Currently viewing the category: "Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  A beautiful green bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Arkansas
Date: 09/25/2017
Time: 11:10 PM EDT
I saw an interesting bug on my porch. Some type of beetle perhaps. Just wondering what it is.
Thank you for your time.
How you want your letter signed:  Melody

Bumelia Borer

Dear Melody,
This gorgeous beetle is a Bumelia Borer,
Plinthocoelium suaveolens.  According to BugGuide:  “Large, metallic green, bronze, or blue (highly variable). Femora red.” 

Bumelia Borer

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Jewel Scarab?
Geographic location of the bug:  Panama Canal Zone
Date: 09/24/2017
Time: 10:38 PM EDT
I found this beetle about 4 years ago while doing research in the forests in the Canal Zone of central Panama. It was dead laying along a stream bank, but I picked it up because I thought it looked cool, and have had it ever since. I’ve tried to find out what it is, but have had no luck. Looks like a jewel scarab, but the scutellum is larger than any I’ve seen. It’s an iridescent green, which turns to a red/orange when light reflects in certain ways. Any idea of what this is?
How you want your letter signed:  Andrew

Macraspis chrysis

Dear Andrew,
You are correct that this is a Scarab Beetle.  Perhaps the reason you didn’t have any luck with an identification is that you were searching for Scarab Beetles from Panama.  Nearby Costa Rica has many of the same insects as does Panama, but since there is more eco-tourism in Costa Rica, there tends to be better online databases for identifying the flora and fauna there.  Our first internet clue as to the identity of your Scarab Beetle was this Beetle Bling INBio posting on Jimmy O’Donnell’s Evolutionary Ecology site.  Though the species is not identified, there is an image from the collection of several dozens of what appears to be your beetle with this caption:  “A single specimen of a gold or silver Scarabs is impressive, but an entire drawer of them, lined up like a frozen army is incommunicably beautiful. Various descriptions were tossed around: gold and silver plated candies, gold doubloons, or ‘Beetle T-1000’.”  We then found an image of Macraspis chrysis on the Beetles (Coleoptera) and coleopterists site and clicking on the image produces this nice enlargement.  The species is also pictured on FlickR.

Macraspis chrysis

Wow! Thanks for the quick reply. I’m happy you were able to identify this particular beetle. Thank you so much for the help. This is a great resource for anyone with questions about a particular insect!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Beetle Attached Photo
Location:  Serra dos Órgãos National Park, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Date:  September 21, 2017
Hi there
Can you please advise what species is this ?
It was seen in the Serra dos Órgãos national park in Rio de Janeiro state Brazil.
I was fascinated by the way the antennae were laid across the back and was unable to find anyone that could identify it.
Your assistance would be greatly appreciated.
Many thanks
Séamus O’Malley

Double Crested Longicorn

Dear Séamus,
This is an unusual double crested Longicorn in the family Cerambycidae, and we eventually located it on Insetologia where it is identified as
Hypselomus cristatus.  Additional images can be found on Cerambycidae of the World.  According to Oncid ID:  “The combination of the following characters will help to distinguish this genus: large eyes; narrowly separated antennal tubercles, contiguous at base; bowed scape, gradually expanded to apex; and base of elytra with two longitudinal, arcuate, strongly elevated crests, each crest studded with several round, shiny tubercles.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  My New Friend
Location:  Holly Springs, MS
September 21, 2017 5:41 PM
Hi Daniel!
I was picking Magnolia tree seeds off the ground and made a new friend. LoL
Hope you’re having a great bug day!  Thank you for all you do. Your public adores your website!
Stephanie Berry
Aka previous bug queen

Bess Beetle

Dear Stephanie, AKA bug queen,
We love that you get a manicure and don your jewelry prior to doing yard work.  This awesome beetle is a Bess Beetle in the family Passalidae.  According to BugGuide:  “Unusual (for beetles) subsocial lifestyle. Adults and larvae live together in family groups in galleries excavated in rotting wood by adults. Adults care for larvae, and actively feed them prechewed food. Both adults and larvae stridulate, which is used for communication within the group.”

Bess Beetle

Thank you for getting back to me. I love you and your website. Critters of all kinds are special to me!
Have a great weekend, my fav bug man!
Steph

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Bugs on fungus on maple tree
Geographic location of the bug:  Southern Indiana
Date: 09/20/2017
Time: 01:01 PM EDT
I believe these to be some sort of blister beetles. All I have been able to find are blister beetles with 3+ colored bands. I have never seen them before, but cannot find information about them being in our area. Your help is appreciated.
How you want your letter signed:  Thanks! Sasha

Pleasing Fungus Beetle

Dear Sasha,
This is a Pleasing Fungus Beetle in the genus
Megalodacne.  Based on the BugGuide information that “Note also different form of scutellar macula, and pronotal sides near hind angles (slightly concave in heros / straight to slightly convex in fasciata)” we are leaning toward this being Megalodacne fasciata.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  I think i may have a new type of bug i found on the sidewalk and carefully took it home
Geographic location of the bug:  Slovenia, Logatec
Date: 09/21/2017
Time: 08:33 AM EDT
Is it a new type it looms like half a ladybug ( the head) and some kind of black and bage stripes
How you want your letter signed:  However you want

Colorado Potato Beetle

This is a Leaf Beetle in the family Chrysomelidae.  It looks to us like a Colorado Potato Beetle, which is native to the Rocky Mountains in North America.  This amusing BBC News article begins with “In 1950 the East German government claimed the Americans were dropping potato beetles out of planes over GDR fields in an attempt to sabotage their crops. Was it true, or an example of Cold War propaganda?”  According to BugGuide:  “before the introduction of the potato in the US, was confined to Colorado and neighboring states feeding on native Solanum species; now occurs in most potato growing areas both in NA and Europe has become a serious pest in Europe.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination