Currently viewing the category: "Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this beetle?
Geographic location of the bug:  League City, Texas
Date: 10/22/2017
Time: 12:24 AM EDT
These beetles have infested my towel closet in the bathroom (20-50 bugs).  I’ve fogged the room and it killed some, but they showed up again in 48 hours, primarily in the towels, but some are crawling along the floor.  They are tiny, about 1/5 the size of rice grain. What are these things?
How you want your letter signed:  CR and bugs

Bark Beetles we believe

Dear CR,
Based on the University of Minnesota Extension site, these look like Bark Beetles in the family Scolytidae, that are described as “small (1/8-¼ inch long), robust reddish brown to black insects. They are very common in the landscape, and can emerge from many types of wood brought into homes.”  Is your towel closet made of cedar?  Though there are many species of similar looking Bark Beetles, your individuals resemble the Cedar Bark Beetle pictured on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What’s this bug?
Geographic location of the bug:  Cape Town, South Africa
Date: 10/22/2017
Time: 09:19 AM EDT
Saw this yesterday in our garden just chilling in the sun. Never seen anything like this before. After some research almost looks like an Elepant Weevil however it isn’t natuve to South Africa. Can you confirm or help identify please?
How you want your letter signed:  Michelle

Weevil

Dear Michelle,
This is definitely a Weevil or Snout Beetle in the family Curculionidae, and though we could not locate a similar looking individual on iSpot, we do have an unidentified Weevil from South Africa that looks very similar in our archives.

Weevil

Many thanks Daniel for the prompt response.
I will continue to search and will update you if we find anything new
regards
Michelle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What bug is this?
Geographic location of the bug:  Lampedusa, Italy
Date: 10/22/2017
Time: 08:14 AM EDT
I’m currently staying on the island of Lampedusa and seeing some unfamiliar bugs. This was has just appeared on my balcony – I thought it some kind of bee at first but on closer inspection looks more like a furry beetle.
Also, am I better off leaving it or relocating it to an area with shrubs etc?
How you want your letter signed:  Mike

Bumblebee Scarab

Dear Mike,
We are nearly certain that this is a Bumblebee Scarab in the family Glaphyridae.  Here is a Project Noah image of a member of the family and PICSSR has a nice image by YM Zhang that looks very similar to your individual.  Forum Entomologi Italiani has numberous images of members of this family, including this image of
Pygopleurus apicalis.  If you send your images to them and you get a response, please let us know.  According to The Scarabs of the Levant:  “Except for a few species, life histories of the glaphyrids are poorly documented. Adults are often brightly colored, densely setose, active diurnally, and strong fliers. Many species have colored setal bands on the abdomen and resemble various Hymenoptera (bumble bees and metallic bees). They are frequenting flowers (often red Ranuncolacee and Tulipa) and foliage.”

Bumblebee Scarab

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Beetle eating banana slug Southeast Alaska
Geographic location of the bug:  Juneau, AK
Date: 10/22/2017
Time: 02:03 PM EDT
Hi there! I see these beetles wandering the ground and on and under rotten logs all over Southeast Alaska and the rainforests of the Pacific Northwest (WA, OR, British Columbia) and I have not been able to ID them! They have these wonderful purpleish abdomens and are maybe an inch long or less. This one was found with a baby banana slug in its jaws! What is it?
How you want your letter signed:  Thanks! -Mike J

Snail Eating Ground Beetle with immature Banana Slug

Dear Mike,
Your image is gorgeous.  We have several images on our site of Snail Hunters or Snail Eating Ground Beetles in the genus
Scaphinotus, but your image is the only one showing its preferred prey.  According to BugGuide:  “55 spp. in 9 subgenera total, all in our area.”  Several species are known from Alaska, including Scaphinotus angusticollis which is pictured on BugGuide and Scaphinotus marginatus which is also pictured on BugGuide.  Both species look very similar to your individual and we are not confident enough to provide an exact species identification for you.  According to Bugs of the Month:  “Scaphinotus angusticollis is large (satisfyingly so) and black, with a beauteous purple or greenish sheen in sunlight. The thorax is peculiarly shaped, turned up at the outer edges (a bit like a satellite dish), the legs are quite long and slender and the head is distinctly narrow and elongate. Truly the Afghan hound of the carabid world. The narrow head is an adaptation to eating snails from the shell. Now there are shelled snails in forests around these parts, but with forest clearing and the introduction of non-native pests, shelled snails are less frequent and slugs abound.”

Wow thank you for the thorough reply! They really are quite beautiful, and now I know that the beetles I see eating snails and on the ground are snail eating ground beetles 🙂 You are right, those two species are nearly identical, I guess if I was on the spotI would tell someone it was Angusticolus.

Thanks again!
Stay Curious

Mike Justa
Wildlife Naturalist
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Some type of longhorned beetle, which one?
Geographic location of the bug:  Bangalore, India
Date: 10/21/2017
Time: 01:19 PM EDT
Greetings Bugman!
I found this fellow, dead under a Ficus Religiosa, in Bangalore, India. Actually, I visit this tree, post lunch everyday. I had noticed this on the branches, often.
The images are on Google drive:  https://drive.google.com/folderview?id=0B06-CTLQ5A2UellYdjB0dHo1SzA
How you want your letter signed:  Naveen

Longicorn

Dear Naveen,
This is truly an impressive Longicorn, and its antennae are amazing.  We did not find anything similar on Prioninae of the World, but we might have missed it.  We will continue to attempt a species identification for you.

Longicorn

Longicorn

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination
Subject:  What beetle is this?  It hisses!
Geographic Location of the Bug:  Smith Mountain Lake, Virginia
Date:  October 19, 2017
Time:  10:39:19 AM EDT
Hi Dan,
Found this beetle in my barn in S.M.L. Va. Very pretty, shinny, and if you pick it up it hisses. So kool. Would you please let me know what kind of beetle this is? Love your website, thanks for all you and staff do to educate everyone!
Thanks Hairy Mary

Bess Beetle

Dear Hairy Mary,
This is a Bess Beetle in the family Passalidae.  According to BugGuide:  “Lifestyle of this family is unique for beetles: live in small colonies where larvae are cared for by adults of both sexes. Long life cycle, apparently more than one year. Larvae eat a rotting wood pre-chewed by adults. (Some references state larvae eat feces of adults as well.) Larvae and adults also cannibalize injured larvae.  Adults reported to fly very seldom, however they are capable of flight, contrary to statements in some sources. Adults are found at lights on occasion. They may disperse by walking, but have been observed flying under lights. …  Both adults and larvae stridulate, and this is said to serve as communication between them. Adults also stridulate when picked up, and especially, blown on. Adults stridulate by rubbing abdomen against the wings. Larvae stridulate with reduced third pair of legs–these scratch against other legs.”  The hissing sound you heard was the stridulation.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination