Currently viewing the category: "Tiger Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Mountain Bug love
October 16, 2009
Found these two love-bugs while hiking a mountain in the Hudson Valley region of New York state during late spring. I’m not sure what they are, but I think they’re in love ;).
Tori
Hudson Valley, New York

Mating Purple Tiger Beetles

Mating Purple Tiger Beetles

Hi Tori,
These are mating Tiger Beetles in the genus Cicindela.  There are numerous species illustrated on BugGuide.  We believe they may be Purple Tiger Beetles, Cicindela purpurea, though we would prefer to have an actual expert confirm the species ID.  You can check out the photos and description of the Purple Tiger Beetle on BugGuide.

Dave Gracer’s comment
What’s cool about this pic is that the female has got some food, most likely supplied by the male as a token.  In other words, sex for food.  Other kinds of animals do this — I don’t know how many, but I know that roadrunners to it.  Pretty fascinating, when you consider the possibility that there are some vague analogies in our species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

what is this called?
August 9, 2009
I don’t see these very often, but this one got inside or I wouldn’t have had to kill it. It is a gorgeous bug, with irridescent colours and moves really fast. and i’m just curious what it’s called.
thanks, Kelli
Griffin, Georgia

Carolina Tiger Beetle

Carolina Tiger Beetle

Dear Kelli,
This is a harmless predatory Carolina Tiger Beetle, Tetracha carolina, also known as the Pan American Big Headed Tiger Beetle.  Tiger Beetles are no threat to you, your family or your home.  It probably was attracted to lights which is why it left its typical habitat of, according to BugGuide:  “Sandbanks of rivers, pastures, open, disturbed areas. Often found near water. Nocturnal, found under boards, rocks, trash, etc. during day
” and entered your home.

Unnecessary Carnage Comment
August 9, 2009
RE: unnecessary carnage
I love your site, and visit it several times a day. Many thanks for posting such lovely images and so much information (you helped me ID a one-eyed Sphinx moth here in Seattle)! I also love the fact that you tell folks when they have committed an act of unnecessary carnage, but sadly, you have been very hesitant to do so lately… Please don’t let one or two unhinged people keep you from providing a vital service- letting humans know that insects are innocent until proven guilty!
Leah S.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

2 pollinators 1 fuzzy-legged jumper
July 31, 2009
1 green pollinator, 1 brown pollinator, 1 maybe cricket with fuzzy grayish fizz on legs…all at coast in San Luis Obispo County, CA
Denise
San Luis Obispo County, CA coast

probably Hairy Necked Tiger Beetle

probably Hairy Necked Tiger Beetle

Dear Denise,
It is impossible for us to respond to every email we receive, so we must select which letters get responses and further cull from those for posting.  It is very difficult for us to deal with three different species in one letter.  With that clarified, your “1 maybe cricket with fuzzy grayish fiss on legs” is actually a  Tiger Beetle, in the genus Cicindela which has numerous species continent wide that resemble your individual.  You may scan the possibilities on BugGuide as we have done in an attempt to properly identify your individual.
We believe the Hairy-Necked Tiger Beetle, Cicindela hirticollis, it a strong candidate for the proper identification.  According to BugGuide, it is found in California, and there is a photograph of a specimen collected in Marin County.  There is also a set of photos of a live specimen in Ventura County.  It also resembles the Pacific Coast Tiger Beetle, Cicindela bellissima, though the range of that species, according to BugGuide, is more north, though the range map might not be comprehensive.  If you resubmit your other requests with more a more detailed letter, we may be able to provide an identification if time permits.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Rainbow Bug
July 20, 2009
this is a bug we found wandering on the ground while playing with my son. Its colors were so brilliant in the sunlight that i captured it to get a better look. I think it is some kind of beetle because of its jaw…but its coloring is unlike anything ive ever seen. We live in east texas. Is this a common insect in this area? Thanks!
Intrigued in texas
East Texas

Carolina Tiger Beetle

Carolina Tiger Beetle

Dear Intrigued,
We believe your gorgeous beetle is a Carolina Tiger Beetle, Tetracha carolina, based on photos posted to BugGuide.  It is also called a Pan-American Big-headed Tiger Beetle.  BugGuide also indicates:  “Range  Southern United States. In southeast: Virginia to Florida, Arkansas, Louisiana. Perhaps absent from Appalachians, though Brimley (1) reports it from Asheville, North Carolina. Also found in southwest, west to California.  Habitat  Sandbanks of rivers, pastures, open, disturbed areas. Often found near water. Nocturnal, found under boards, rocks, trash, etc. during day.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

What kind of bug is this?!
July 13, 2009
Ok, we’ve been catching these things since i can remember and we’ve always called them doodlebugs, but after researching on the internet it seems that my family must be the only ones who call these doodlebugs! So, i’m just curious as to what they really are called. We always would catch these by sticking a long blade of grass or pine needle (anything long and slender) and wait for it to start moving and pushing back up and then just pull it up real fast and they would come flying out!
Also, when you touch them with something they will arch their backs real fast as if they try to stick you with whatever that hump towards the end of their body is. Is this some kind of stinger or something??
Thanks alot for your help!
Tim D.
Bastrop, LA

Tiger Beetle Larva

Tiger Beetle Larva

Hi Tim,
This is a Tiger Beetle Larva in the subfamily Cicindelinae
.  There is another insect commonly called a Doodlebug, and that is the larva of the Antlion.  The method you describe for catching your Tiger Beetle Larva is almost identical to the method used by children to catch a true Doodlebug.

Tiger Beetle Larva Hole

Tiger Beetle Larva Hole

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Green metallic beetle (?) love
Sat, May 30, 2009 at 4:40 PM
Hi Bugman, we found this handsome green couple on a sunny rock at Great Falls Park in MD (they were so preoccupied that they failed to even notice the garter snake we were watching mere inches away). I’m wondering if they’re borers of some kind since a large dead tree was nearby. Before they became engaged they moved very quickly and even ran over the snake’s back once or twice.Can you tell us what they are?–didn’t have any luck searching “iridescent green” and “metallic green” on the site. (Photo taken by Elizabeth Bouras)
Love the site and the new design. Thanks for your help!
Paula O’Keefe
Great Falls, MD, USA

Mating Six Spotted Tiger Beetles

Mating Six Spotted Tiger Beetles

Hi Paula,
This is a pair of Six Spotted Tiger Beetles, Cicindela sexguttata, a species with a relatively extensive range.  According to BugGuide:  “In the United States, found over much of the eastern and Great Plains states.  Absent from the Gulf Coast area.  Range continues into southeastern Canada.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination