Currently viewing the category: "Blister Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Texas beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  Big Bend N.P.
Date: 04/14/2021
Time: 05:36 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Can you identify these beetles found feeding on Lupine?
How you want your letter signed:  H2oggre

Blister Beetle: Lytta cribrata

Dear H2oggre,
Thanks for sending multiple camera angles of your Blister Beetle in the family Meloidae.  We believe based on this BugGuide image that it is Lytta cribrata, but we would not rule out a different species in the genus.  It is described on BugGuide as: “Pronotoum black at center, broadly orange at sides; head with a diamond-shaped orange frontal spot” and its range is listed as:  “sw. TX (Chinati Mts and Eagle Pass), Mexico (Chihuahua, Durango).”  Does that match your location in Texas?

Blister Beetle: Lytta cribrata

Thank you Daniel.
Yes it does match Chihuahuan desert area. I need to look up what the “Pronotoum” is, though. If is the center “thorax section” [before the black section with its wings; yet behind the red and black section with its eyes and antennae] that fits the description. It certainly matched the color markings if that is what I think the pronotoum is.
The lobed antennae seemed to me rather distinctive as does the y-shaped pincer tipped legs. Any mention of those in the description of Lytta cribrate?
Plus the wings are very textured. That is not dew on the surface.
I really appreciate your help Daniel.
Richard Todd

Blister Beetle: Lytta cribrata

Good morning Richard.  The Pronotum is defined on BugGuide as:  ” the upper surface of the prothorax, the first segment of the thorax. Shape of the pronotum is often important in identification of beetles, and many other groups.”  While Coleopterists, entomologists who specialize in Beetles, have an extensive vocabulary of terms they use to describe characteristics, we believe punctate, which is defined on BugGuide as “marked by spots, dots, points, depressions, or punctures” could be used to describe the texture of the elytra or wing covers on the Blister Beetles you observed.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Blue beetle?
Geographic location of the bug:  West Virginia
Date: 04/05/2021
Time: 08:09 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  What is this guy?!
How you want your letter signed:  Marion Sophia

Oil Beetle

Dear Marion,
This is a Blister Beetle in the genus
Meloe commonly called an Oil Beetle.  According to BugGuide, there are 22 North American species and we do not have the required qualifications to provide you with a species.  We do know that some species are found in the spring and others in the fall.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Found beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  Golden Shores AZ
Date: 03/28/2020
Time: 12:39 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I’d like to know what kind of beetle this is
How you want your letter signed:  Please and thank you

Inflated Beetle

We have identified your beetle, Cysteodemus armatus, on BugGuide.  It is commonly called a Desert Spider Beetle or an Inflated Beetle.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Identify this bug?
Geographic location of the bug:  Columbus, N.M.
Date: 11/08/2019
Time: 10:00 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  We are on the border of New Mexico and saw this bug about the approx  size of a quarter.
How you want your letter signed:  Gaila

Blister Beetle: Megetra species

Dear Gaila,
This is a Blister Beetle in the genus
Megetra and we identified it on BugGuide.  There are three species in the genus, and two are found in New Mexico, but they look so similar, we cannot discern a difference.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unidentified beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  Winnipeg mb Canada
Date: 08/07/2019
Time: 06:32 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I took this photo June 24,2019, there is a interpretative centre where I took the pic with research material and I looked online and cannot identify it, The closest I found was a Festive Tiger Beetle but no where close enough. I spoke to an entomologist still no luck.   Any assistance will be appreciated. Thank you
How you want your letter signed:  Steve Baxter

Nuttall’s Blister Beetle

Dear Steve,
Your images are positively gorgeous, and they beautifully represent this Nuttall’s Blister Beetle,
Lytta nuttalli, which is pictured on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Adults feed on legumes” and the flower in your image does look to us like a legume.  Blister Beetles in the family Meloidae should be handled with caution as many species can exude hemolymph containing the blistering compound cantharidin.  The infamous aphrodesiac Spanish Fly is produced by crushing the bodies of a Spanish Blister Beetle.

Nuttall’s Blister Beetle

Thank you for the information. I have recently retired and bought a new camera and a macro lens and discovered  there really are a lot of interesting insects. I am enclosing a couple interesting photos, 1 a great picture of a Monarch butterfly, and the second which I didn’t notice the ladybug is chowing down the aphids on the plant. Thanks again for your assistance.
Steve
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unknown beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  Lostwood national wildlife refuge North west North Dakota
Date: 07/13/2019
Time: 05:23 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman :  Unable to find this beetle in any North Dakota books.
How you want your letter signed:  Thank you

Nuttail’s Blister Beetle

This is a Blister Beetle in the family Meloidae, and based on this BugGuide image, it appears to be Nuttail’s Blister Beetle.  According to BugGuide:  “Adults feed on legumes, other forbs.”

Nuttail’s Blister Beetle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination