Currently viewing the category: "Blister Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Identify this bug?
Geographic location of the bug:  Columbus, N.M.
Date: 11/08/2019
Time: 10:00 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  We are on the border of New Mexico and saw this bug about the approx  size of a quarter.
How you want your letter signed:  Gaila

Blister Beetle: Megetra species

Dear Gaila,
This is a Blister Beetle in the genus
Megetra and we identified it on BugGuide.  There are three species in the genus, and two are found in New Mexico, but they look so similar, we cannot discern a difference.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unidentified beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  Winnipeg mb Canada
Date: 08/07/2019
Time: 06:32 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I took this photo June 24,2019, there is a interpretative centre where I took the pic with research material and I looked online and cannot identify it, The closest I found was a Festive Tiger Beetle but no where close enough. I spoke to an entomologist still no luck.   Any assistance will be appreciated. Thank you
How you want your letter signed:  Steve Baxter

Nuttall’s Blister Beetle

Dear Steve,
Your images are positively gorgeous, and they beautifully represent this Nuttall’s Blister Beetle,
Lytta nuttalli, which is pictured on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Adults feed on legumes” and the flower in your image does look to us like a legume.  Blister Beetles in the family Meloidae should be handled with caution as many species can exude hemolymph containing the blistering compound cantharidin.  The infamous aphrodesiac Spanish Fly is produced by crushing the bodies of a Spanish Blister Beetle.

Nuttall’s Blister Beetle

Thank you for the information. I have recently retired and bought a new camera and a macro lens and discovered  there really are a lot of interesting insects. I am enclosing a couple interesting photos, 1 a great picture of a Monarch butterfly, and the second which I didn’t notice the ladybug is chowing down the aphids on the plant. Thanks again for your assistance.
Steve
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unknown beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  Lostwood national wildlife refuge North west North Dakota
Date: 07/13/2019
Time: 05:23 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman :  Unable to find this beetle in any North Dakota books.
How you want your letter signed:  Thank you

Nuttail’s Blister Beetle

This is a Blister Beetle in the family Meloidae, and based on this BugGuide image, it appears to be Nuttail’s Blister Beetle.  According to BugGuide:  “Adults feed on legumes, other forbs.”

Nuttail’s Blister Beetle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Swarm of Green Beetles
Geographic location of the bug:  Warren, ME
Date: 07/08/2019
Time: 05:44 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This swarm of green beetles just showed up today, filling our Hawthorne tree and falling all over our deck. My dog ate one and now I’m terrified they are poisonous. They look a bit like Emerald Ash Borer pics that I’ve seen. We run a large 163 acre organic farm, so if this thing is going to attack crops, I’d like to know and try to prevent damage. Right now it only seems to care about the Hawthorne blossoms…
How you want your letter signed:  Farm Dog in Maine

Blister Beetle: Lytta sayi

Dear Farm Dog in Maine,
This is a Blister Beetle in the family Meloidae, and based on BugGuide images, we are confident it is
Lytta sayi.  According to BugGuide:  “beetles feed largely on various flowers; larvae have been reared from cells of Agapostemon virescens.”   Blister Beetles are fascinating insects with complex life cycles.  The larvae of most species feed on either Grasshoppers or Solitary Bees.  Many Blister Beetles are able to secrete a compound known as cantharidin that is known to cause blistering in human skin and there are reports of horses sickening and even dying from accidentally ingesting Blister Beetles while eating hay.  Of the family, BugGuide notes:  “Pressing, rubbing, or squashing blister beetles may cause them to exude hemolymph which contains the blistering compound cantharidin. Ingestion of blister beetles can be fatal. Eating blister beetles with hay may kill livestock. Cantharidin is commercially known as Spanish Fly.”

Thank you so much for the prompt and accurate identification and additional information!  We will certainly keep our pets and kids away from them!
Jamien
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Is this an invasive bug?
Geographic location of the bug:  Jay Vermont
Date: 06/15/2019
Time: 10:43 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found today Jun 15, 2019 in short grass along driveway, close to a wooded area of Vermont.
How you want your letter signed:  Heather

Oil Beetle

Dear Heather,
This is an Oil Beetle in the genus Meloe, and it is native, not invasive.

Thanks so much!  This is our new favorite bug.  He did squirt some yellow stuff on my garden tool and I assumed it was hurt so just put it back where I found it.  Awesome.
Heather

Hi again Heather,
We would advise you to handle Oil Beetles as well as other Blister Beetles in the family Meloidae with caution because, according to BugGuide:  “Pressing, rubbing, or squashing blister beetles may cause them to exude hemolymph which contains the blistering compound cantharidin. Ingestion of blister beetles can be fatal. Eating blister beetles with hay may kill livestock. Cantharidin is commercially known as Spanish Fly.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Photos of Desert Spider Beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  Albuquerque New Mexico
Date: 06/13/2019
Time: 10:58 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Just wanted to share these good images of the Desert Spider Beetle.
How you want your letter signed:  Chris Krupar

Desert Spider Beetle

Dear Chris,
Thanks for submitting your images of a Desert Spider Beetle.  According to BugGuide, the species found in New Mexico is
Cysteodemus wislizeni.

Desert Spider Beetle

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination