Currently viewing the category: "Ground Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this bug
Location: Monkton MD
August 9, 2016 5:31 pm
Help. Our neighborhood cannot figure out what this bug is
Signature: Curious

Beetle Larva we presume

Beetle Larva we presume

Dear Curious,
Your somewhat blurry image reminds us of the classic photo of Nessie.  Our best guess on this is that it is some beetle larva, possibly a Ground Beetle larva as it looks rather similar to a Caterpillar Hunter larva.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beetle ID
Location: Anchorage, AK
July 31, 2016 10:37 am
Although born and raised in Anchorage, this year is the first I’ve come across this beetle. I can not seem to find any Alaskan reference (picture) on the web, so I’m turning it over to you. The sample photo’d was found while working in a flower bed. A couple of more came up while raking out some heavy moss in the yard. (They seemed to be under the moss.) They definitely do not like light and run until they can hide their body under something, or can burrow into loose dirt or a crack. (This one was very hard to photograph.) They are at least 3/4 inch long and possibly closer to an inch. Other than the size, the iridescent horns on the rear edges of thorax is the most distinctive feature.
Signature: Rich Johnson

European Ground Beetle

European Ground Beetle

Dear Rich,
Based on this BugGuide image, we are confident this is a European Ground Beetle,
Carabus nemoralis, a species that was introduced from the Old World.  Its North American range, according to BugGuide is:  “n. US & Canada, absent from Great Plains (BG data) native to Europe, adventive in NA (in the east: NF-MN-ne.VA; in the west: BC-CA to AB-UT; isolated in the Saskatoon area, SK).”  According to the Natural History of Southeast Alaska:  “Introduced species so far (as of 2011) known only from Sitka, where it does not seem to be uncommon” and “First reported from Alaska in Sitka, adults seem to be relatively common around yards/gardens by May and into June, though not later in the summer.”

Thank you so much for the ID; the photo attached to your link is my guy.
Given the climate around south central I’m not too surprised they are this far north of Sitka.
We’ve also just had two of the mildest winters and warmest summers that I can remember.
(And I’m Anchorage born & raised, and over 60.)
I’m sure they are not seen much due to their apparent aversion to daylight, which can be tough to avoid in the summer up here.
All the best, and thank you again.
Rich

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: identify bug
Location: plymouth mass
July 17, 2016 10:18 am
Just wondering what type of bug this is
Signature: lara killen

Caterpillar Hunter Carnage

Caterpillar Hunter Carnage

Dear Lara,
This is the larva of a Caterpillar Hunter, one of the Ground Beetles in the genus
Calosoma.  It looks like someone killed it, so we are tagging this posting with Unnecessary Carnage.  Many people kill insects with which they are unfamiliar out of irrational fear.  This is a beneficial species and we hope that should you encounter another in the future, you will let it survive to eat caterpillars.  Caterpillar Hunters are important natural control agents for Gypsy Moths and others.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Shiny beetle found in my garden
Location: Galveston county, Texas
July 10, 2016 2:34 pm
I was watering my garden and this bug came out of the mud/dirt. It reminds me of a Japanese beetle and a grasshopper mixed together. I’ve seen two of the same kind of bug very close to my tomatoes and in no other part of my garden. Both times it was about mid-day (summer time) near Galveston, Tx. I just want to know what it is and if it’s bad.
Signature: All my thanks, Morgan

Pan American Big Headed Tiger Beetle Carnage

Pan American Big Headed Tiger Beetle Carnage

Dear Morgan,
Not only is it beautiful, this Tiger Beetle is a beneficial predator that will help control the number of insects in your garden naturally.  We believe we have correctly identified this beauty as a Pan American Big Headed Tiger Beetle or Carolina Metallic Tiger Beetle,
Tetracha carolina, thanks to images posted to BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Sandbanks of rivers, pastures, open, disturbed areas. Often found near water. Nocturnal, found under boards, rocks, trash, etc. during day.”  We hope you will tolerate this gorgeous predator in the future, but for now we have to tag your submission as Unnecessary Carnage.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Black Beetle in Texas
Location: Texas
June 17, 2016 6:35 am
I saw this beetle in April 2011 in Texas in Kickapoo State Park. It was 2-3 inches long, a big beetle.
What is it?
Signature: Joe

Fierce Ground Beetle

Fierce Ground Beetle

Dear Joe,
We were able to identify quickly this Fierce Ground Beetle in the genus
Pasimachus on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide, Fierce Ground Beetles eat “caterpillars, other larval insects.”  Based on your location, we believe you have either Pasicachus californicus which according to BugGuide, their range is:  “AZ-TX-NE-UT / Mex. (does not occur in CA)” or Pasimachus depressus which according to BugGuide is “Noted from Carolinas, Oklahoma. Internet references suggest it is found west to Arizona” and described as “Large, black, elytra and pronotum often bordered with blue/violet. Elytra of male shiny, of female dull, neither have striations or punctures. Base of pronotum (next to abdomen margined). Hind tarsus long and slender.”

Thanks Daniel!
It was the biggest beetle I ever saw in the us that wasn’t in captivity.
Joe Greco

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown Insect Larva
Location: Denver, Colorado
May 28, 2016 5:08 pm
Dear WTB,
While on a walk through my neighborhood in Denver, I found this black insect larva crawling around the sidewalk.
It was fairly large, I’m guessing around 1-1/2″ long, and moved at several inches per second, making taking a good photo a little tricky. This happened today, May 28th. The area is a low-density urban neighborhood with lots of yards, lawns, gardens, and trees. There are water sources in the general area, but not near where the insect was found.
I’m guessing this is some type of beetle larva, but I’ve definitely never seen this species, or one that come close to this size, before.
Signature: Duncan

Caterpillar Hunter

Caterpillar Hunter

Dear Duncan,
This is the larva of a Caterpillar Hunter, a Ground Beetle in the genus
Calosoma.  Both larvae and adults from this genus consume large numbers of caterpillars.  See this BugGuide image for comparison.  We are postdating your submission to go live to our site during our absence from the office in mid-June.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination