Currently viewing the category: "Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Identify this bug?
Geographic location of the bug:  Columbus, N.M.
Date: 11/08/2019
Time: 10:00 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  We are on the border of New Mexico and saw this bug about the approx  size of a quarter.
How you want your letter signed:  Gaila

Blister Beetle: Megetra species

Dear Gaila,
This is a Blister Beetle in the genus
Megetra and we identified it on BugGuide.  There are three species in the genus, and two are found in New Mexico, but they look so similar, we cannot discern a difference.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Does anyone know what kind of bug his is?
Geographic location of the bug:  Kigali,Rwanda
Date: 11/01/2019
Time: 05:18 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I came across this bug in the gym, it looked dead but it wasn’t, when I touched it, it flew away.
Does anyone know what is the name of the insect?
How you want your letter signed :  N/A

Scarab Beetle: Pachnoda aemula

Dear N/A,
This is a beautiful Scarab Beetle.  We found a matching image on terrarium.pl where it is identified as
Pachnoda aemula.  Another possibility is  Pachnoda sinuatapictured on iSpot.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Green Beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  Tomball Texas
Date: 09/27/2019
Time: 07:54 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Just curious what kind of beetle it is. They are beautiful. Thank you.
How you want your letter signed:  Brianne

Green June Beetle

Dear Brianne,
This is one of the Green June Beetles in the genus
Cotinis, but we are not certain of the species.  Texas is the western edge of the reported range of the Green June Beetle, Cotinis nitida, according to BugGuide data, and Texas is the eastern edge of the reported range of the Green Fig Beetle or Figeater, Cotinis mutabilis, according to BugGuide data.  To further complicate matters, we have learned that Tomball, Texas is just north of Houston, which opens up the possibility that this might be the South Texas Coastal Cotinis, Cotinis boylei, which is profiled on Texas Entomology, though we believe that to be the least likely of the three possible species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Yellowjacket or Cricket?
Geographic location of the bug:  New Jersey
Date: 09/22/2019
Time: 08:48 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This bug landed on me and later seemed to “fly” away like a grasshopper. It wasn’t behaving like a wasp and it’s head and body shape don’t look wasplike. What is it???
How you want your letter signed:  Libby

Locust Borer

Dear Libby,
This Locust Borer is actually a beetle that is a very effective Yellowjacket mimic.  Locust Borers are often found on Goldenrod.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this creature?
Geographic location of the bug:  Richmond, BC Canada river front
Date: 09/11/2019
Time: 06:34 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this little guy scurrying on the basement floor of our house. For a moment I thought it was a caterpillar and was going to stomp on it, but I realized he was not going to become a moth and took some pics. I’m pretty sure this is some sort of beetle but I’ve never seen one like this before! And FYI once I took these pics I let him go outside. I am of the same mind with respect to most bugs 🙂
How you want your letter signed:  Dan

Devil’s Coach Horse

Dear Dan,
This interesting Rove Beetle is commonly called a Devil’s Coach Horse.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this?
Geographic location of the bug:  Winston-Salem, NC
Date: 09/06/2019
Time: 03:11 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  These photos were taken on 07/31/19 in the parking lot of a suburban park. The body of the insect shown was about 1 inch long.
How you want your letter signed:  Amanda T.

Longicorn:  Neoclytus mucronatus

Dear Amanda,
This is a Longicorn or Longhorned Borer Beetle in the genus
Neoclytus, and it has no common name.  We believe we have correctly identified it as Neoclytus mucronatus thanks to this image on BugGuide.  It is one of the species that mimics a stinging wasp like a Paper Wasp for protection as the beetle does not sting, but potential predators are put off by the warning colors.

Longicorn: Neoclytus mucronatus

Thanks for the swift response! I’m glad you were able to ID this for me. The markings on the wing casings kept me from seeing that it was any kind of beetle. I guess mimicry works to fool amateur entomologists too.
-AT

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination