Currently viewing the category: "Checkered Beetles"

Not a Lady Bug, but a ???
November 23, 2009, 5:52 PM
Found this beetle bug dying in our house today. I have noticed several of these beetles on the vinyl siding of our house, but this is the first one I have seen inside. We recently treated our carpets with pyrethrins as the kitty brought flees in with her. The pics were taken as the beetle was dying and penny added for scale.
A bit more info about our location. We are in central Kentucky and recently bought a house that backs up to a farm that has planted soy beans for the past two years.
Any help ID’ing this critter would be greatly appreciated as I want to make sure it is not a destructive type of pest.
Worried in KY
Central KY

Checkered Beetle

Checkered Beetle

Found it!
6:04 PMNovember 23, 2009
Found the info about the beetle that came inside and died. It is a checkered beetle and I am assuming that since we had an ice storm last year they are feeding on the wood borers that are chewing on the dead wood in the tree line between our house and the soybean field. Thank you for your help!
Not Worried in KY
Central KY

Checkered Beetle

Checkered Beetle

Dear Not Worried in KY, formerly Worried in KY,
We are thrilled to see that within 12 minutes, you correctly identified your Checkered Beetle on our website.  More information on the Checkered Beetle family Cleridae can be found on BugGuide.

Update:  July 24, 2016
While attempting to identify a newly submitted Checkered Beetle, we realized this individual also appears to be
Enoclerus ichneumoneus.

Beautiful Red Beetle
July 15, 2009
I’ve seen these small active red beetles in Oklahoma woodlands all of my life, over 50 years, but never have identified them. They are very showy and run or fly readily to escape. They are active in the hottest times of the summer in the daytime. I found this one in mid-July in central Oklahoma on a 105 F degree-day. I’ve never seen them in groups only as singles. It’s about a third of an inch long.
K. Hopkins
Oklahoma, USA

Checkered Beetle

Checkered Beetle

Dear K.,
We didn’t realize we were answering two of your letters back to back.  This is a Checkered Beetle, Enoclerus ichneumoneus. You may find matching images on BugGuide.  After opening five different large files for your photographs, the photo instructor in us feels compelled to tell you that you have a lot of visual noise.  Try changing the sensitivity to light (ISO) or some other resolution factor which is causing your otherwise marvelous images to be degraded.

small, rust-colored but with black stripes/markings around tail
Thu, Apr 23, 2009 at 3:32 PM
I was outside and a small (maybe 1/2″) bug flew into my shirt. It may have bitten me, but I’m not sure. It’s rust-colored with some black stripes or markings around its tail. It has wings. I’ve attached a photo of it. I’ve never seen a bug like this before. Could it be poisonous? Do you think it could have bitten me? Thanks for any help you can provide.
Anne
Nashville, TN

Checkered Beetle

Checkered Beetle

Hi Anne,
We are always amused at the number of people who write to us wanting “buts” identified.  This is one of the most commonly encountered species of Checkered Beetles, Enoclerus nigripes.  It is entirely possible that it bit you, but Checkered Beetles do not bite people except when threatened.  They are not poisonous.  BugGuide has numerous nice images of this species.

Burying beetle?
Hi Bugman. So, I was watching this crab spider (under petal) on a Sego lily in the badlands near Douglas, WY when the flower was briefly visited by this guy. Is it a Burying beetle? You guys rock!
Dwaine

Hi again Dwaine,
We believe this is an Ornate Checkered Beetle, Trichodes ornatus, which seems to be the closest match on BugGuide. Some species in the family feed on pollen, which would explain its appearance on the blossom.

We’re Stumped
Hi, Bug Man –
Last summer, we took a family vacation to Colorado. My daughter, a budding entomologist through 4-H, was excited about looking for any unusual insects that we don’t see in Indiana. Low and behold, we found just that. After getting them home in one piece, we are unable to identify either one. The first photo is some kind of water bug we found in a fountain in Boulder. We didn’t think it was a giant water bug nymph because the wings look developed. It’s about an inch an a quarter long. The second photo of the beetle has a story. We found this guy on top of our car after lunch in Colorado Springs. He went into a zip lock bag with another colorful beetle find. An hour later, we checked on our catch, only to find out that this beetle had eaten the other – so, we know it’s predaceous. The photo isn’t great, but the distinguishing features are the red abdomen with two symmetrical black spots. It’s about 5/8 of an inch long.
Thanks!
Becky

Hi Becky,
Your Water Bug is in the genus Belostoma, and they are sometimes called the Ferocious Water Bugs. The other photo is not detailed enough to be able to quickly identify it. We suspect it might be a species of Checkered Beetle in the family Cleridae, but not one we recognize. Eric Eaton provided this information: “The checkered beetle with the toe biter is indeed a checkered beetle, family Cleridae. Many kinds of checkered beetles are valuable predators of bark beetles.”

Update:  May 31, 2016
Thanks to a comment that just arrived, we can provide a link to the Handsome Yucca Beetle, a species of Checkered Beetle, on BugGuide.

Carrion beetle?
Hi Bugman –
Here are four pictures I took under my microscope. This beetle was found in a dermestid beetle culture by a taxidermist friend who does skull cleaning like myself. At first I thought it was a small carrion beetle Leptodiridae but it doesn’t have the small 8th antenna segment, Distinguishing features seem to be the clubbed antenna, protruding abdominal segments, hairy surface, metallic green (blusish) with reddish legs, tarsal code is 3-3-3 I think. Can you help with this. It’s quite beautiful. The beetle pictures I sent – the specimen was 5.5 mm long. Thanks.
Dr Whitey
Science Teacher; Clinton Tennessee

Hi Dr, Whitey,
We are very happy to get your photo of a Red Legged Ham Beetle, Necrobius rufipes. Here is a quote from the BugPeople Site: “This beetle was more important before refrigeration, when dried or smoked meats were more common. Larvae bore into meats, particularly the fat parts, do most of the damage; the adults are surface feeders. The redlegged ham beetle has also been recorded attacking cheese, bones, hides, drying carrion, copra, salt fish, herring, dried egg yolks, dried figs, “guano”, bone meal, palm-nut kernels, and Egyptian mummies. Substances infested but not fed upon have been silk, baled cotton, and woolen goods. “