Currently viewing the category: "Beetles"

Subject:  Mystery beetle on my window in Bali
Geographic location of the bug:  Canggu, Bali, Indonesia
Date: 10/18/2021
Time: 10:47 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I saw this bug, it is maybe a longhorn beetle of some sort? I’ve never seen one before!
How you want your letter signed:  Tommy

Longicorn from Bali

Dear Tommy,
This is indeed a Longicorn in the family Cerambycidae, but we are uncertain of the species.  We will continue to research its identity.  The very long antennae
seem to indicate this is a male.

Subject:  Maybe a beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  Southwest Washington state
Date: 10/19/2021
Time: 12:30 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Initially looks like a beetle but what looks to be wings aren’t shaped and only go down half the body
How you want your letter signed:  Doesn’t matter. Thanks for the identification

Oil Beetle

This is indeed a Beetle.  More specifically, it is a Blister Beetle in the genus Meloe, commonly called an Oil Beetle.

Subject:  What is this!?
Geographic location of the bug:  Trenton, Ontario, Canada
Date: 10/25/2021
Time: 09:33 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  While out with my kids at the park we found a few of these bugs and have no idea what they could be !
How you want your letter signed:  The bug man

Oil Beetle

This is a Blister Beetle in the genus Meloe, a group commonly called Oil Beetles.  We are posting this on the seventh anniversary of this previous Oil Beetle posting from Ontario. 

Subject:  Large Coleoptera larcae
Geographic location of the bug:  Monteagle TN
Date: 10/24/2021
Time: 11:07 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found a large beetle larva while walking the dog tonight.
I would like to submit picture for iNaturalist but am stumped on ID. I have seen this species before.
How you want your letter signed:  Chris Waldrup

Railroad Worm

Dear Chris,
This is the larva of a Glowworm Beetle, commonly called a Railroad Worm because of its ability to glow green in the dark as an example of bioluminescence.  We believe your individual is in the genus
Phengodes based on BugGuide images.  Here is a BugGuide image of a Glowing Glowworm.

Subject:  trachyderes succinctus
Geographic location of the bug:  Trinidad
Date: 10/15/2021
Time: 01:51 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I think this is the trachyderes succinctus, can you confirm?
Also, is it venemous?
How you want your letter signed:  Mike

Longicorn: Trachyderes succinctus

Dear Mike,
Your Longicorn is indeed
Trachyderes succinctus and it is not venomous.  According to Jungle Dragon:  ” It was described by Linnaeus in 1758.”

Subject:  I want to know what kind of Rhinoceros beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  Bear, DE
Date: 09/26/2021
Time: 12:57 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi, I found the Rhinoceros   beetles 2days in a row at my yard. But I don’t know what kind of it. I’m so curious which Rhinoceros beetle they are.
I found the first one at 9/24. It was belly up when I found it. So I thought it was dead at first. But it actually moved slowly when I poked with a mulch stick. So I took it to the tree.
This one was dark brown on the left side and there were white point on the right side and head part.
The second one had more white base and brown connected dot design.
They were both cute. Then both had the blond bangs and it was so cool.
I wanna teach my son about that beetle. But I don’t know the name. So please teach me what kind of Rhinoceros beetle.
Thank you!
How you want your letter signed:  Miso-sugar

Male Eastern Hercules Beetle

Dear Miso-sugar,
The easiest way to avoid the confusion of duplicative common names that may differ from region to region is to call insects by their accepted scientific binomial name, and in the case of your submitted Rhinoceros Beetles, they are male
Dynastes tityus, a species with several different common names, though we most often call them Eastern Hercules Beetles.  According to BugGuide, other common names are “Rhinoceros Beetle, Unicorn Beetle” so your initial identification is also acceptable.  This species can be highly variable, and according to BugGuide they are described as:  “Huge size, greenish elytra with variable amounts of dark spots. Some are nearly black. Male has massive horns projecting forward from head and pronotum.”  This is the heaviest beetle in North America.

AKA: Rhinoceros Beetle

Another male Eastern Hercules Beetle