Currently viewing the category: "Grubs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bugs on Quercus ilex (Spain)
Location: Salamanca (Spain)
February 20, 2017 6:14 am
I enclose three pictures of two bugs (larva and adult) found on young Quercus ilex (inside). The larva is about 25 mm and de adults about 2 mm. They were found in Salamanca (central western Spain).
They don’t look like the usual borers in the area.
Thank you very much
Signature: Luis Carlos Jovellar (Salamanca, Spain)

Round-Headed Borer

Dear Luis,
The images of the larva you submitted appear to be Round-Headed Borers, a general name for the larvae of members of the Longhorned Borer Family Cerambycidae.  See this BugGuide image for comparison.  They are unrelated to the adult insects you submitted which we will address at a later date.  Knowing the host plant is often a tremendous assistance in the identification of larval stages.  According to the opening sentence of a scholarly article we located on Springer Link:  “
Cerambyx welensii Küster is one of the greatest threats to Quercus suber L. and Quercus ilex L. in Spain.”  While that is not a definitive identification for the Round-Headed Borer you sighted, chances are good that it might be a correct identification.  iNaturalist has an image of the adult.  Your larva has a distinctive yellow coloration.  The Espiritu de Arbol blog has images of adults and larvae.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Eww…
Location: Philadelphia, Pa
January 3, 2017 6:09 pm
So we recently moved into a new house and after clearing up a drainfly issue, we started finding these guys. At first I thought they were worms but then I found them on the walls and by my sink, too far for most to crawl. They are kinda gross and I am having a hard time figuring out what they are.
Thanks in advance!!
Signature: New homeowner

Probably Beetle Larva

Dear New Homeowner,
Though your image lacks critical detail, in our opinion, this appears to be a Termite, which is consistent with your sighting location on walls and near the sink.  Wood found near plumbing in older homes can often become infested with Termites because of the damp conditions and leaks that might cause wood to rot.  You should probably have a professional investigate for potential infestations.  See images on BugGuide here and here to support our identification.

Cesar Crash Comments.
Hi, Cesar Crash here, I’m using other e-mail.
This guy, I’m quite sure it isn’t a termite.
I suppose it’s a beetle larvae, morfologicaly, it resembles this:  http://bugguide.net/node/view/501532
Cesar.
Sorry, I didn’t say, I’m blocked from commenting again, I recieve an anti-spam message.

Thanks for the comment Cesar.  We will check into your inability to submit comments.  There was just some work done on the site and that might have resulted in your problems.  We also thought this might be a beetle larva, but discounted the look of the legs as relating to the poor quality of the image.

Karl also believes this is a Beetle Larva
Hello Daniel and New Homeowner:
You are right Daniel, the image is unfortunately short on detail. However, I am not quite convinced that this is a termite. The antennae seem too short and the cerci on the other end don’t look quite right either. I wonder if this isn’t in fact a beetle larva, perhaps something like a soft winged flower beetle (Melyridae). Both adults and larvae are predators of other arthropods and they do occasionally enter homes. Personally, I would rather find predaceous beetle larvae in my home, than termites. Regards.  Karl

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Cottonwood stag beetle
Location: Orem ut
January 1, 2017 5:37 pm
We have what we believe is a cottonwood stag beetle larvae. He is over 2 inches long and has large pinchers. We found him buried in the wood chips at the playground where we have seen the really big cottonwood stag beetles and we are assuming for its size and location that is what we have. My kids really want to “raise” it. We have kept it in a jar with wood chips for about 3 months. We occasionally add a little water. I can’t find anything about it’s lifecycle. What else can we do to ensure a successful metamorphosis in the spring/summer. We check every few days for movement through the glass, so far so good.
Signature: Jr entomologists

Probably Cottonwood Stag Beetle Grub

Probably Cottonwood Stag Beetle Grub

Dear Jr entomologists,
You are our first posting of the New Year after returning back to the office today.  We agree that this is most likely a Cottonwood Stag Beetle Grub since you have found adults in the vicinity.  Your individual looks like the Stag Beetle Grub pictured on BugGuide.

Probably Cottonwood Stag Beetle Grub

Probably Cottonwood Stag Beetle Grub

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: ODD ivory colored insect that bites
Location: Mississippi
November 13, 2016 4:39 pm
My son was bitten by what he called a “mean caterpillar”. However, I don’t believe it is a caterpillar. I have no idea what this insect might be. Please help.
Thank you,
The Parker’s
Signature: Alicia

Scarab Beetle Grub

Scarab Beetle Grub

Dear Alicia,
This is the grub of a Scarab Beetle, probably one of the June Beetles.  There is no concern regarding the bite.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: gray and black beetle-like bug on swamp milkweed
Location: Fenton, MO
September 4, 2016 1:51 pm
Dear Bugman,
I ran into this creature while inspecting my swamp milkweed for monarch caterpillars. I found ver 10 caterpillars as well as this gray and sort of shiny creature. It has 5 black dots on each side and I think I see 6 legs but really small. its about the size of a ladybug. Found it on underside of Swamp. Milkweed leaf toward top of stem. I cannot tell where to begin to find out what this little guy or gal is and if he/she means harm to my milkweed or my monarch caterpillars.
Thanks so much!
Signature: fran

Swamp Milkweed Beetle Larva

Swamp Milkweed Leaf Beetle Larva

Dear Fran,
This is the larva of a Swamp Milkweed Leaf Beetle,
Labidomera clivicollis, and we identified it on BugGuide based on this image.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae and adults cut several side-veins of a milkweed leaf prior to feeding, to reduce the sticky latex that would otherwise be produced at their feeding sites.”  So, the larvae and adults of the Swamp Milkweed Leaf Beetle share the same food source as the Monarch Butterfly, and unless the beetles are so populous that they defoliate the plants, they are not a threat to either the milkweed or the Monarch caterpillars.

Thanks you so much.  A few folks had thought it might be a false Potato Bug larvae??? Since I found it on a swamp milkweed leaf, a Swamp Milkweed Leaf Beetle makes sense!
Thanks do much!
fran

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this bug
Location: Monkton MD
August 9, 2016 5:31 pm
Help. Our neighborhood cannot figure out what this bug is
Signature: Curious

Beetle Larva we presume

Beetle Larva we presume

Dear Curious,
Your somewhat blurry image reminds us of the classic photo of Nessie.  Our best guess on this is that it is some beetle larva, possibly a Ground Beetle larva as it looks rather similar to a Caterpillar Hunter larva.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination