Currently viewing the category: "Longhorn Beetles"
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Subject:  Wood borer in finished hardwood floor.
Geographic location of the bug:  Brant County near Grand River & Brantford. ON
Date: 11/18/2017
Time: 10:25 AM EDT
Per attached pictures, grub was located by blowing out fine white sawdust from 3.25″ long bore hole and injecting wasp an hornet foam insecticide into the hole to the depth of the hole. The grub moved to the entrance and was removed. The hole was discovered when the surface of the floor sank and in probing the very thin wood and varnish were lost. Further slivers were raised in probing the hole. Can you identify the species?
How you want your letter signed:  Gord Burkholder

Round-Headed Borer

Dear Gord,
Unfortunately, the image of the Round-Headed Borer is considerably less well focused than the image of the wood damage, but even if the image was better quality, we would most likely not be able to provide more than a family identification.  Round-Headed Borers are the larvae of Longicorn Beetles in the family Cerambycidae, and knowing the host plant might be helpful.  What we can tell you is that the larva was most likely already in the wood when the tree was cut, though sometimes the beetles will lay eggs in freshly cut logs.  We can state with relative certainty that the larva was already in the wood by the time the lumber was milled.  Longicorns do not infest milled lumber, so you do not need to worry about further damage, unless there were other larvae in the wood prior to milling.  Do you know the type of hardwood and the location where the trees were grown?  That might help with a more definite identification.  We have heard of incidents when adult beetles will emerge from lumber milled many years in the past.  You might find interesting information on the Nature.com article entitled “Identification of wood-boring beetles (Cermabycidae and Buprestidae) intercepted in trade-associated solid wood packaging material suing DNA barcoding and morphology” where it states:  “Global trade has created a pathway by which nonnative species may cross once impervious natural borders such as oceans and mountains.”  That site acknowledges “The larvae depicted are visually similar and are difficult to identify below the family level. “
 

Wood Damage

Thank you Daniel;
I should have added more info. The floor has been down almost 8 years and the oak came from Quebec. There have been no other indications of other infestation. Part of the house heating is done by a wood stove and I have some concern that the species may have been introduced from the firewood.
Regards;
Gord Burkholder
Hi again Gord,
We are relatively confident this individual was in the wood at the time of milling and not introduced from firewood.
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Two bugs in one day! :0
Geographic location of the bug:  Colombia, South America.
Date: 11/10/2017
Time: 05:54 PM EDT
Hey! So I was just laying in my bed (I live in a house on a hill) and this two bugs just came flying. I tried so hard to identify them but really couldn’t!
The first two pictures’ bug was like medium size and I identified as a Ivory Marked Beetle, but most pictures I saw just didn’t seemed alike.
The second one I have no idea at all lol. It was really small and, as you may see in the picture, has like a little green “drawing” on its back.
How you want your letter signed:  Dead curious, Daniel!

Longicorn

Dear Daniel,
Your first insect does indeed resemble the North American Ivory Marked Beetle, and we started our searching based on the assumption that your individual is most likely a member of the same tribe of Longicorns, Eburiini.  Most members of this tribe pictured on A Photographic Catalog of the Cerambycidae of the World have two white spots per elytra or wing cover.  Your individual appears closest to 
Eburodacrys prolixa which we found on A Photographic Catalog of the Cerambycidae of the World. The genus and species is also pictured on Alchetron.  We are uncertain of the identity of your other insect, but a better quality image would help.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Just curious
Geographic location of the bug:  Cape Town
Date: 11/10/2017
Time: 12:08 PM EDT
My brother in law wants to know what this is, as he has a small child.
How you want your letter signed:  Emile

Longicorn

Dear Emile,
This is a Longicorn or Longhorned Borer Beetle in the family Cerambycidae.  To the best of our knowlege, no member of the family is poisonous or venomous, but many species do have strong mandibles that might produce a painful bite if the beetle is carelessly handled.  Its colors are beautiful, and we wish you had provided a higher resolution image.  Red and black are considered aposomatic or warning colors, and many insects with such coloration, like the North American Velvet Ant or the South African Milkweed Grasshoppers are poisonous, or have a painful venomous sting, but in the case of your Longicorn, this is a harmless camouflage.  Biodiversity Explorer also uses the name Timber Beetle for members of the family, and that is where we located a matching image of
Ceroplesis capensis.  The Natural History Collections site has a nice image of a mounted specimen. If you do have a higher resolution image, please send it.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this bug??
Geographic location of the bug:  Ville Platte La
Date: 11/01/2017
Time: 05:33 PM EDT
Hi, I have searched the internet and can’t seem to find a picture of this but can you please help me out thank you so much for your time.
How you want your letter signed:  MEGAN FONTENOT

Long-Jawed Longhorn Beetle

Dear MEGAN,
Your images of this Long-Jawed Longhorn Beetle,
Trachyderes mandibularis, are beautiful.  According to BugGuide:  “Males have particularly long mandibles.”

Long-Jawed Longhorn Beetle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unidentified bug on sheet hanging on clothesline
Geographic location of the bug:  Kailua Kona, Hawaii
Date: 10/26/2017
Time: 02:55 AM EDT
Please can anyone id this bug? Thank you
How you want your letter signed:  Kathy Shivel

Albizia Longhorned Beetle

Dear Kathy,
This is a Longicorn or Longhorned Borer Beetle in the family Cerambycidae, and our money is on it being an introduced species.  We quickly located this image of the
Coptops aedificator on the Worldwide Cerambycidae Photo Gallery where its range is listed as:  “Arabia, Africa, S. Helena, S. Thomé, Cabo Verde, Madagascar, Comores, Seychelles, Mauritius, Ceylon, India, Andaman. Introduced in China (Taiwan) and Hawaii.”  Previously we have  identified the Albizia Longhorned Beetle in Hawaii.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Some type of longhorned beetle, which one?
Geographic location of the bug:  Bangalore, India
Date: 10/21/2017
Time: 01:19 PM EDT
Greetings Bugman!
I found this fellow, dead under a Ficus Religiosa, in Bangalore, India. Actually, I visit this tree, post lunch everyday. I had noticed this on the branches, often.
The images are on Google drive:  https://drive.google.com/folderview?id=0B06-CTLQ5A2UellYdjB0dHo1SzA
How you want your letter signed:  Naveen

Longicorn

Dear Naveen,
This is truly an impressive Longicorn, and its antennae are amazing.  We did not find anything similar on Prioninae of the World, but we might have missed it.  We will continue to attempt a species identification for you.

Longicorn

Update:  Cesar Crash of Insetologia sent a comment that identifies this beautiful male Longicorn as being in the genus Neocerambyx, and this image of Neocerambyx paris on Cerambycoidea Forum looks very similar.

Longicorn

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination