Currently viewing the category: "Tiger Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Green and blue bug
Location: MInnesota
June 9, 2017 7:23 pm
I see this bug right in my yard. It is amazing but what is it?
Signature: BettyLou

Six Spotted Tiger Beetle

Dear BettyLou,
This is a harmless, beneficial, predatory Tiger Beetle, most likely an unspotted Six Spotted Tiger Beetle,
Cicindela sexguttata, which is pictured on BugGuide. where you will find this comment:  “C. sexguttata generally become less spotted as one goes west, so many individuals in Iowa are likely spotless.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beetle
Location: Broken Arrow, OK
June 17, 2017 7:26 am
A neighbor of mine posted something about this bug. None of us knows what it is and I was wondering if you knew? I tried to google it but no luck….
Signature: Penny Roberts

Virginia Metallic Tiger Beetle

Dear Penny,
We began our research on identifying this Tiger Beetle with a web search that led us to the Beetles in the Bush site, where there are images of the Florida Metallic Tiger Beetle posted, and they look so similar to the individual in your images, that we suspected they might be in the same genus, so we searched the genus 
Tetracha on BugGuide which led us to the Virginia Metallic Tiger Beetle, Tetracha virginica, which is featured in some nice BugGuide images.  According to BugGuide:  “Crepuscular or nocturnal. Hides during day under stones, rocks, etc., especially near water. Attracted to lights at night” and it is described as “Tiger beetle shape. Glossy green body and elytra, distinctive compared to Cicindela species. Legs are a contrasting tan. Elytra lack maculations. Compared to other members of this genus, no light crescent-shaped markings at apex (tip) of elytra. Note also large size–largest North American member of this genus.”  Tiger Beetles are fierce hunters that pose no threat to humans, and for that reason, we are tagging this entry as Unnecessary Carnage.  We hope you inform your neighbor that these beautiful beetles, much prized by collectors for their gorgeous metallic colors, are beneficial in the hope that future encounters to not end with a death.  As an aside, though named the Virginia Metallic Tiger Beetle, this species is actually reported as far west as Texas and Oklahoma based on BugGuide data.   

Virginia Metallic Tiger Beetle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Flying Green Devil
Location: Northern Kentucky
May 17, 2017 12:44 pm
I have several of these around my office in Hebron, KY, which is just a few miles away from the Cincinnati Airport. They’re kind of like June Bugs, but I don’t think they are. Would you please let me know what these are? Thank you!
Signature: – Andy

Six Spotted Tiger Beetle

Dear Andy,
Though your image is quite blurry, it definitely depicts a gorgeous, beneficial, predatory Six Spotted Tiger Beetle.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Shiny beetle found in my garden
Location: Galveston county, Texas
July 10, 2016 2:34 pm
I was watering my garden and this bug came out of the mud/dirt. It reminds me of a Japanese beetle and a grasshopper mixed together. I’ve seen two of the same kind of bug very close to my tomatoes and in no other part of my garden. Both times it was about mid-day (summer time) near Galveston, Tx. I just want to know what it is and if it’s bad.
Signature: All my thanks, Morgan

Pan American Big Headed Tiger Beetle Carnage

Pan American Big Headed Tiger Beetle Carnage

Dear Morgan,
Not only is it beautiful, this Tiger Beetle is a beneficial predator that will help control the number of insects in your garden naturally.  We believe we have correctly identified this beauty as a Pan American Big Headed Tiger Beetle or Carolina Metallic Tiger Beetle,
Tetracha carolina, thanks to images posted to BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Sandbanks of rivers, pastures, open, disturbed areas. Often found near water. Nocturnal, found under boards, rocks, trash, etc. during day.”  We hope you will tolerate this gorgeous predator in the future, but for now we have to tag your submission as Unnecessary Carnage.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: butterflies/moths
Location: Tangaras Reserve, Colombia SA
March 19, 2016 4:12 am
Good Morning,
I’ve just returned from Colombia, South America and I’ve managed to identify everything except these remaining photos. I hope you can assist. They’re tricky, that’s for sure!
Signature: Cokey

Tiger Beetle

Tiger Beetle

Hi again Cokey,
Your Tiger Beetle looks very similar to this FlickR image from Costa Rica that is identified as
Pseudoxycheila tarsalis.  According to Carabidae of the World, it is found in “Colombia, Costa Rica, Panama.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Tiger Beetle hunting behaviour?
Location: Short Hills Provincial Park, Thorold, Ontario
July 14, 2015 4:52 am
Hi WTB!
I thought you might like these pictures of tiger beetles I took at Short Hills Provincial Park. I like how one is a brilliant green and the other is a more sapphire colour. I noticed both beetles making a pose where they leaned back, almost as if to get a better view of their surroundings. Do you know if that’s a hunting behaviour or perhaps a reaction to my presence?
It was a very colourful day for bugs, as you can see — I was also able to see many Ebony Jewelwings, and they exhibited a similar range of colours. Some were a lighter aquamarine colour, and some, like the last picture provided, were more of an indigo colour.
Anyway, I love your site, and hope you enjoy these pictures even if you don’t post them. Thank you for the great service you provide 🙂
Signature: Brad

Six Spotted Tiger Beetle

Six Spotted Tiger Beetle

Dear Brad,
Your Tiger Beetle images are beautiful.  The green individual is a Six Spotted Tiger Beetle, and according to BugGuide, it is described as:  “Brilliant green coloration with six white spots distinctive. Occasional variation: bluish overall color, or spots missing.”  That could mean that both of your images are the same species.  Tiger Beetles are excellent hunters with good eyesight, and they are quite wary of people, so we are uncertain if the behavior you witnessed is typical hunting behavior or the result of sensing a large human nearby.  We will create a separate posting for your Ebony Jewelwing image.

Tiger Beetle

Tiger Beetle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination