Currently viewing the category: "Feather Horned and Cedar Beetles"

Subject:  Feather Horned Beetle
Date: 03/29/2021
Time: 10:39 PM EDT
Geographic location of the bug:  Toowoomba QLD 4350
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi,
I found this little guy on a friend’s driveway after returning from a walk this morning. He intrigued me,so I gently collected him in a jar and brought him home. Firstly we did a ‘photo shoot’, then I released him into my garden, then with the help of my daughter who I was telling about the bug over the phone, we dug up some information on this amazing insect, hence leading me to your website.
Thought you might like to see him, seeing they aren’t overly common.
How you want your letter signed:  Cindy

Feather Horned Beetle

Dear Cindy,
Thank you so much for submitting your awesome images of a Feather Horned Beetle to What’s That Bug?  We love posting beautiful images of amazing insects from around the world and we love educating the curious public about those “bugs”.  Daniel has been on hiatus for quite some time, and he is really excited to return to posting regularly to WTB?

Feather Horned Beetle

Good afternoon,
A delight to receive your reply.
I am excited to contact you again, as we have just returned from a long walk and in a suburb not far from home, we had to go under a tree overhanging the footpath. There was lots of bugs flying around it, then my daughter exclaims rather excitedly… ‘Mum, they’re your bugs, your eyelash bugs’. I was very excited and stood watching many flitting about.
The other coincidental thing is that last night my daughter was sitting quietly on the lounge, then all of a sudden she sprang off in fright whilst trying to get something off her neck. Thankfully she didn’t swat at it, as it was an eyelash bug that must have got caught in her very long curly red hair when we brought the washing in just prior.
It is obviously the season for these beautiful wonders of nature as they seem abundant in Toowoomba.
Thanks for your time.
Cindy Ryan

Subject:  Bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Perth Western Australia
Date: 05/02/2019
Time: 06:07 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Just loved the look of this bug. Not sure what it is never seen anything like it. Hope you like the photos. Would love to know more about it.
How you want your letter signed:  Babs Brennan

Feather Horned Beetle

Dear Babs,
We do love your images of a male Feather Horned Beetle,
Rhipicera femoralis.

Feather Horned Beetle

Subject:  Feather horned beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  Gondiwindi Qld
Date: 04/19/2018
Time: 06:44 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Not sure if you’re still interested in these submissions. I found this one on the clothesline also! They must pick up better signal on the old hillshoists.
How you want your letter signed:  Caleb

Feather Horned Beetle

Dear Caleb,
Your images of this Feather Horned Beetle,
Rhipicera femoralis, are positively gorgeous, and we always enjoy posting beautiful images.  According to biologist Dr. Carin Bondar on Facebook:  “Aren’t those antennae just amazing?  The large surface provides more space for chemoreceptors which are necessary to smell pheromones and find a partner.”

Feather Horned Beetle

Feather Horned Beetle

Subject:  Mating Cedar Beetles
Geographic Location of the Bug:  Littlefield Texas
October 14, 2017
Hi Daniel,
Here are the images I took of the Cedar Beetles. The last few are sort of hard to see but it is of the males surrounding the female. They were quite a way up the tree by that time. I’ll also send you a video or two but I need to watch them again to see which ones are easiest to see. I’ll send those soon..
Thanks,
Jackie

Mating Cedar Beetles

Subject (please be succinct, descriptive and specific):  Cedar Beetle
October 12, 2017
Through your site I discovered that I had found a Cedar Beetle. My husband and I are in Littlefield Texas for a few months for a job and this is where I found it. A few days later I went for a walk and saw a large amount of them flying around a tree in our backyard. It was very strange as there seemed to be only one female and the rest were males all trying to mate with her. I have several pictures and videos of them. If you are interested in seeing them I would be happy to send them to you. Also, the following day I was digging to plant a bush and dug up a female. She seemed fully formed but not quite ready for the outside world yet. I wasn’t sure if I should bury her or not so I put her under the bush I planted. A short time later, I saw two males buzzing around looking for her. Thanks for your time reading this and the work you put into this site!
Your Name:  Jacqueline Hook

Cedar Beetle Mating Frenzy

Dear Jackie,
Thanks so much for sending in your awesome images.  We have taken your original comment and created a new posting using your images of a Cedar Beetle Mating Frenzy.  Male Cedar Beetles have flabellate or fanlike antennae that help them locate a female once she releases her pheromones.

Female Cedar Beetle and 4 suitors

Subject:  Black beetle with fun antennae
Geographic location of the bug:  Kansas City
Date: 10/09/2017
Time: 07:18 PM EDT
Found this little beetle on my outside window. I love the antennae. Could you tell me please what this is?
How you want your letter signed:  TW

Male Cedar Beetle

Dear TW,
This is a male Cedar Beetle or Cicada Parasite Beetle,
Sandalus niger, which we identified on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide, they are present “mostly: Sept-Oct.”  Of the genus, BugGuide notes:  “antennae flabellate in males, serrate in females” and flabellate is an entomological term to describe fanlike antennae.

Male Cedar Beetle

A reader comments.
Subject (please be succinct, descriptive and specific):  Cedar Beetle
October 12, 2017
Through your site I discovered that I had found a Cedar Beetle. My husband and I are in Littlefield Texas for a few months for a job and this is where I found it. A few days later I went for a walk and saw a large amount of them flying around a tree in our backyard. It was very strange as there seemed to be only one female and the rest were males all trying to mate with her. I have several pictures and videos of them. If you are interested in seeing them I would be happy to send them to you. Also, the following day I was digging to plant a bush and dug up a female. She seemed fully formed but not quite ready for the outside world yet. I wasn’t sure if I should bury her or not so I put her under the bush I planted. A short time later, I saw two males buzzing around looking for her. Thanks for your time reading this and the work you put into this site!
Your Name:  Jacqueline Hook

Subject: Feather-Horned Beetle – Rhipicera femorata
Location: Mount Gambier, South Australia
February 23, 2017 1:06 am
Found this beautiful little man today while out taking photos. Its a male Rhipicera femorata. They are uncommon and little is known about them, and i thought you and your readers might enjoy some nice photos 🙂
Taken on 23/02/2017, Mount Gambier, South Australia
Signature: – Liam

Feather Horned Beetle

Dear Liam,
This is a very good morning for us.  Generally, the beginning of the year is not the busiest time for our site as winter envelops the northern hemisphere and most of our submissions are blurry images sent by desperate homemakers who find carpet beetles, stink bugs, bed bugs, cockroaches and other household intruders that they fear and loath.  Your submission is the third beautiful and wondrous posting for us today.  We really prefer posting images from people who appreciate the beauty of the lower beasts.  While Feather Horned Beetles are not new to our site, your images are especially lovely.  According to the Atlas of Living Australia:  “Adults may not feed, but fly readily in fine weather. During their short summer flight season, males greatly outnumber females; their flabellate antennae are presumably particularly sensitive to the female’s scent and help them to home in on her. The larvae are thought to be parasites of the nymphs of cicadas living in sandy soils.”  According to Featured Creature:  “The males differ from the females in that their anntenae are much larger and more pronounced. Those anntenae are unique due to the fact that they have more than 20 segments and arise from small knob-like prominences.”

Feather Horned Beetle