Currently viewing the category: "Feather Horned and Cedar Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: cockroach or beetle?
Location: MALAYSIA
February 27, 2013 11:54 pm
Hello there bugman. I was wondering what kind of bug is this? It can even fly around and it has the eyebrow looking stuff i mean eyelashes .. Tried google it but doesnt have anything returned
This is the picture i have uploaded hopefully i will get to know this more. Thanks
Signature: BRANDON

Beetle with Plumose Antennae

Beetle with Flabellate Antennae

Dear Brandon,
The entomological term to describe this beetle’s antennae is flabellate and you can see examples of flabellate antennae on BugGuide.  In form, your beetle resembles a Click Beetle in the family Elateridae, and there are Click Beetles with plumose antennae, but we suspect that this might be a member of a smaller and more obscure family of beetles that is contained within the superfamily Elateroidea.  We decided to search our own archives and we found that a very similar beetle was our 10,000th posting and it was tentatively identified as
Callirhipis cardwellensis.  Not long after that, we posted an individual, also from Malaysia, that looks identical to your beetle.  If your beetle is Callirhipis cardwellensis, then it belongs in the family Callirhipidae, as evidenced by these specimen tags on the Victoria Museum website.  According to BugGuide, the family Callirhipidae contains Callirhipid Cedar Beetles.  We are certain that your networking cache will spike as soon as you are able to post the identity of this unusual beetle.

Possibly Callirhipis cardwellensis

Possibly Callirhipis cardwellensis

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Black beetle with feathery antenae
Location: Akron, Ohio (city sidewalk)
December 12, 2012 9:49 pm
Love this site! Any chance you can tell me what genus/species of beetle is this?
My girlfriend and I were taking a walk this fall in NE Ohio (USA) when I spotted this beetle on the sidewalk, exhibiting some odd behavior. It did not seem to be bothered by us and continued to walk around, with its wings spread. This made it easy to photograph, but since all I had was my phone, this is the best I could get.
Signature: Bearlo

Cedar Beetle

Hi Bearlo,
We have not had any luck with a conclusive identity in our initial web search, but our best guess at the moment is that this is some member of the superfamily Elateroidea.  You can browse the possibilities on Bugguide.  We have requested some assistance from Eric Eaton and we hope to hear back from him shortly.

Thanks for the quick response. I’ll search on the Superfamily Elateroidea and check out Bugguide. Have a great weekend and a wonderful holiday.

Eric Eaton identifies the Cedar Beetle
Daniel:
They changed the format on Yahoo!Mail again.  Took me a minute to find the “reply” icon!
Yes, this is a male Sandalus niger, the “Cedar Beetle,” in the cicada parasite family Rhipiceridae:
http://bugguide.net/node/view/148447
Neat find, though they are quite common.  Where you find one there is usually more.
Eric

Thanks for the assistance Eric.  I contemplated the Cicada Parasite Beetle or Feather Horned Beetle family, but didn’t scrutinize the possibilities too closely.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Mystery Beetle with fan-like antennae
Location: Central Ohio (in October)
October 25, 2011 3:29 pm
Hi! I found this bug while walking down the street and didn’t know what it was. It has very interesting antennae and seems like it should be fairly easy to identify but I cannot find it anywhere. I was just wondering if you could help me out. Thanks for your help!
Signature: Hannah

Cedar Beetle

Hi Hannah,
We looked at your photo last night and decided your entry would most likely take us some time to research, so we postponed until morning when our staff is fresh.  At first glance we thought this was some species of Scarab Beetle, but searching BugGuide proved fruitless.  We expanded the search to related families and we finally discovered the Cicada Parasite Beetles or Cedar Beetles in the genus
Sandalus, a new genus for our site, and the family RhipiceridaeAccording to BugGuide:  “Adults active primarily from Aug to Oct” and “Adults apparently do not feed.”  The most interesting information on BugGuide is “Species undergo hypermetamorphosis and are ectoparasitoids of nymphal cicadas (1) Species are infrequent to rare. (2) When encountered, often found in large numbers during the day, indicating that a pheromone was used. (1)  On one day in late September, near Bloomington, Ind., 12 specimens were collected on hickory trunks or in flight in just 1 hour. Collecting at the same time in the same place during previous years had yielded no specimens. It is likely that these beetles were parasites on the brood of periodical cicadas which had emerged the previous year. (2)  Rings (1942) recorded 16,846 eggs from a single female S. niger.”  We thought we would need to create a new category for our new species, but upon searching our own archives, we discovered this posting of a Feather Horned Beetle from Australia, also in the family Rhipiceridae.  In that particular posting, we wrote:  “If the closest relatives found in North America (see BugGuide) are known as Cicada Parasite Beetles, it might be deduced that the same might be true of the Australian members of the family since Australia has such a robust population of Cicadas.”  Thanks for sending us your photo and for starting our day with some exciting revelations.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Feather-horned beetle

Feather Horned Beetle

Feather-horned beetle
Location: Perth, Western Australia
April 18, 2011 7:18 pm
These are some of my photos, they look even better if you have a program that allows you to zoom in. Beautiful sunny autumn day in Perth, April 2011.
Signature: Kelly

Feather Horned Beetle

Dear Kelly,
We are positively thrilled to post all of your photos of the magnificent Feather Horned Beetle,
Rhipicera femoralis.  The only other images we have of Feather Horned Beetles were posted a few months ago.

Feather Horned Beetle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

What insect is this?
Location: Malaysia
March 10, 2011 1:32 pm
My friend found this at his house. no idea what this is. can you help identify it?
Signature: Michelle

Possibly Click Beetle

Hi Michelle,
This beetle sure has nice feathery antennae.  At first we thought it might be a Click Beetle, though most Click Beetles do not have such plumose antennaeOur 10,000th posting in May 2010 was a very similar looking beetle from Hawaii.  That beetle as well as your beetle might be
Callirhipis cardwellensis which may be seen on Flickr.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

What insect is this?
Location: Toowoomba Queensland Australia
January 20, 2011 3:47 am
Hi I was outside about to hang the clothes when I saw this strange peculiar insect on the line? I never seen such a funny looking insect with these big antennas. I thought it was such a wonderful looking thing that I had to grab the camera to get this on film. Lucky it was still there when I returned I was so delighted to see such an insect I have been so curious to find out what it was? Could you possibly know what it is? This was outside in Toowoomba Queensland Australia. Thank you.
Signature: Dazed and Amazed

Feather Horned Beetle

Dear Dazed and Amazed,
Those are some impressive antennae on this aptly named Feather Horned Beetle,
Rhipicera femoralis, in the family Rhipiceridae.  This is a new species, new family and new category for our website.  We identified your Feather Horned Beetle on the Life Unseen website which has some nice photos, but no information.  According to the Ausscape International Photo Library website, the Feather Horned Beetle is also called the Fan Horned Beetle.  One of the nicest images of the Feather Horned Beetle is on the Patti Flynn Soapmaker blogCsiro Entomology has the most information available to the general web browsing public, including:  “This small family has not been well studied in Australia and as a result little is known of their biology and ecology. There are only 6 species of Rhipiceridae in Australia and all belong to the genus Rhipicera. Adults range in size from 10 to 25 millimetres in length and can be recognised by their large fan-like antennae. The antennae of males are unusual in that they have more than 20 segments and arise from small knob-like prominences. Most species are grey-black in colour with white spots on the elytra and pronotum, formed by patches of hair.  The larvae of Australian species is unknown and in North America Sandalus niger is the only known rhipicerid larva. This larval species is grub-like and lightly sclerotised, with conical shaped antennae consisting of just one segment. The first instar are triungulin-like, meaning they appear similar to the larvae of blister beetles (Meloidae) which are long-legged and parasitic. The later instars are ectoparasitic on the nymphs of cicadas. It is thought the first instars of Sandalus niger attach themselves to the cicada nymphs before they enter the soil.”  If the closest relatives found in North America (see BugGuide) are known as Cicada Parasite Beetles, it might be deduced that the same might be true of the Australian members of the family since Australia has such a robust population of Cicadas.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination