Currently viewing the category: "Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Zimbabwe harare
Date: 01/21/2018
Time: 02:35 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Clusters of this bug can only be found on one tree in our garden.  Demolishing the leaf to a skeleton before moving on.  They have been here for 2 weeks now with no sign of lying eyes or making cocoons
How you want your letter signed:  Di

Tortoise Beetle Larvae, we believe

Dear Di,
These are NOT Caterpillars, the larvae of butterflies or moths.  Rather, they are beetle larvae.  We suspect they are Leaf Beetle larvae or more specifically Tortoise Beetle larvae from the subfamily Cassidinae.  Knowing the tree would be of tremendous assistance to providing an actual species identification.  The look like the Fool’s Gold Beetle larvae pictured on BioDiversity Explorer, but that would mean your tree is actually a shrub in the family Solanaceae.

Tortoise Beetle larvae we believe

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Grub
Geographic location of the bug:  San Diego coastal 15″ below ground
Date: 01/20/2018
Time: 08:00 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I’ve never encountered a grub so large before and would like to know what kind of beetle this will become.
How you want your letter signed:  Matt Lee

Prionid Larva

Dear Matt,
This appears to be one of the Root Borers in the subfamily Prioninae.  Was there a tree or shrub nearby, or perhaps the trunk of something that had died?  While we are reluctant to provide a definitive species identification, it might be the larva of a California Root Borer like this image posted to BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae: Up to 80mm long” and “Larva feed primarily on living deciduous trees (oaks, madrone, cottonwood) and are also recorded from roots of vines, grasses, and decomposing hardwoods and conifers. Will also attack fruit trees growing on light, well-drained soils (e.g. apple, cherry, peach).”  If that is a correct identification, here is an image of an adult male California Root Borer, though your larva might belong to a different, though similarly large Prionid with long antennae. 

Prionid Larva

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  Graaf Reniet, South Africa
Date: 01/21/2018
Time: 12:24 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found this interesting beetle at the Valley of Desolation outside Graaf Reniet in South Africa. The thorax and abdomen are perfectly round and the legs are grey,  not black. I have not been able to find it on the Internet.
How you want your letter signed:  Andy Smith

Tok-Tokkie

Dear Andy,
This is a Darkling Beetle in the family Tenebrionidae, and we believe it is one of a group from South Africa known as Tok-Tokkies, and according to Urban Ministry Live and Unplugged:  “It is called a tok-tokkie because it communicates with other beetles through tapping on the ground. It is a harmless, good-natured beetle.”  You can find a similar looking Tok-Tokkie on FlickRiver, and similar looking individuals are pictured on iSpot where it is identified as a member of the genus
Psammodes, and in this iSpot image, the gray legs you observed are quite evident.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Beetle South Africa?
Geographic location of the bug:  Durban, South Africa
Date: 01/13/2018
Time: 02:28 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear bug people
It is mid summer here in Durban, South Africa and this little guy just landed on my patio. I am always keen to identify the creatures in my garden, from bugs to birds.
Hope to hear from you.
Many thanks.
How you want your letter signed:  Kevin C

Flower Chafer

Dear Kevin,
This is a Scarab Beetle in the family Scarabaeidae, and we believe it is in the subfamily Cetoniinae, the Fruit and Flower Chafers, however we could not find a matching image on Beetles of Africa or on iSpot.  Perhaps one of our readers will have better luck than we have had.

Update:  Thanks to a comment from Cesar Crash, we believe this is a Flower Chafer, Porphyronota maculatissima, which is pictured on Flower Beetles and on BeetleSpace.

Thank you. Much appreciated for your time and feedback.
Regards
Kevin

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Jewel Beetle Tanzania
Geographic location of the bug:  West Kilimanjaro, Tanzania
Date: 01/14/2018
Time: 05:36 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Could you tell me what species as well as common name this is?
How you want your letter signed:  Doug

Jewel Beetle from Tanzania

Dear Doug,
We believe we can identify your beetle as a member of the genus
Steraspis.  Our first clue is this image from Zimbabwe posted to FlickR that is identified only as Steraspis species.  We have a similar looking Jewel Beetle from Jordan which we identified as Steraspis squamosa.  We found a mention in the online book “Forest Entomology in East Africa:  Forest Insects of Tanzania” that includes a mention of Steraspis speciosa fastuosa stating “This borer was observed gumming eggs onto the bark of Elaeodendron and Cassia fistula and larvae were boring directly into the wood causing much exudation of gums in the former.”  We searched for images of Steraspis speciosa fastuosa and found this Facebook posting from Insect Art of collected individuals and the note that “they weren’t nearly as metallic as the ones I get from this guy in Africa.”  We found a posting on jcringerbach.free of Steraspis squamosa that looks very similar, but the range is listed as “Sahara north of Sahel from Red Sea to Mauritania. Algeria, Morocco, Fazzan, Egypt, Syria” so it makes sense that a similar looking member of the genus might be found in sub-Saharan Africa.  Jcringenbach.free also has images of Steraspis speciosa and the range is listed as “Saharan Algeria and Morocco, Fazzan, Egypt, Arabia and tropical Africa to Mozambic” and since Mozambique is south of Tanzania, we presume it is part of the range.  The food plants listed are “Acacia nilotica and tortilis” and the plant in your image looks like an Acacia.  So we are relatively confident your beetle is in the genus Steraspis, and it might be Steraspis speciosa, and there is no common name we could locate except the general family name of Jewel Beetle.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Red bug Santa Elena
Geographic location of the bug:  Santa Elena Reserve, Costa Rica
Date: 01/11/2018
Time: 06:57 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Been trying to identify this bug I’ve found, but can’t seem to find the right species. I came across this beauty while hiking in the Monteverde Cloud Forest. Could you help me out?
How you want your letter signed:  Nick

Palmetto Weevil

Dear Nick,
This sure looks to us like the highly variable Palmetto Weevil or Red Palm Weevil,
Rhynchophorus cruentatus, based on this image posted to BugGuide.  According to Revolvy:  “The adult beetles are relatively large, ranging between two and four centimeters long, and are usually a rusty red colour—but many colour variants exist and have often been classified as different species” and “Weevil larvae can excavate holes in the trunk of a palm trees up to a metre long, thereby weakening and eventually killing the host plant. As a result, the weevil is considered a major pest in palm plantations, including the coconut palm, date palm and oil palm.”

Daniel,
Thank you so much for identifying the bug! Also, Palmetto Weevil is a more than lovely name.
I’ll add this to my list of animals I’ve found on my trip.
Thanks again,
Nick
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination