Currently viewing the category: "Longhorn Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Fast on foot and flies
Geographic location of the bug:  Eastern TN, US
Date: 06/21/2020
Time: 12:33 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi!  Since moving to Eastern TN, we’ve found our new home to be teeming with all sorts of life.  Here is one that stood out and which I could not identify.  Maybe you can?
How you want your letter signed:  Keith

Red Headed Ash Borer

Dear Keith,
This is a Red Headed Ash Borer,
Neoclytus acuminatus, or a closely related species of Longhorned Borer Beetle.  All indications are that the color, markings and behavior of the Red Headed Ash Borer mimic that of a stinging wasp, which protects the harmless beetle from potential predators.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on the sapwood of ash and other hardwoods, and even occasionally on vines and shrubs. Larvae are common in downed timber with the bark left on.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Big Beatle
Geographic location of the bug:  United states southern California, Rancho Cucamonga
Date: 06/10/2020
Time: 12:35 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello,
We came home to find this guy in our driveway. He wasabout 2 inches long with long antennae and a dark red/marrone/brown color. Do you know what kind of Beatle he is?
How you want your letter signe:  The Davies

California Prionus

Dear Davies,
June and July are the months we receive most North American Prionid sightings, a subfamily of especially large Long-Horned Borer Beetles.  This is a California Prionus or California Root Borer,
Prionus californicus, and according to BugGuide:  “Larva feed primarily on living deciduous trees (oaks, madrone, cottonwood) and are also recorded from roots of vines, grasses, and decomposing hardwoods and conifers. Will also attack fruit trees growing on light, well-drained soils (e.g. apple, cherry, peach).”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Possible Maple Borer Beetle?
Geographic location of the bug:  Cold Spring, NY, USA
Date: 06/05/2020
Time: 10:24 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found this near a pond on my deck. I’ve never seen a beetle like this before. I have no idea what this is.
How you want your letter signed:  Rich

Longhorned Borer Beetle

Dear Rich,
The Sugar Maple Borer is a much larger and even more colorful Beetle.  Your individual is also a member of the Longhorned Borer Beetle family Cerambycidae, and we believe we have identified it as 
Clytus ruricola, a species with no common name, thanks to images on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae in decaying hardwoods, esp. maple (Acer)” so it is theoretically a “Maple Borer.” 

Thanks. I did more research and it’s equivalent to the clytus ruricola. Very unusual but it’s native to northeast US. Thanks for the identification help. Feel free to use the image on your site for future identification. I’m going n Putnam County, NY.
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Wasp, hornet, or bee?
Geographic location of the bug:  Blue Ridge Mountains, Clarke County, VA
Date: 03/30/2020
Time: 03:24 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I noticed 2 or more dozen of these in a firewood pile I have on the side of my yard. I need to stack it to season for next winter. I don’t necessarily want to disturb bees if that’s what they are but I also don’t want to get stung by a swarm and find out if I’m allergic if they are Hornets or wasps.
How you want your letter signed:  Ross

Banded Ash Borer

Dear Ross,
This isn’t a “wasp, hornet, or bee” but rather a Longhorned Borer Beetle in the genus
Neoclytus, probably the Banded Ash Borer, a native species that we identified on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Adults emerge May-Aug in the North, Feb-Nov in the South” and “often emerges indoors from firewood; sawlogs may become infested within 20 days of felling during summer.”  You will not be stung if you stack the wood.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Beetle? What is this?
Geographic location of the bug:  Southern California
Date: 02/27/2020
Time: 08:13 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  What kind of bug is this and will it bite? Does it fly?
How you want your letter signed:  Kayla

Spotted Tree Borer

Hi Kayla,
This is a Longhorned Borer Beetle in the family Cerambycidae, and we are very confident that it is a Spotted Tree Borer,
Synaphaeta guexi, based on images posted to the Natural History of Orange County site.  It does fly and it has very strong mandibles it uses to chew its way to the surface after it matures from a wood boring larva to a winged adult.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Yellowjacket or Cricket?
Geographic location of the bug:  New Jersey
Date: 09/22/2019
Time: 08:48 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This bug landed on me and later seemed to “fly” away like a grasshopper. It wasn’t behaving like a wasp and it’s head and body shape don’t look wasplike. What is it???
How you want your letter signed:  Libby

Locust Borer

Dear Libby,
This Locust Borer is actually a beetle that is a very effective Yellowjacket mimic.  Locust Borers are often found on Goldenrod.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination