Currently viewing the category: "Feather Horned and Cedar Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Feather-Horned Beetle – Rhipicera femorata
Location: Mount Gambier, South Australia
February 23, 2017 1:06 am
Found this beautiful little man today while out taking photos. Its a male Rhipicera femorata. They are uncommon and little is known about them, and i thought you and your readers might enjoy some nice photos 🙂
Taken on 23/02/2017, Mount Gambier, South Australia
Signature: – Liam

Feather Horned Beetle

Dear Liam,
This is a very good morning for us.  Generally, the beginning of the year is not the busiest time for our site as winter envelops the northern hemisphere and most of our submissions are blurry images sent by desperate homemakers who find carpet beetles, stink bugs, bed bugs, cockroaches and other household intruders that they fear and loath.  Your submission is the third beautiful and wondrous posting for us today.  We really prefer posting images from people who appreciate the beauty of the lower beasts.  While Feather Horned Beetles are not new to our site, your images are especially lovely.  According to the Atlas of Living Australia:  “Adults may not feed, but fly readily in fine weather. During their short summer flight season, males greatly outnumber females; their flabellate antennae are presumably particularly sensitive to the female’s scent and help them to home in on her. The larvae are thought to be parasites of the nymphs of cicadas living in sandy soils.”  According to Featured Creature:  “The males differ from the females in that their anntenae are much larger and more pronounced. Those anntenae are unique due to the fact that they have more than 20 segments and arise from small knob-like prominences.”

Feather Horned Beetle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Black Insect
Location: Grenada, Caribbean
January 20, 2016 5:42 pm
Saw this bug in my room one night, was wondering what it was with its curious antennae.
Signature: donnwestt

Click Beetle, we believe

Click Beetle, we believe

Dear donnwestt,
We believe this is a Click Beetle in the family Elateridae, and though we can link to similar looking individuals with feathered antennae from other countries like this Click Beetle from Uganda or this Click Beetle from Los Angeles, we have not been able to locate any similar looking individuals from the Caribbean or South America.  We would not rule out that it might be a Feather Horned Beetle in the family Callirhipidae like this individual pictured on ShutterAsia.  We will attempt to do more research on your beetle including getting an opinion from Eric Eaton.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Feather Horned Beetle
Location: Perth, WA, Australia
May 2, 2015 11:34 pm
My daughter found this beetle in our backyard. We did have a smaller beetle without the fancy antennae but by the time I got the camera the smaller beetle had disappeared.
We were able to identify it from your site and thought that you may be interested.
Signature: Chris McMillan

Feather Horned Beetle

Feather Horned Beetle

Dear Chris,
Your images of a Feather Horned Beetle,
Rhipicera femoralis, are an excellent addition to our archive.

Feather Horned Beetle

Feather Horned Beetle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Feather Horned Beetle
Location: Toowoomba, Queensland
April 9, 2015 9:01 pm
I have identified the unusual critter from my photo, from a previous posting on your website.
Thank you for satisfying my curiosity. I just thought I’d forward my photos to you as well.
Photo was taken 6 April 2015.
Signature: Leanne W.

Feather Horned Beetle

Feather Horned Beetle

Dear Leanne,
Thanks so much for sending in your gorgeous images of a Feather Horned Beetle,
Rhipicera femoralis.

Feather Horned Beetle

Feather Horned Beetle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Fuzzy antenna beetle
Location: Lorain, Ohio
September 23, 2014 12:34 pm
I found this beetle flying around my porch. There was another one (I’m guessing female, due to its lack of fan-like antenna) sitting on the side of my house.
The back of their abdomen is orange.
It is currently early autumn.
Signature: Candice

Male Cedar Beetle

Male Cedar Beetle

Dear Candice,
We are very excited about your submission.  WE believe you have documented images of both a male and female Cedar Beetle,
Sandalus niger, an identification we verified on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide, they are found “Mostly: Sept-Oct” and “Larvae probably feed on Cycada nymphs. Adults very short lived.”

Female Cedar Beetle

Female Cedar Beetle

Female Cedar Beetle

Female Cedar Beetle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Feather Horned Beetle
Location: Phillip Island, Victoria, Australia
March 23, 2014 12:03 am
Hey Bugman,
Came across a Feather Horned Beetle today on a walk around Berry’s Beach and Pyramid Rock on Phillip Island Victoria, Australia. Your site allowed me to determine what it was, and noticed you didn’t have many photos so here’s one for your collection 🙂
Cheers,
Signature: Lauren

Feather Horned Beetle

Feather Horned Beetle

Dear Lauren,
Your Feather Horned Beetle,
Rhipicera femoralis, is a wonderful addition to our archives.  Thank you so much for sending in a photo of a magnificent species that you had already self-identified.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination