Currently viewing the category: "Flower Beetles and False Blister Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Spanish fly?
Geographic location of the bug:  Ipswich east anglia
Date: 05/27/2020
Time: 07:21 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi bugman just spotted this on a margarita plant and can’t identify it! From google images it looks like a spanish fly
How you want your letter signed:  Chris

Thick Legged Flower Beetle

Dear Chris,
This is not the Blister Beetle commonly called Spanish Fly.  It is a Thick Legged Flower Beetle,
Oedemera nobilis, which is profiled on Wildlife Insight where it states it is:  “a common beetle that can be identified by its dazzling colour and gap in the elytra (wing case). This gap in the elytra is not always so obvious but generally gives the appearance of wings that don’t close properly over its back. The males are very distinctive having obvious green bulges in their legs. These beetles certainly catch the eye with their metallic green wing cases glistenening in the sunlight as they feed in the open on flower heads.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Green blister bug?
Geographic location of the bug:  Isle of Wight, UK
Date: 05/25/2019
Time: 02:17 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi, found this bug near Orchard Bay on the Isle of Wight in England. From googling it looks like a green blister bug, but they don’t seem like they’re in the UK?
How you want your letter signed:  Jack

Spanish Fly and Soft Winged Flower Beetle

Dear Jack,
This is a very exciting posting for us.  We believe your Blister Beetle is the true Spanish Fly,
Lytta vesicatoria, which is pictured on UK Beetle Recording with some southern sightings including the Isle of Wight.  According to NBN Atlas:  “Spanish fly is an emerald-green beetle, Lytta vesicatoria, in the blister beetle family (Meloidae). It and other such species were used in preparations offered by traditional apothecaries, often referred to as Cantharides or Spanish fly. The insect is the source of the terpenoid cantharidin, a toxic blistering agent once used as an aphrodisiac.”  GBIF has an interesting article.  We are very curious about the smaller beetle in your image, which though the coloration is the same, appears to be a different species.

Hi Daniel,
Thanks for getting back and helping identify the species in the photo, the links you included are interesting. There were more than just those 2, there were 10-15 of the smaller ones, all on the same flowers as in the picture. Took a photo of that one as it was the biggest by far, probably about 2 inches.
I didn’t think much of the size difference and just figured it was age/maturity, but am also intrigued having now looked at the life cycle of a beetle? Am I right in thinking they’d emerge from the pupa at their fully grown size?
Many Thanks,
Jack

Hi again Jack,
When insects including Beetles emerge from the pupa, they are fully grown.  Smaller individuals probably did not feed as well during the larval stage, hence the smaller size.
Update:  June 20, 2019
Thanks to a comment from Jim, we now know that the smaller beetle is a Soft Winged Flower Beetle in the family Dasyticidae:  Psilothrix viridicoeruleus.  There are images on UK Beetle Recording.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Chrysomelidae?
Geographic location of the bug:  Maple Ridge, BC
Date: 01/26/2018
Time: 07:58 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi,
I captured this beetle in a pitfall trap near a small stream in a forest near Maple Ridge, BC in August 2013. I’m looking to get help identifying the family, and have offered a few pictures that might help. Any advice would be appreciated!
Thank you!
How you want your letter signed:  Tonya Ramey

Broad-Hipped Flower Beetle

Dear Tonya,
By the time our miniscule staff began researching this Beetle, which reminds us of a Soldier Beetle, we found the vast resources on BugGuide had already identified it as a Broad-Hipped Flower Beetle,
Ischalia vancouverensis, in the family Ischaliidae.

Broad-Hipped Flower Beetle

Hi Daniel,
Yes, thank you! I was really surprised how fast it was answered. I’ve posted a few things on there with no reply, so thank you for checking it out! Ischaliidae was not on my radar.
Cheers,
Tonya

Broad-Hipped Flower Beetle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Shiny green beetle
Location: London SE13
July 6, 2015 6:11 am
Hi
can you help me identify this beetle, reasonable abundant at the moment inmy local cemetary (Brockley & Ladywell), and usually found on flower heads
thanks
Signature: A Smith

Thick Legged Flower Beetle

Thick Legged Flower Beetle

Dear A Smith,
We located your beetle on Nature Spot where it is identified as a Swollen Thighed Beetle,
Oedemera nobilis, and this information is provided:  “Habitat Flower meadows, gardens and waste ground where they visit flowers.  When to see it April to September.  Life History This beetle is a pollen feeder.”  It is a False Blister Beetle in the family  Oedemeridae.  We found it in our archives and we previously used the common name Thick Legged Flower Beetle.

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?Longhorn Beetle?
Location: Arundel, West Sussex UK
May 20, 2011 5:41 am
Came across this beetle today 20052011 on framework of conservatory.
Could you identify, please?
Signature: Brian

Thick Legged Flower Beetle

Dear Brian,
Without too much effort, we quickly identified this comely specimen as a male Thick Legged Flower Beetle,
Oedemera nobilis, on the National Insect Week website (June 25 – July 1, 2012)  where it states:  “This spectacular metallic-green beetle is usually seen on flowers. Only the male – seen here – has the characteristic thickened hind ‘thighs’ (femora). This species is common in gardens and grassland, and in open spaces in woods, in the south, but is more often found in coastal areas in the north of the country. The larvae feed and develop within plant stems.”  The Natural England website adds this information:  “This species is often seen on the flowers of ox-eye daisies. Another commonly seen species in gardens is a dull sage-green colour. Both are common throughout southern and south east England, but are a lucky rare find in the north, apart from south Cumbria where they are not uncommon.  Adults feed on pollen in a wide variety of open-structured flowers. It may be found on various members of the daisy, carrot and rose family, including hogweed, hawthorn, dogrose and bramble. The larvae live in hollow plant stems.”

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Whats this green bug?
Whats this green bug? Found it last month in Bristol UK someone suggested it’s a “Green horned beetle” or a French friend said a “mante religieuse” but I cannot find it in my book
Thanks
K

Hi K,
We know of a site devoted to common UK Beetles, and this beauty is identified as Oedemera nobilis, the Thick-Legged Flower Beetle in the family Oedemeridae. The site states: “This spectacular metallic-green beetle is usually seen on flowers. Only the male

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination