Currently viewing the category: "Longhorn Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Please help identify
Geographic location of the bug:  Newport Oregon USA
Date: 08/19/2018
Time: 01:34 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Its hard to see in the picture, but its head is fuzzy and its antennae appear to be segmented.  I searched tirelessly on the internet to indentify this guy but couldnt figure out if its a cockroach, beetle, or wasp.
How you want your letter signed:  Thank you for your help, Ayla.

Lion Beetle

Dear Ayla,
The Lion Beetle,
Ulochaetes leoninus, looks much more like a bee than it resembles other members of the Long Horned Borer Beetle family Cerambycidae.

Lion Beetle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Strange bug
Geographic location of the bug:  New Jersey, USA
Date: 08/18/2018
Time: 09:54 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Just something ive never seen before
How you want your letter signed:  Brian

Locust Borer

Dear Brian,
This striking Locust Borer is an excellent Yellowjacket mimic.  According to BugGuide:  “Considered a serious pest of Black Locust; previously weakened or damaged trees are often killed by the larvae. Previously confined to the native range of Black Locust in the northeast, it has spread with the trees throughout the US and parts of Canada. Black Locust is used for reclamation and similar projects where trees are likely to be stressed and thus more vulnerable to damage.”  Adult Locust Borers are often found feeding on Goldenrod.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this Beetle?
Geographic location of the bug:  Midlothian, Virginia, USA
Date: 08/18/2018
Time: 11:55 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Can you tell me what this bug is ? It is about 1.5” long, black.
Thanks
How you want your letter signed:  Dennis Shand

Tile Horned Prionus

Dear Dennis,
This is an impressive Tile Horned Prionus,
Prionus imbricornis, and according to BugGuide:  “Huge longhorn, dark brown and shining. Antennae have 18-20 overlapping segments (male).  Female has 16-18 serrated segments. Other eastern Prionus have 12-13 antennal segments.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Chameleon bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Glenbeigh Co Kerry Ireland
Date: 08/08/2018
Time: 12:02 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Please identify this strange creature.
How you want your letter signed:  Brian

Musk Beetle

Dear Brian,
We are not entirely certain why you are calling this Musk Beetle,
Aromia moschata, a “Chameleon bug” but we can roll with that.  According to Eakring Birds:  “This is a huge beetle, probably the largest species found in Nottinghamshire. … this is a scarce beetle in Nottinghamshire anyway, and it’s stronghold may possibly be along the Trent and Idle Valleys. Named after it’s ability to produce a pleasant smell, Aromia moschata is a beetle that can also produce an audible sound when handled. It’s also one of the Longhorn Beetles and frankly, has no comparison in size with any others.”  According to the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species:  “European regional assessment: listed as Least Concern in view of its wide distribution, presumed large overall population, it occurs in a number of protected areas, has a tolerance of a degree of habitat modification, and because it is unlikely to be declining fast enough to qualify for listing in a more threatened category.”  The site goes on to list the following countries where the Musk Beetle is reported, a list that includes Ireland:  “Austria; Belarus; Belgium; Bosnia and Herzegovina; Bulgaria; Croatia; Czech Republic; Denmark; Estonia; Finland; France (Corsica, France (mainland)); Germany; Greece (Greece (mainland)); Hungary; Ireland; Italy (Italy (mainland), Sicilia); Latvia; Liechtenstein; Lithuania; Luxembourg; Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of; Moldova; Montenegro; Netherlands; Norway; Poland; Portugal (Azores, Portugal (mainland)); Romania; Russian Federation (Central European Russia, East European Russia, European Russia, Kaliningrad, North European Russia, Northwest European Russia, South European Russia); Serbia (Kosovo, Serbia); Slovakia; Slovenia; Spain (Spain (mainland)); Sweden; Switzerland; Turkey (Turkey-in-Europe); Ukraine (Krym, Ukraine (main part)); United Kingdom (Great Britain, Northern Ireland)” 

Musk Beetle

Thank you! Chameleon because it seemed to change colours. Maybe it was the way the light was shining on it.
Thanks, Brian

It does appear to have a purple to green sheen in the images we have seen.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Asheville, NC Insect
Geographic location of the bug:  Asheville, NC
Date: 08/06/2018
Time: 04:30 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi, my friend found this dead insect near her house and we’d love to find out what it is.
How you want your letter signed:  Curious in NC

Female Flatfaced Longhorn: Graphisurus species

Dear Curious in NC,
Because of the extremely long ovipositor, we believe this female Flatfaced Longhorn is either
Graphisurus fasciatus or  Graphisurus despectus.  Here is a BugGuide image of the latter for comparison.  The former has a greater range and BugGuide data reports it from North Carolina.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  2 bugs: fighting or mating?
Geographic location of the bug:  Kootenays, British Columbia, Canada
Date: 08/04/2018
Time: 12:51 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I was out camping and the hairy looking bug on top aggressively latched onto the one with long antennae. Just wondering what they are, and what was going on? Is the hairy one eating the other one? Are they male and female of the same species and they’re mating? (seems unlikely, they look so different) Thank you for your help!
How you want your letter signed:  Jesse

Robber Fly attacks Whitespotted Sawyer

Dear Jesse,
Your images are awesome, but we wish there was more detail in the image to help us identify the predator, because this is most definitely NOT mating.  The prey is a Whitespotted Sawyer,
Monochamus scutellatus (see BugGuide), and the predator is a large Robber Fly, but we are not certain of the species.  It does not look like any of the Robber Flies in the family Asilidae pictured on the Royal British Columbia Museum.  Large Robber Flies often take down considerably larger prey that they capture while flying.

Whitespotted Sawyer eaten by large Robber Fly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination