Currently viewing the category: "Longhorn Beetles"
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Subject:  Large Beetle Perched in Papaya Tree
Geographic location of the bug:  St Croix, US Virgin Islands
Date: 04/20/2018
Time: 11:07 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Good Day,
Hurricanes Irma and Maria randomly seeded our debris-laden yard with a few dozen Papaya volunteers last September (along with tomatoes, peppers, pumpkin and more!). Jan-March we’ve received little to no rains, and so with recent April sprinklings, these parched trees have finally begun setting flower buds. Today while searching for open buds, this intricate beauty greeted me. After admiring his morphology for a timeless hour (or more), I wondered if I could figure out his name. “Large beetle” in Google’s image search did not help, but it did point me to your site 😃. Using inches, from “head to toe”, the main body measures 2.5″, with width of “shoulder blades” (widest part) being 3/4″ and width of rounded base being 1/2″. The antenna measures just shy of 3″. I opted not to disturb him, so, I don’t know what the underbelly looks like. What a delightful find. Thank you for providing this ID service and forum 🐞☀️🌻
How you want your letter signed:  Lee

Mango Stem Borer

Dear Lee,
This impressive beetle is not native to the Caribbean.  This is an introduced Mango Stem Borer,
Batocera rufomaculata, a species native to Asia.  Its larvae bore in the stems of mango, fig and papaya among other trees.  According to Carnivora:  “A serious pest of edible fig, mango, guava, jackfruit, pomegranate, apple, rubber, and walnut. In India recorded for more than 30 different host plants.  The female cuts the tree bark and lays eggs singly into these cuts, laying a total of up to 200 eggs. Egg is a brownish-white cylinder, 6.2 mm, with narrowly rounded ends. On hatching the larvae start to tunnel into the sapwood of the trunk or branches. Larval development takes about 2 years. As a very large species, the larval tunnel measuring 2 or 3 centimeters in width that is correspondingly large and very damaging to the tree. The larvae tunnel through the sapwood and because of their size, they make large tunnel which interfere with sap flow and affect foliage and fruit production. Attack by Batocera rufomaculata often leads to the death of the tree. Tree death has been recorded in the Virgin Islands, Israel, Mauritius, India and Malaysia. Economic loss can follow when the tree attacked bears fruits or yields another product.”

Mango Stem Borer

Whoa…. so potentially (most likely) this is a female boring eggs into the stem right now. Hmmm… I shall relocate her momentarily, as I believe she chose a host with female flower buds that eventually will fruit. Was kinda hoping the bug was a pollinator vs parasite. Incidentally, this cluster of papaya are growing under what used to be a massive Mango canopy, felled by recent hurricanes. The past 4-5 years, it rarely produced mangos, and if so, on a only few branches (15% at best). Whereas 5-6 years ago, it was fruiting heavily. Mr Bugman, I sincerely appreciate your ID expertise. Simultaneously, you solved our long curiosity as to why mangos systematically stopped appearing on our once-massive tree  Thank you, Lee

Hi again Lee,
In our opinion, the pictured tree upon which you found this Mango Stem Borer is too young to be able to support a growing larva.  There is some evidence that adult beetles feed on leaves, based on this image we located on Dreamstime.

That’s a cool foraging pic. Thank you for the addition info and links. What an enjoyable, interactive, backyard entomology trip

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Subject:  Longhorned  Borer Beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  Galapagos Islands, Isla San Cristobal
Date: 04/08/2018
Time: 01:02 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this longhorned borer beetle at my hotel on Isla San Cristobal. I was just wondering what the exact type it is, since there are so many different kinds of beetle.
How you want your letter signed:  Kristopher Olson

Longicorn

Dear Kristopher,
This beetle is indeed a Longicorn in the family Cerambycidae, but a straight on dorsal view is ideal for identification purposes and your images are taken from an angle.  Your individual greatly resembles the Ivory Marked Beetle
Eburia quadrigeminata, found in North America, and as we were searching the internet to identify your individual, we believe we located it on A Photographic Catalog of the Cerambycidae of the World, and it appears to be Eburia lanigera lanigera, a member of the same genus as the North American Ivory Marked Beetle.

Longicorn

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this!?
Geographic location of the bug:  Greensburg IN
Date: 04/02/2018
Time: 04:26 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This bug started appearing in my home a week ago, Im noticing more of them everyday. I have no idea what this is. It does have antennas as well.
How you want your letter signed:  Jen

Hickory Borer

Hi Jen,
Do you have a fireplace or a wood burning stove and a stack of firewood indoors?  Is the firewood hickory?  Our bet is that this adult Longhorned Borer Beetle in the genus
Megacyllene emerged from firewood you have stored indoors.  The Hickory Borer, which is pictured on BugGuide, is a species that emerges in the spring and the Locust Borer, a nearly identical looking member of the same genus emerges in the fall, is also pictured on BugGuide.  Either species will emerge in the spring from wood stored indoors, so the season is not definitive, but if the wood was black locust wood, then we would lean toward this being a Locust Borer.  This emergence might be an annoyance for you, but the beetles will not infest your home or furnishings.  They will infest newly cut trees and logs.

Yes, I do have a fireplace and just brought a new box full of wood in a little over a week ago. Thanks so much for the information. I was starting to think they we’re invading my home & was freaking out a little bit! It’s great to know that’s not going to happen! Thanks again

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Longicorn BVI
Geographic location of the bug:  St. John USVI
Date: 03/29/2018
Time: 12:29 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello, I found the letter from the gentleman in BVI about this beetle. I too found one here in the USVI, Just across the channel from the BVI.  Here is a  picture of the one I found. I’m betting it all that it’s the same bug.
How you want your letter signed:  B. Crites

Longicorn: Lagocheirus guadeloupensis

Dear B. Crites,
Thanks to your excellent images, we believe we have identified both your Longicorn and the individual in the previous posting you cited as
Lagocheirus guadeloupensis thanks to Cerambycidae de las Antillas.  A mounted individual is also pictured on Coléopteres des Antilles.  A live individual is pictured on Inventaire National du Patrimoine Naturel.

Longicorn: Lagocheirus guadeloupensis

My photos are of a very alive one also. Thanks so much for getting back to my. Are these native or invasive. Natural or harmful, do you know? What a great site you have. Similar to mine, but mine is Marine wildlife.
Barb Crites

Hi again Barb,
We will continue to research and hopefully find the host tree or trees.  All indications are that this is a native species for you.  It is possible that fallen trees due to the hurricanes have provided a food source for the larvae, but most Longicorns remain in the larval stage for several years, so these two sightings are probably premature to be connected to the recent hurricanes.

Hi Daniel, I can add that this beetle looks very similar to the mango tree borer, which I would guess got here the same way the wild growing mango trees did.a local resident thinks they are a pest to our turpentine trees. How true that is I don’t know. I have a tendance to agree with you that we are seeing them now because of all the down tree matter from the hurricanes.
Barb

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What bug is this
Geographic location of the bug:  Southeast pennsylvania
Date: 03/25/2018
Time: 07:50 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I think this is an ash borer. We only see it when we bring ash firewood into the house. Can you tell exactly what borer it is. Pics are of the back and the belly sides. Thanks
How you want your letter signed:  Dalton

Banded Ash Borer

Dear Dalton,
Thank you for resending the images.  This is a Banded Ash Borer,
Neoclytus caprea, and according to BugGuide:  “often emerges indoors from firewood; sawlogs may become infested within 20 days of felling during summer.” 

Banded Ash Borer

Thank you for the clarification. The room they are in has 1” pine on walls and 5/16 pine on ceiling and solid larch beams.  all has urathane on the front and is kiln dried except for beams. But after 12 years of the wood burner in this room I would think they are pretty dry also.
Any chance of these critters infesting wood in the room. ????
Oops. Sorry. Just looked at the various info you sent and have answer my own questions. Thanks very much for getting back. I searched every bug guide I could find online and never found a pic of them.
We highly doubt that would happen.
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Hurricane Irma changed this bugs range?
Geographic location of the bug:  Tortola, British Virgin Islands
Date: 03/19/2018
Time: 09:36 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  In 25 years of visiting here, I never saw this bug before.  Now, after hurricane Irma, I see two or three every night. They are attracted to artificial light, and do not move much during the night.  The geckos and anole lizards leave them alone.  It is about an inch long.    I would be grateful for your identification, and your opinion about the idea that the hurricane could have altered their range, or even introduced them to this island. Thank you.
How you want your letter signed:  RD

Longicorn:  Lagocheirus guadeloupensis

Dear RD,
This is a Longicorn in the family Cerambycidae, and we are pretty certain it is a Flat-Faced Longhorn in the subfamily Lamiinae.  We were not able to match your individual (the angle on the image might make identification difficult as a straight dorsal shot would be better) to any of the mounted specimens pictured on Cerambycidae de las Antillas, but we did find a reference to
Monochamus titillator, the Southern Pine Sawyer being found in the Bahamas in Tropical Zoology. and BugGuide lists the range as “e. US / Bahamas.”  For now, we will leave the species as unidentified.  Now, regarding its sudden, recent appearance, we don’t believe large numbers of this wood boring species would have been transported by Hurricane Irma.  We suspect many trees were downed during the winds.  If the wood was not cleared away, it would have provided a food source and it could possibly have resulted in a population explosion of a normally innocuous species.  This unidentified species from the Caribbean on FlickR looks very similar to your individual.

Update:  March 30, 2018
We just received a new submission and now we are somewhat confident that this individual as well as the new submission are both Lagocheirus guadeloupensis which is pictured on the Cerambycidae de las Antillas site, and we apologize for missing it originally.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination