Currently viewing the category: "Longhorn Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:n  What is this?
Geographic location of the bug:  Eastern Pennsylvania 19504
Date: 03/30/2019
Time: 09:56 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Second one of these we found in our home this week.  One in our living room, one in our kitchen. Wondering what it is and if we may have more. Found mid to late March 2019. Legs damaged in capture.
How you want your letter signed:  Curious homeowner

Spined Oak Borer

Dear Curious homeowner,
Do you have a fireplace or wood burning stove and do you store firewood inside the home?  This is a Spined Oak Borer,
Elaphidion mucronatum, which we identified on BugGuide, and according to BugGuide:  “Extremely polyphagous; hosts include most eastern hardwoods & shrubs.  Also noted in bald cypress (Taxodium distichum)” and “Eggs are laid beneath bark of dead hardwoods. Larvae feed beneath the bark for the first year and feed deeper the second year.”  Adults do not feed on wood.  We are presuming the individuals you found in your home emerged from wood you brought indoors.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Is this a wood eating bug?
Geographic location of the bug:  Southwest Michigan
Date: 03/30/2019
Time: 09:47 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Southwest Michigan
How you want your letter signed:  Tom

Hickory Borer

Dear Tom,
This is a Hickory Borer.  Adult Hickory Borers visit blossoms where they feed on pollen, but larvae are wood borers.  According to BugGuide:  “larvae mine newly dead hickory, and sometimes other hardwoods.” 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Bug from Maui found in wood art
Geographic location of the bug:  In Oregon now, brought Tiki from Hawaii
Date: 03/09/2019
Time: 12:43 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi, Our Tiki from Hawaii had sawdust around it for awhile, I put in a container. A couple months later these two guys showed up. Wondering what they are. Gave them some water but not sure I want to let them loose. They bore big holes in wood.
Thanks!
How you want your letter signed:  Verlan & Kristi

Kiawe Borer

Dear Verlan & Kristi,
This is a Kiawe Roung-Headed Borer,
Placosternus crinicornis, an invasive species in Hawaii.  Its larvae are wood borers that feed on Kiawe or Prosopsis, and ccording to Wikipedia, Kiawe or Prosopis limensis is a species of mesquite native to South America.  According to BugGuide:  “This beetle’s host plant, Kiawe (Prosopis pallida), is a tropical mesquite native to Peru, Ecuador and Colombia that was introduced to Hawai’i by a single seed planted in a courtyard in Honolulu in 1826. Kiawe spread to all islands and became a source of nectar for honey production, the abundant seed pods produced became fodder for a growing cattle industry, and the wood is prized for smoking meats and barbecue. The first Kiawe Round-headed Borer was collected in 1904. The beetles are attracted to felled trees and cut wood.”  Beetles with wood boring larvae frequently emerge from milled lumber many years after the tree that contained the larva was felled.

Kiawe Borers

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Ed. Note:  March 3, 2019
After posting this submission, we realized we had not yet selected a Bug of the Month for March, and since Red Headed Ash Borers are prone to emerging from firewood indoors while winter weather is still prevalent, we thought it would be an appropriate selection for March 2019

Subject:  Brown and Yellow
Geographic location of the bug:  Northwest Ohio
Date: 02/27/2019
Time: 11:55 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi there Bugman, it’s been a little while! I found this small six legged creature in my bedroom and would like to know what it is!
How you want your letter signed:  Hanna B.

Red Headed Ash Borer

Dear Hanna,
Do you store firewood indoors?  This looks to us like a Red Headed Ash Borer,
Neoclytus acuminatus, or another member of the genus.  According to BugGuide:  “Overwinters in infested tree trunks, probably as pupae; adults emerge in early spring and lay eggs under bark of recently dead trees” and “Larvae are common in downed timber with the bark left on.”  When firewood infested with larvae is brought indoors, the heat causes the adults to emerge early.  Many members of the family Cerambycidae have markings and coloration that mimic stinging insects like like this Paper Wasp.

Thank you!! I have several houseplants and a lot of driftwood. Perhaps it hatched from one of my pieces! It is still buzzing around in my house and it is still too cold to just put it outside, but there are sources of water in my house and if I keep seeing it, when it gets warmer outside I’ll let it out. I got another, much better picture of it as it perched on my kitten skull display(see attached)
Thanks again for the help!

Red Headed Ash Borer

Hi again Hanna,
Thanks for sending a better image.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Thailand
Date: 02/23/2019
Time: 10:08 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi Bugman
I took this picture in Thailand I asked local people but they did not know what this is. It flew by me and landed on a banana tree it made a loud humming sound. I only managed to take one picture before it flew off.it was about 1to2 inches long I have tried to identify this bug but with no success.
How you want your letter signed:  Malcolm Bennett

Longicorn:  Zonopterus flavitarsis

Dear Malcolm,
This magnificent beetle is a Longicorn in the family Cerambycidae.  Our initial search turned up several black and yellow striped individuals, but none with the distinctive yellow antennae.  We expect to have a species identity for you before long.  Perhaps one of our readers will have better luck with this ID.

Thank you so much for identifying my picture it was so frustrating that I could not identify this beetle no one has ever seen one I think I was lucky to get this picture thanks again for information
Malcolm

Update:  Thanks to a comment from Cesar Crash, we were directed to a link of an image of Zonopterus flavitarsis that looks correct to us.  Images on BioLib and interestingly, on Odonata of Thailand where there is an image of a living individual, support that ID.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  is this a wasp mimic longhorn beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  Madill, Oklahoma (central southern part of state)
Date: 02/04/2019
Time: 02:38 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  found this unusual beetle while working cows on our ranch this past weekend 2-3-2019. Was a warm (unusual 60’s degree F) winter day
How you want your letter signed:  chris w. bradshaw

Hickory Borer

Dear Chris,
This looks to us like a Hickory Borer.  Hickory Borers are active late in the winter and early in the spring.  Those appear to be oak leaves and acorns in your image.  Do you also have nut trees nearby?  According to BugGuide:  “larvae mine newly dead hickory, and sometimes other hardwoods.”  It is commonly accepted that the Hickory Borer, one of the Longhorned Borer Beetles in the family Cerambycidae, is a Yellowjacket mimic.

Thanks Daniel, and yes we have pecan grove not too far away. They were just planted 3 years ago so not very old yet. Again Thanks.
Chris

Update:  We wouldn’t rule out that this might be a Mesquite Borer, which is pictured on BugGuide, though BugGuide does not report the Mesquite Borer from Oklahoma. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination