Currently viewing the category: "Ground Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What am I?  I scared the people around me!
Geographic location of the bug:  San Francisco, CA USA
Date: 11/27/2017
Time: 04:22 AM EDT
Hello, I found this bug crawling across my bathroom floor.  I poured 70% alcohol over it and that stopped it. I took this picture after it dried.  It is about a 1/2 cm.  Should I be scared?  Do you think he was alone…
How you want your letter signed:  Thank you very much, Rick

Ground Beetle

Dear Rick,
This is a harmless (to humans), predatory Ground Beetle in the family Carabidae.  As Ground Beetles go, it is a small individual, with Caterpillar Hunters reaching about an inch and a half in length.  In our opinion, pouring alcohol on a harmless creature is Unnecessary Carnage.

Daniel,
Thank you for your quick response.  Point taken.  When I saw, what I now know to be a beetle, I called in my roommate.  He thought it was a bed bug– and we did kill it.   When we looked up close, we figured out it probably wasn’t a bed bug, but still didn’t know if it might be dangerous.  Now we know.
Thanks, Rick

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Bugs on bugs.
Geographic location of the bug:  Vernon, British Columbia, Canada
Date: 10/30/2017
Time: 12:39 PM EDT
Upon taking some photographs of a Granulated Carabid, I noticed that there was a smaller individual on the subject. Locating several other Carabids in the area, it was found that several individuals had these unknown hitchhikers, with numbers ranging between 0 and 4.
How you want your letter signed:  Scott

Mite on Ground Beetle

Dear Scott,
The creature you found on this Granulated Carabid is a Mite, and there are phoretic or hitchhiking mites that use beetles as a means of transportation.  Phoretic Mites are commonly found on Sexton Beetles in great numbers and the Mites take advantage of the flying Sexton Beetles to transport them to new locations to find food.  We know of no instances of phoretic Mites using Ground Beetles for transportation, so it is entirely possible that this particular Mite might have a more ominous reason for being on the Granulated Carabid you found.  Ground Beetle Macro Photography has an example of a Mite found on a Ground Beetle but there is no explanation.  This might be a phoretic Mite, but we haven’t the expertise with Mites to be certain.

Granulated Carabid

Mite

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Beetle eating banana slug Southeast Alaska
Geographic location of the bug:  Juneau, AK
Date: 10/22/2017
Time: 02:03 PM EDT
Hi there! I see these beetles wandering the ground and on and under rotten logs all over Southeast Alaska and the rainforests of the Pacific Northwest (WA, OR, British Columbia) and I have not been able to ID them! They have these wonderful purpleish abdomens and are maybe an inch long or less. This one was found with a baby banana slug in its jaws! What is it?
How you want your letter signed:  Thanks! -Mike J

Snail Eating Ground Beetle with immature Banana Slug

Dear Mike,
Your image is gorgeous.  We have several images on our site of Snail Hunters or Snail Eating Ground Beetles in the genus
Scaphinotus, but your image is the only one showing its preferred prey.  According to BugGuide:  “55 spp. in 9 subgenera total, all in our area.”  Several species are known from Alaska, including Scaphinotus angusticollis which is pictured on BugGuide and Scaphinotus marginatus which is also pictured on BugGuide.  Both species look very similar to your individual and we are not confident enough to provide an exact species identification for you.  According to Bugs of the Month:  “Scaphinotus angusticollis is large (satisfyingly so) and black, with a beauteous purple or greenish sheen in sunlight. The thorax is peculiarly shaped, turned up at the outer edges (a bit like a satellite dish), the legs are quite long and slender and the head is distinctly narrow and elongate. Truly the Afghan hound of the carabid world. The narrow head is an adaptation to eating snails from the shell. Now there are shelled snails in forests around these parts, but with forest clearing and the introduction of non-native pests, shelled snails are less frequent and slugs abound.”

Wow thank you for the thorough reply! They really are quite beautiful, and now I know that the beetles I see eating snails and on the ground are snail eating ground beetles 🙂 You are right, those two species are nearly identical, I guess if I was on the spotI would tell someone it was Angusticolus.

Thanks again!
Stay Curious

Mike Justa
Wildlife Naturalist
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Weird blue bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Scioto County,Ohio
Date: 09/12/2017
Time: 06:27 PM EDT
Found this unusual creature while hiking in southern Ohio on September 10,2017.It was scurrying through the leaf litter and its bright blue color caught my eye.Have never seen anything like this and hope you can ID it for me.
How you want your letter signed:  Stumped in Ohio

Notched Mouth Ground Beetle Larva

Dear Stumped in Ohio,
This is one gorgeous Beetle larva.  We quickly identified it on BugGuide as a Notched Mouth Ground Beetle larva from the genus
Dicaelus.  According to BugGuide, the habitat is “Woodlands, esp. deciduous. Usually found under rocks, logs.”

Notched Mouth Ground Beetle Larva

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown stag beetle?
Location: Raleigh, NC
August 6, 2017 5:51 pm
I found these beetles mating when I was going out for a walk. The blueish lining on the edge of the beetle and the pinchers were very interesting. I’ve searched online for this type of beetle but I found nothing. Please help me identify this beetle.
Signature: Seiya Furukawa

Mating Warrior Beetles

Dear Seiya,
Despite the large mandibles, these are not Stag Beetles.  They are Ground Beetles in the genus
Pasimachus which Arthur V. Evans refers to as Warrior Beetles in his book Beetles of Eastern North America.  A similar looking individual is pictured on Ohio Birds and Biodiversity, and it is called a Blue Margined Ground Beetle, Pasimachus depressus.  This image from BugGuide is not too different from your image.  BugGuide does not provide a common name, but does provide this description:  “Large, black, elytra and pronotum often bordered with blue/violet. Elytra of male shiny, of female dull, neither have striations or punctures. Base of pronotum (next to abdomen margined). Hind tarsus long and slender.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Green and blue bug
Location: MInnesota
June 9, 2017 7:23 pm
I see this bug right in my yard. It is amazing but what is it?
Signature: BettyLou

Six Spotted Tiger Beetle

Dear BettyLou,
This is a harmless, beneficial, predatory Tiger Beetle, most likely an unspotted Six Spotted Tiger Beetle,
Cicindela sexguttata, which is pictured on BugGuide. where you will find this comment:  “C. sexguttata generally become less spotted as one goes west, so many individuals in Iowa are likely spotless.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination