the largest local beetle in Los Angeles.

RE: phallus or stinger…but on a beetle?
Hello, I love your site.
I found this guy while I was walking in our office parking garage. A friend here at work said “beetles don’t have stingers” so, I guess it could be a phallus. It most closely resembles what you have described on your site as a California Prionus beetle, but the pics you have don’t show a stinger. What is this bug, and what is the pointy-thing?
Thanks,
Courtney Cavness, Austin Texas

Hi Courtney,
Yes your beetle does look like one of the Prionus, but beetles do not have stingers, and the appendage is not a phallus either. We suspect it is an ovipositor since this type of beetle lays eggs in trees, but we will turn to an expert, Eric. Below is his response:

Dear Daniel:
Had to laugh at this one:-) This is indeed another prionid longhorned beetle, but it is a Stenodontes sp. (or what used to be called Stenodontes anyway, I think they changed the name).
The funny part is that this is a FEMALE! The “stinger-phallus” is actually her ovipositor, what she lays eggs with in the crevices of bark. When beetles die, females often evert the normally retracted ovipositor. Who knows why?
Male Stenodontes resemble a prionid crossed with a stag beetle, as they have enlarged jaws (and can USE them, let me tell ya!). Looking forward to seeing the site back up in October. Oh, BUGGUIDE.NET had THEIR server crash, so they are temporarily out of commission also. Bad month! It should be running again by October, but you might want to check, and put a notice up to that effect if it is still not up when your site goes back online.
Take care.
Sincerely,
Eric

What is this beetle in Montreal, Canada
Hi,
This bug looks beautiful, but is it dangerous?

Had you scrolled down our homepage, you would have found another photo of a Locust Borer, Megacyllene robiniae. The closely related Painted Hickory Borer, Megacyllene caryae, is very similar. It is not dangerous, but it probably does mimic Yellow Jackets for protection from birds.

What’s This?
I found this on the patio this morning. A little more info. I found this on the patio this morning. I am in eastern Washington state. It is about an inch long and could move by crawling fairly quickly. It didn’t fly.
Thanks, John

Hi John,
The Locust Borer, Megacyllene robiniae, one of the Long Horned Borer Beetles from the Family Cerambycidae, is capable of flight. The adult Locust Borer is often found on goldenrod where it eats pollen and nectar. The larvae bore in the wood of Black Locust trees after eating the bark. Thank you for your photo. We like getting good images of signature insects. The Locust Borer ranges throughout the Eastern and Southern U.S. and eastern Canada.

some kind of beetle?
Dear Bugman,
I found this bug crawling in the hallway of our home in San Francisco, CA. Sorry about the blurry photos — it was a fast mover and I’m not good with the digital camera. It had wings, but didn’t use them much. I’ve never seen this bug inside or outside, so it piqued my curiosity. Thanks!
Julie

Hi Julie,
We can’t seem to find an exact identification for your Long Horned Borer Beetle, Family Cerambycidae, in our old Dillon and Dillon Beetle Book, but fear not as we have several beetle experts who will probably be notifying us shortly.

Ed. Note: We just received this information.
(08/09/2005) identifications
Hello – I was recently shown your site, and it is excellent. My specialization is longhorned beetles, and in cruising around I notice a number of incomplete or uncertain IDs for this family. I don’t know if you are interested in receiving this sort of input, but if you are, I offer the following additions to your identifications.
This is Xestoleptura crassicornis, an uncommonly collected species which typically breeds in older, dried pine logs, and is found throughout most of the forested portions of the north and central coast, and inland in southern CA.Keep up the good work. You are a valuable resource.
Cheers
Frank Hovore

What an excellent and fun website! I thought you might be able to help me with two mystery bugs that have proven baffling. The second is this strange bug my entomology class in Puerto Rico. We were stuck, and I still am – I can’t place it to order even, although the mouthparts and thorax might suggest some weird orthopteran. This specimen was about 2 and a half cm from antennae-tip to the base of wings.
Thanks!
Robbie

Hi Robbie,
Thanks for the photos of the exotica. They are a mystery to us as well. Your Puerto Rican Orthopteran looks according to Eric Eaton, to be probably a longhorned beetle (Cerambycidae).

Ed. Note: We just received the following correction.
(08/09/2005) identifications Hello – I was recently shown your site, and it is excellent. My specialization is longhorned beetles, and in cruising around I notice a number of incomplete or uncertain IDs for this family. I don’t know if you are interested in receiving this sort of input, but if you are, I offer the following additions to your identifications.
This is a species of Bebelis, probably lignosa, or perhaps schwarzi; no species is specifically recorded from Puerto Rico, but several my occur there. The larvae typically bore in small stems of semi-woody plants (sunflower, ragweed, etc.) Cheers.
Frank Hovore