Currently viewing the category: "Lady Bug"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Request for insect identification & control instructions
Location: Alberton, Johannesburg, South Africa
February 9, 2017 7:09 am
Good afternoon Bugman,
We have a very big problem with the insects in the below photos, and the problems keeps escalating very quickly. It is a very big concern, as they are busy taking over our whole yard and they leave their sticky residue on everything.
Can you please have a look at the photos and see if you know what this is, and if possible give me some instructions on how we can get rid of them?
The start out like the larvae on the left of the photo , and then become beetles like the one on the right of the photo.
In the bottom photo you can see a whole lot of them together in their various stages of development.
Signature: Filna Heymans

Multicolored Asian Lady Beetle Larva and Pupa

Dear Filna,
It is quite interesting to us that you are concerned about the larvae and pupae of these Lady Beetles, but you have not mentioned the winged adults.  We strongly suspect that these are the early stages of the invasive Multicolored Asian Lady Beetles,
Harmonia axyridis, but we had to verify their occurrence in South Africa on iSpot where we discovered the most awesome Clime Lab logo posted by who is “studying the thermal biology of the alien ladybird Harmonia axyridis (harlequin ladybird, multi-coloured Asian lady beetle) in South Africa and their observations will be useful for determining microclimates.”  The Multicolored Asian Lady Beetle is a threat to native Lady Beetle species in North America because the invasive species is so prolific, and it will prey on native species.  They get quite numerous and they frequently cause homemakers to fret when they enter homes to hibernate in great numbers as the weather begins to cool  Though we recognize the threat they make to native species, alas, What’s That Bug? does not provide extermination advice.  

Multicolored Asian Lady Beetle Larvae and Pupae

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Lady bug invasion?
Location: East Texas woods
January 31, 2017 10:30 am
For a couple of months we have been assaulted by literally MILLIONS of little beetles that resemble lady bugs. They are literally everywhere…outside and inside! These come in a range of colors from deep red through mustard yellow. Some have black spots, some don’t. We live in the Piney Woods of East Texas. Any thoughts? Thank you!!! (Sorry the photo is a bit blurred.)
Signature: Overwhelmed

Multicolored Asian Lady Beetles

Dear Overwhelmed,
Though your image is quite blurry, we suspect you have encountered the introduced Multicolored Asian Lady Beetles that are known to hibernate indoors in great numbers.  See BugGuide for examples of the color and pattern diversity exhibited by the Multicolored Asian Lady Beetles,
Harmonia axyridis.  Our Better Nature has an interesting article on invasions of Multicolored Asian Lady Beetles.

Dear Daniel — Bull’s Eye!!!  That’s definitely what we’re dealing with!  I so appreciate your help. I’m engaging in the process of searching out and caulking every miniscule seam, crack or nail hole in my siding, though I expect it will not fully resolve this issue. I share the concern expressed in response to another inquiry re: the attack on our native lady beetles and the resultant decrease in genetic diversity. Let’s hear it for introduced species!  (A bit of sarcasm there). At any rate, thanks so much for your response!
Overwhelmed

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Can’t fathom what this is
Location: Alabama
December 19, 2016 2:11 am
Dear bugman,
I found this bug crawling slowly in my room. I live in Alabama. I know we have carpet beetles I literally cannot figure out what this is. It’s like covered or made out of black fur. It had legs and was crawling. The pictures Wil do the best talking. Please if you can check it out o appreciate it .
Signature: Chel

Lady Beetle Larva

Lady Beetle Larva

Dear Chel,
This sure looks like a predatory Lady Beetle Larva to us.

Lady Beetle Larva

Lady Beetle Larva

Oh thank you so so so so so much !! I am so happy to know what it was ! 🙂

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Egg Cluster
Location: Central Florida
November 13, 2016 11:48 am
Found these eggs attached to the aerial roots of an orchid this morning. Mid Fall and mid morning.
I have both intact and another picture where they had hatched.
Signature: A Constant Florida Gardener

Multicolored Asian Lady Beetle Eggs, we believe

Multicolored Asian Lady Beetle Eggs, we believe

Dear Constant Florida Gardener,
These sure look like the Eggs of a Multicolored Asian Lady Beetle that are posted to BugGuide.  Though they will eat Aphids, we consider the Multicolored Asian Lady Beetle to be an Invasive Exotic species that might be partially responsible for the decline in native Lady Beetle populations.  We would not rule out that they are the eggs of a native Lady Beetle.

Thank you so much for the reference and quick response.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Lady bug cousin?
Location: Boulder CO
November 6, 2016 10:34 pm
What do you think this is? Found on bedroom curtain. Spouse did return from trip but also has 2 welts that look like tiny dots inside a big welt on torso & back that itch some. We live in Colorado, it’s been warm here almost 70. We have pets & doors open often.
Signature: Bugged Out

Multicolored Asian Lady Beetle

Multicolored Asian Lady Beetle

Dear Bugged Out,
This is a Multicolored Asian Lady Beetle,
Harmonia axyridis, a highly variable species that was introduced from Asia many years ago.  It is a species prone to forming large aggregations and also known for moving indoors as the weather cools to hibernate.  Its proliferation is believed to be a contributing factor to lower populations of native Lady Beetles.  It is possible to be bitten by predatory Lady Beetles, but we suspect the welts on your spouse are from another creature.  See BugGuide for more information on the Multicolored Asian Lady Beetle.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Some sort of parasite?
Location: Lafayette, NJ
July 12, 2016 12:53 pm
I found a most curious thing today while out hiking – an asian multicolored lady beetle with it’s shell open, wings extended, and what appears to be some sort of growth or parasite on its back. I’ve never seen anything like this before and can’t come up with any explanation. So, hoping you can have a look at these photos and perhaps solve the mystery?
Signature: Deborah Bifulco

What Parasitized the Multicolored Asian Lady Beetle???

What Parasitized the Multicolored Asian Lady Beetle???

Hi Deborah,
Though we cannot at this time provide you with a conclusive identification of what parasitized this Multicolored Asian Lady Beetle,
Harmonia axyridis, we hope that whatever it is will help reduce the populations of this invasive Lady Beetle that is displacing many native species.  Our best guess is that it is the pupa of a Tachinid Fly or some parasitic Hymenopteran.  According to Featured Creatures:  “All insects have predators, parasites/parasitoids, and/or pathogens. Ladybirds are not exempt. Larvae of Epilachna borealis and E. varivestis are attacked by a native tachinid fly (Aplomyiopsis epilachnae (Aldrich)) which specializes in the genus Epilachna. Larvae of E. varivestis also are attacked by a eulophid wasp (Pediobius foveolatus, see above). This wasp is a parasitoid of other epilachnine ladybirds in India, and was introduced into the USA specifically to control Epilachna varivestis. Another native tachinid fly, Hyalmyodes triangulifer (Loew), is less specialized, attacking larvae not only of Epilachna varivestis, but also of Coleomegilla maculata, several weevils, and a pterophorid moth. Perhaps the best known of the parasitoids of ladybirds is the braconid wasp Perilitus coccinellae (Schrank). It attacks adult ladybirds and to a lesser extent larvae and pupae (Obrycki et al. 1985). It attacks Coccinella septempunctata, Coleomegilla maculata, and several other species. Many other parasitoids and pathogens of ladybirds are not mentioned here for lack of space.”

Thanks, Daniel – I just wasn’t quite sure what I was seeing, although some sort of parasite makes the most sense.
Interestingly, I have been seeing more native lady beetle species this summer in our area – many more than in past summers.  I am very encouraged by this as I know the asian has really hurt our native species.
Debbi

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination