Currently viewing the category: "Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Texas beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  Big Bend N.P.
Date: 04/14/2021
Time: 05:36 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Can you identify these beetles found feeding on Lupine?
How you want your letter signed:  H2oggre

Blister Beetle: Lytta cribrata

Dear H2oggre,
Thanks for sending multiple camera angles of your Blister Beetle in the family Meloidae.  We believe based on this BugGuide image that it is Lytta cribrata, but we would not rule out a different species in the genus.  It is described on BugGuide as: “Pronotoum black at center, broadly orange at sides; head with a diamond-shaped orange frontal spot” and its range is listed as:  “sw. TX (Chinati Mts and Eagle Pass), Mexico (Chihuahua, Durango).”  Does that match your location in Texas?

Blister Beetle: Lytta cribrata

Thank you Daniel.
Yes it does match Chihuahuan desert area. I need to look up what the “Pronotoum” is, though. If is the center “thorax section” [before the black section with its wings; yet behind the red and black section with its eyes and antennae] that fits the description. It certainly matched the color markings if that is what I think the pronotoum is.
The lobed antennae seemed to me rather distinctive as does the y-shaped pincer tipped legs. Any mention of those in the description of Lytta cribrate?
Plus the wings are very textured. That is not dew on the surface.
I really appreciate your help Daniel.
Richard Todd

Blister Beetle: Lytta cribrata

Good morning Richard.  The Pronotum is defined on BugGuide as:  ” the upper surface of the prothorax, the first segment of the thorax. Shape of the pronotum is often important in identification of beetles, and many other groups.”  While Coleopterists, entomologists who specialize in Beetles, have an extensive vocabulary of terms they use to describe characteristics, we believe punctate, which is defined on BugGuide as “marked by spots, dots, points, depressions, or punctures” could be used to describe the texture of the elytra or wing covers on the Blister Beetles you observed.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Bug in pool skimmer basket
Geographic location of the bug:  Stratham, NH
Date: 04/11/2021
Time: 02:52 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found this giant in my pool skimmer basket this morning. Curious to know what it is.
How you want your letter signed:  Pool owner

Predaceous Diving Beetle

Dear Pool owner,
This is a Predaceous Diving Beetle in the family Dytiscidae, probably in the genus
Dytiscus. According to BugGuide the habitat is “permanent or temporary freshwater ponds and pools (D. marginicollis may occur in saline ponds), plus streams and rivers; usually found on or among aquatic plants.”

Predaceous Diving Beetle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Cool Beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  Paradise Mountain, Valley Center, California
Date: 04/11/2021
Time: 11:08 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I’m thinking this is a male Glow Worm Beetle that is…
Zarhipis integripennis?
How you want your letter signed:  Bomberojohn79

Firefly

Dear Bomberojohn79,
The Western Glowworm males pictured on BugGuide have orange legs.  We actually believe this is a Firefly,
Pterotus obscuripennis, based on this BugGuide image, and according to BugGuide:  “comes to lights in spring/early summer.”

Thank you so much for setting me straight.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Blue green beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  Central NC USA
Date: 03/13/2021
Time: 03:57 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Looking for a name.
How you want your letter signed:  ?

Splendid Earth Boring Dung Beetle

We believe we have correctly identified your beetle as a Splendid Earth Boring Dung Beetle, Geotrupes splendidus, thanks to images posted to BugGuide.  According to BugGuide it is “Bright green, purplish black, or sometimes light blue. Pronotum coarsely, unevenly punctate. Elytral striae with distinct punctures.”

Splendid Earth Boring Dung Beetle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Cicada???
Geographic location of the bug:  Delaware April 6
Date: 04/08/2021
Time: 10:44 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Can you tell me what this is?
How you want your letter signed:  Robin

Scarab Grub

Our Auto-response: Thank you for submitting your identification request.
Please understand that we have a very small staff that does this as a labor of love. We cannot answer all submissions (not by a long shot). But we’ll do the best we can!

Please help me.  I am trying to get this Id so I can send to local paper who wants it if it is a cicada.
Enjoy Life,
Robin Coventry

Scarab Grubs

Dear Robin,
We suspect your urgent identification request is related to the imminent appearance of the Brood X Periodical Cicadas, sometimes called 17-Year Locusts though they are not true locusts.  CicadaMania has information on Brood X which last appeared in 2004, when we were but a fledgeling website.  These are not immature Cicadas.  You did not indicate where they were located.  These are Beetle Grubs.  We suspect they may have been found in or near a rotting stump and we believe, due to their size, that they may be the Grubs of Eastern Hercules Beetles.  Here is an image from BugGuide of Eastern Hercules Beetle Grubs.  The adult male Hercules Beetle is an impressive creature, the heaviest North American Beetle.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Blue beetle?
Geographic location of the bug:  West Virginia
Date: 04/05/2021
Time: 08:09 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  What is this guy?!
How you want your letter signed:  Marion Sophia

Oil Beetle

Dear Marion,
This is a Blister Beetle in the genus
Meloe commonly called an Oil Beetle.  According to BugGuide, there are 22 North American species and we do not have the required qualifications to provide you with a species.  We do know that some species are found in the spring and others in the fall.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination