Currently viewing the category: "Grubs"

Subject: Cottonwood stag beetle
Location: Orem ut
January 1, 2017 5:37 pm
We have what we believe is a cottonwood stag beetle larvae. He is over 2 inches long and has large pinchers. We found him buried in the wood chips at the playground where we have seen the really big cottonwood stag beetles and we are assuming for its size and location that is what we have. My kids really want to “raise” it. We have kept it in a jar with wood chips for about 3 months. We occasionally add a little water. I can’t find anything about it’s lifecycle. What else can we do to ensure a successful metamorphosis in the spring/summer. We check every few days for movement through the glass, so far so good.
Signature: Jr entomologists

Probably Cottonwood Stag Beetle Grub

Probably Cottonwood Stag Beetle Grub

Dear Jr entomologists,
You are our first posting of the New Year after returning back to the office today.  We agree that this is most likely a Cottonwood Stag Beetle Grub since you have found adults in the vicinity.  Your individual looks like the Stag Beetle Grub pictured on BugGuide.

Probably Cottonwood Stag Beetle Grub

Probably Cottonwood Stag Beetle Grub

Subject: ODD ivory colored insect that bites
Location: Mississippi
November 13, 2016 4:39 pm
My son was bitten by what he called a “mean caterpillar”. However, I don’t believe it is a caterpillar. I have no idea what this insect might be. Please help.
Thank you,
The Parker’s
Signature: Alicia

Scarab Beetle Grub

Scarab Beetle Grub

Dear Alicia,
This is the grub of a Scarab Beetle, probably one of the June Beetles.  There is no concern regarding the bite.

Subject: gray and black beetle-like bug on swamp milkweed
Location: Fenton, MO
September 4, 2016 1:51 pm
Dear Bugman,
I ran into this creature while inspecting my swamp milkweed for monarch caterpillars. I found ver 10 caterpillars as well as this gray and sort of shiny creature. It has 5 black dots on each side and I think I see 6 legs but really small. its about the size of a ladybug. Found it on underside of Swamp. Milkweed leaf toward top of stem. I cannot tell where to begin to find out what this little guy or gal is and if he/she means harm to my milkweed or my monarch caterpillars.
Thanks so much!
Signature: fran

Swamp Milkweed Beetle Larva

Swamp Milkweed Leaf Beetle Larva

Dear Fran,
This is the larva of a Swamp Milkweed Leaf Beetle,
Labidomera clivicollis, and we identified it on BugGuide based on this image.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae and adults cut several side-veins of a milkweed leaf prior to feeding, to reduce the sticky latex that would otherwise be produced at their feeding sites.”  So, the larvae and adults of the Swamp Milkweed Leaf Beetle share the same food source as the Monarch Butterfly, and unless the beetles are so populous that they defoliate the plants, they are not a threat to either the milkweed or the Monarch caterpillars.

Thanks you so much.  A few folks had thought it might be a false Potato Bug larvae??? Since I found it on a swamp milkweed leaf, a Swamp Milkweed Leaf Beetle makes sense!
Thanks do much!
fran

 

Subject: What is this bug
Location: Monkton MD
August 9, 2016 5:31 pm
Help. Our neighborhood cannot figure out what this bug is
Signature: Curious

Beetle Larva we presume

Beetle Larva we presume

Dear Curious,
Your somewhat blurry image reminds us of the classic photo of Nessie.  Our best guess on this is that it is some beetle larva, possibly a Ground Beetle larva as it looks rather similar to a Caterpillar Hunter larva.

Subject: identify bug
Location: plymouth mass
July 17, 2016 10:18 am
Just wondering what type of bug this is
Signature: lara killen

Caterpillar Hunter Carnage

Caterpillar Hunter Carnage

Dear Lara,
This is the larva of a Caterpillar Hunter, one of the Ground Beetles in the genus
Calosoma.  It looks like someone killed it, so we are tagging this posting with Unnecessary Carnage.  Many people kill insects with which they are unfamiliar out of irrational fear.  This is a beneficial species and we hope that should you encounter another in the future, you will let it survive to eat caterpillars.  Caterpillar Hunters are important natural control agents for Gypsy Moths and others.

Subject: Uknown bug pupa/nymph
Location: South-eastern europe/Serbia
July 7, 2016 6:41 am
I found this bug pupa/nymph buried under ground in a group of four. They are filled with some white, almost milk like fluid and are found few inches below ground. It looks familiar to me, but I am not sure what it actually is, so I’m want to know is this bug dangerous and can it do any damage to the crops in the garden.
Signature: MD

Scarab Beetle Pupa

Scarab Beetle Pupa

Dear MD,
We are very confident that this is the Pupa of a Scarab Beetle in the family Scarabaeidae and our first thought is that it must be the Pupa of a Cockchafer since that is the most common European Scarab Beetle submitted to our site, however, based on this image posted to the Gardening & Landscaping Stack Exchange and this image posted to the HYPP Zoology page, after clicking the link, we believe you have a different species.  According to Research Gate:  “A total of 178 species, 83 genera, 15 tribes, and 7 subfamilies of the family Scarabaeidae are recorded from Serbia.”  This image of a pupa of a female European Rhinoceros Beetle,
Oryctes nasicornis ondrejanus, from BioLib looks much closer.  

Scarab Beetle Pupa

Scarab Beetle Pupa

Scarab Beetle Pupa

Scarab Beetle Pupa