Currently viewing the category: "Grubs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Grub found in Florida
Geographic location of the bug:  Sanibel Island, Florida, USA
Date: 03/04/2018
Time: 07:00 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello!  Found this huge grub at the transition zone between mangrove bayou and the beach on Sanibel Island, Florida on March 1, 2018.   For reference, it’s in my hand and I’m a 5’4” adult.  Placed it back on the ground under a leaf after snapping this photo.  Thanks for your help!
How you want your letter signed:  Hannah

Eastern Hercules Beetle Grub, we believe

Dear Hannah,
This is the grub of a Scarab Beetle, and considering its size, we believe it is a grub of an Eastern Hercules Beetle.  We suspect it was found near rotting wood.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Bug found burrowing in dirt
Geographic location of the bug:  St Croix USVI
Date: 02/27/2018
Time: 01:32 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  We had a landslide into our planters after hurricane Maria. We found these bugs burrowing in the dirt. And we have no idea what they are but look like they could bite.
How you want your letter signed:  Janice DeWald

Scarab Beetle Grub

Dear Janice,
This is the grub of a Scarab Beetle and they are not aggressive.  They are often found near rotting stumps, in compost piles and many species feed on the roots of grasses, so they are also found in lawns and gardens.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What am I and can i kill trees?
Geographic location of the bug:  Millican Tx
Date: 01/30/2018
Time: 10:01 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello, recently i hauled off a dead tree from my mothers house and while cutting it up for firewood, found this Larva stage looking fellow.. id like to know what kind of insect this is and is it capable of killing trees once it burrowed in or was it just looking for a spot to metamorphosis?
How you want your letter signed:  Thanks! Vivian Stanley

Beetle Grub: Cerambycidae or Buprestidae???

Dear Vivian,
This is a Beetle Grub, most likely from either the Longhorned Borer family Cerambycidae, or the Metallic Borer family Buprestidae.  A single grub will not kill a tree, but a serious infestation might compromise the health of a tree.  You did not indicate what type of tree it was since many Borer Beetles are very host specific.  Additionally, you did not indicate the size.  Immature Grubs can be difficult to identify with certainty, and we cannot see enough features, including the head, to help narrow down the possibilities.

Thanks so much for your speedy response, i truly appreciate it. The information you’ve provided will be most helpful indeed!!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Grub
Geographic location of the bug:  San Diego coastal 15″ below ground
Date: 01/20/2018
Time: 08:00 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I’ve never encountered a grub so large before and would like to know what kind of beetle this will become.
How you want your letter signed:  Matt Lee

Prionid Larva

Dear Matt,
This appears to be one of the Root Borers in the subfamily Prioninae.  Was there a tree or shrub nearby, or perhaps the trunk of something that had died?  While we are reluctant to provide a definitive species identification, it might be the larva of a California Root Borer like this image posted to BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae: Up to 80mm long” and “Larva feed primarily on living deciduous trees (oaks, madrone, cottonwood) and are also recorded from roots of vines, grasses, and decomposing hardwoods and conifers. Will also attack fruit trees growing on light, well-drained soils (e.g. apple, cherry, peach).”  If that is a correct identification, here is an image of an adult male California Root Borer, though your larva might belong to a different, though similarly large Prionid with long antennae. 

Prionid Larva

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Mystery Grub
Geographic location of the bug:  Orange County, CA
Date: 12/02/2017
Time: 12:49 AM EDT
Hello.  I moved a tent in my backyard and found many of these grubs.  One of the ones was much bigger than the others.  You can see it in the photo compared to my thumb.
How you want your letter signed:  Michael

Scarab Beetle Grubs

Dear Michael,
These are Scarab Beetle Grubs.  Many species feed on the roots of grasses.  Others are found in or near decaying vegetation, including in compost piles and rotted logs.  We are postdating your submission to go live near the end of the month when our editorial staff is on holiday.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Coleoptera larva?
Geographic location of the bug:  Serengeti in Tanzania
Date: 11/30/2017
Time: 02:58 PM EDT
Hi!
I’m not sure but possibly it’s a coleopteran larva. I’ve been searching by Internet but it’s been impossible to find any larva like this one.
Can you help me?
It was in may 2016.
Thanks!
How you want your letter signed:  Ferran Lizana

Larva, probably Beetle Larva

Dear Ferran,
Except for butterflies and moths, there is often not much documentation available on immature insects.  We agree this is probably a beetle larva.  We are posting the image and perhaps our readers will want to take a stab at this identification.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination