Currently viewing the category: "Grubs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown Beautiful Creey Crawly
Location: Forest Lake, MN
November 1, 2015 8:33 pm
Hey, Dan! I hope this finds you and your family doing well!
I was at a friends house today and they were splitting old Red Oak for the winter. We came across this beauty, burrowed what looked like about 4 inches into the tree trunk. It’s about 2 inches long. I’m sorry I didn’t get a photo of it when it came out of the hole eventually. I thought I got enough photos but I guess not. Do you have any idea what it could be? I usually check your site before I ask, but I don’t know if it’s larvae, pupae, or what. We are all dying to find out! I feel bad that it’s probably now going to die, but perhaps an opossum with find a tasty meal.
Signature: carpwoman

Beetle Grub

Beetle Grub

Dear Carpwoman,
This is some species of Beetle Grub, and we followed up on our initial suspicion that this might be the larva of an Eyed Elater, and we believe we are correct.  Images on both BugGuide and Bug Eric confirm our suspicions.  According to Bug Eric:  “Larvae of all Alaus species live in decaying wood where they prey on the larvae and pupae of other kinds of beetles.  These ginat ‘wireworms’ have strong jaws and should be handled carefully, if at all.”  According to BugGuide:  ” larvae in decaying hardwood or pine wood, esp. in decaying roots.  Food Larvae feed on larvae and pupae of various insects, esp. beetles.”  The much more commonly encountered adult form of the Eyed Elater or Eyed Click Beetle is a large beetle with false eyespots.

Thank you for such a speedy response!  It’s nice to see this beautiful grub would have (hopefully still will) turned into such a cool beetle.
Joanne

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Identification Needed!
Location: Hetauda, Central Region, Nepal
July 30, 2015 5:58 pm
Hello Bugman,
I have this little creature that looks amazing, i have always found it living and feeding on Bitter Melon or Bitter Gourd leaves.
Now please give me name. Thank you very much.
Signature: Suman Acharya

Probably Tortoise Beetle Larva

Probably Tortoise Beetle Larva

Dear Suman,
Our initial web search did not produce any matching images while searching with the key word Nepal, but we believe, based on the similarity in appearance to other species from other locales that we have identified, that this is the larva of a Tortoise Beetle in the tribe Cassidini.  Here is an image of a North American individual from BugGuide.  The larvae of Tortoise Beetles are often quite spiny, they feed on leaves and they are often very host specific.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to provide some more specific information.

Probably Tortoise Beetle Larva

Probably Tortoise Beetle Larva

Probably Tortoise Beetle Larva

Probably Tortoise Beetle Larva

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: I found this orange bug
Location: In a rabbit hole
May 9, 2015 9:52 am
I found these in my rabbit habitat im.Like usually I got ciourious.Do you know what it is?
Signature: From anonymous

Wireworms

Wireworms

Dear anonymous,
We believe these are Wireworms, the larvae of Click Beetles in the family Elateridae.  More information on Wireworms can be found on the Maine Government page.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Scarabs in Chicago?!
Location: Chicago, Illinois USA
April 26, 2015 7:28 pm
These grubs were inside of a dying silver maple. Found in the middle amongst wood pulp and poop. We live just north of the Windy City. I figured it was some kind of rhino or tricerotops beetle.
Signature: Jim Griesenauer

Scarab Beetle Grubs

Scarab Beetle Grubs

Dear Jim,
We agree with your assessment that these Scarab Beetle Grubs are in the subfamily Dynastinae, the Rhinoceros Beetles.  In our opinion, they probably began feeding on the rotting portion of the dying tree because we do not believe that the grubs were responsible for the tree’s demise.  Thanks for including the images of the children because they provide a nice sense of scale for these large grubs.  We suspect that large Scarab grubs are considered edible by entomophages, so we will attempt to contact David Gracer (see Huffington Post Food Blog) for his opinion.

Scarab Beetle Grubs

Scarab Beetle Grubs

Scarab Beetle Grubs with Children for scale

Scarab Beetle Grubs with Children for scale

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Rainbow Colored larvae or caterpillar
Location: New Bern, NC
April 19, 2015 11:17 am
Found a few of these crawling around a small shrub at the edge of the woods behind my house; North Carolina, Croatan Forest, Longleaf Pine/swamp habitat. Never seen colors like this before and can’t find it in my caterpillar book nor online. (You try Googling rainbow caterpillar/larvae and see what you get! LOL . . .)
Help?
Signature: Diane

Groundselbush Beetle Larva

Groundselbush Beetle Larva

Dear Diane,
We have trouble remembering the name of the Groundselbush Beetle Larva,
Trirhabda bacharidis, but we always remember its distinctive appearance and we can quickly locate older postings of Groundselbush Beetle Larvae.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: caterpillar
Location: Dubai, UAE
March 25, 2015 2:39 am
Hi…
discovered this whilst at a park in the UAE….my nephews are very keen on knowing what kind of caterpillar this is….and I am clueless…..would love some information on it…
Thanks..
Signature: Bevill JB

Scarab Beetle Grub

Scarab Beetle Grub

Dear Bevill JB,
This is not a caterpillar.  It is the Grub or immature stage of a Scarab Beetle.

Dear Daniel…
That is so fascinating.
Thank you very much for responding. This is a  simply wonderful and most educative site I have seen in ages.
Best regards,

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination