Currently viewing the category: "Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Kirstenbosch Bug
Location: Kirstenbosch National Botanic Gardens
February 26, 2017 10:17 am
I write a wildlife blog with photos I’ve taken from my travels. I want to properly identify these mating bugs so I can present correct information on their breeding habits, lifestyle, etc. This photo was taken at Kirstenbosch National Botanical Gardens in Cape Town, SA.
Thanks for your help!
Signature: Christian

Mating Small Flower Chafers

Do you have an image that does not have the flower petals obscuring the beetles?

Unfortunately, they were in the flowers for awhile. I have this above shot of them as well. Sadly, I don’t own a macro lens and wasn’t able to get extremely close to them because of lens focus constraints. My husband also brought up looking up known pollinators for this flower, so I may try that tactic as well.
Let me know if this helps!
Christian

Mating Small Flower Chafers

Dear Christian,
Thanks for sending a second view.  These are Scarab Beetles, and we suspect they are Fruit and Flower Chafers in the Subfamily Cetoniinae or Shining Leaf Chafers in the Subfamily Rutelinae.  Representing the Cetoniinae, they might be the Small fruit|flower chafer,
Leucocelis adspersa subsp. adspersa, which is pictured on iSpot in a single posting only.  There is a better image on the Flower Beetles site with the image here.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: BIG bug!
Location: Gamkaskloof (Swartberg), Western Cape
February 26, 2017 9:18 am
Hi,
What exactly is this large beetle with big pincers please?
George
Signature: No preference

Prionid

Dear George,
This is a Root Borer in the subfamily Prioninae, and we believe that based on images posted to iSpot,
Anthracocentrus capensis is a likely species identification.  A note on iSpot states:  “In case you may miss some scale in this picture, this is an enormous beetle in excess of 80mm long, and one of the very largest beetles in southern Africa. The individual here is a female; the male bears even considerably longer mandibles (“jaws”).”  There is a nice comparison image showing the male and female on Prioninae.org.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Larder beetles in pa
Location: NW PA
February 25, 2017 9:11 am
You guys should add this to the pa listing of beetles. I couldn’t find it but I located it through another page but I usually use this one. I found this guy in my kitchen.
Signature: Your friendly PA neighbor

Larder Beetle

Dear friendly PA neighbor,
On WTB? we archive Larder Beetles under the Household Pests tag as well as the Pantry Beetles subcategory.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Feather-Horned Beetle – Rhipicera femorata
Location: Mount Gambier, South Australia
February 23, 2017 1:06 am
Found this beautiful little man today while out taking photos. Its a male Rhipicera femorata. They are uncommon and little is known about them, and i thought you and your readers might enjoy some nice photos 🙂
Taken on 23/02/2017, Mount Gambier, South Australia
Signature: – Liam

Feather Horned Beetle

Dear Liam,
This is a very good morning for us.  Generally, the beginning of the year is not the busiest time for our site as winter envelops the northern hemisphere and most of our submissions are blurry images sent by desperate homemakers who find carpet beetles, stink bugs, bed bugs, cockroaches and other household intruders that they fear and loath.  Your submission is the third beautiful and wondrous posting for us today.  We really prefer posting images from people who appreciate the beauty of the lower beasts.  While Feather Horned Beetles are not new to our site, your images are especially lovely.  According to the Atlas of Living Australia:  “Adults may not feed, but fly readily in fine weather. During their short summer flight season, males greatly outnumber females; their flabellate antennae are presumably particularly sensitive to the female’s scent and help them to home in on her. The larvae are thought to be parasites of the nymphs of cicadas living in sandy soils.”  According to Featured Creature:  “The males differ from the females in that their anntenae are much larger and more pronounced. Those anntenae are unique due to the fact that they have more than 20 segments and arise from small knob-like prominences.”

Feather Horned Beetle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bugs on Quercus ilex (Spain)
Location: Salamanca (Spain)
February 20, 2017 6:14 am
I enclose three pictures of two bugs (larva and adult) found on young Quercus ilex (inside). The larva is about 25 mm and de adults about 2 mm. They were found in Salamanca (central western Spain).
They don’t look like the usual borers in the area.
Thank you very much
Signature: Luis Carlos Jovellar (Salamanca, Spain)

Round-Headed Borer

Dear Luis,
The images of the larva you submitted appear to be Round-Headed Borers, a general name for the larvae of members of the Longhorned Borer Family Cerambycidae.  See this BugGuide image for comparison.  They are unrelated to the adult insects you submitted which we will address at a later date.  Knowing the host plant is often a tremendous assistance in the identification of larval stages.  According to the opening sentence of a scholarly article we located on Springer Link:  “
Cerambyx welensii Küster is one of the greatest threats to Quercus suber L. and Quercus ilex L. in Spain.”  While that is not a definitive identification for the Round-Headed Borer you sighted, chances are good that it might be a correct identification.  iNaturalist has an image of the adult.  Your larva has a distinctive yellow coloration.  The Espiritu de Arbol blog has images of adults and larvae.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beetle
Location: Portland, Oregon
February 19, 2017 5:13 pm
I found this beetle indoors today. I think it is a Golden Buprestid Beetle. I want to know if it is a good bug or a bad bug.
Signature: Lois Biz

Golden Buprestid

Dear Lois,
We agree that this is a Golden Buprestid, but when it comes to insects, “good” and “bad” are such relative terms.  Since the native range of the Golden Buprestid includes Oregon, this is a native species for you and native species occupy a place in the food chain as well as in the complicated, interconnected web of life in an ecosystem that we feel compelled to maintain that all native species are good in the overall scheme of things.  Introduced species can throw off the balance of life in a geographic region to which they have been introduced if they have no natural enemies to help control their populations, so we often consider introduced species to be problematic in their new homes, a consideration that lead to the creation of the Invasive Exotics tag on our site many years ago.  According to the genus page on BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on wood of various conifers and deciduous trees, incl. Fagus (Beech), Populus (Cottonwood), Acer (Maple), and Quercus (Oak).”  It is our understanding that native Metallic Borer Beetles are never plentiful enough in their native surroundings to do significant damage to healthy trees, unlike the related and introduced Emerald Ash Borer that has decimated populations of Ash trees in eastern North America.  As a point of interest, Golden Buprestids have been known to emerge many years after lumber has been milled.  Seems milling the lumber slows the maturation process, but the larvae are able to survive and continue to feed on the dead wood.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination