Currently viewing the category: "Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What’s in the eggplant patch?
Geographic location of the bug:  Brisbane, Australia (inner city)
Date: 02/15/2019
Time: 01:41 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi Bugman,
These bugs have been in my eggplant patch for some time now. I am still getting eggplants so they don’t seem too harmful, but no one knows what they are! They can fly, but they seem to prefer walking. I once counted 30 in the patch.
Location: Brisbane, Australia. Time: Summer. Maybe relevant this is in a fifth floor balcony garden. There are plenty of bugs in the garden overall, but these ones seem to have a monopoly on the eggplant.
How you want your letter signed:  The Curious Eggplant Grower

Mango Flower Beetles

Dear Curious Eggplant Grower,
You had us with your subject line:  What’s in the eggplant patch?
These are Scarab Beetles and we are inclined to speculate they are in the Fruit and Flower Chafer subfamily Cetoniinae.  We are continuing research; we just wanted you to know where to begin your own research.
There seems to be a considerable amount of variation in color and markings on the Mango Flower Beetle,
Protaetia fusca, pictured on the Brisbane Insect site, but though none exactly matches the warm golden-bronze color of the individuals you submitted, we nonetheless believe that species is correct.
Based on the images and the statement “Elytra of male with apical spines, female lacking spines” posted on the Hawaiian Scarab ID site, the individual on the right in your image, with the spines on the posterior ends of the elytra or wing covers, is a male.  The site also states:  “In Australia, both adults and larvae are found throughout the year. Females deposit as many as 147 eggs in humus during their 6–7 month adult lifespans. Larvae feed on organic materials within the soil rather than live plant roots and reached maturity in roughly 50 days. Natural enemies include wasps (
Scolia spp.) that attack larvae, a variety of birds, and Aspergillus fIavus (a fungus that sometimes infects adults).”
We have been getting numerous comments lately from Australia regarding the Blue Flower Wasp, an Australian Scoliid Wasp, indicating they have plentiful prey, the larvae of Scarab Beetles.

Thanks so much! I think you are on the money!
Although, I am a little fascinated they are just sticking to the eggplants, and ignoring the other delights, such as the mango tree!
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Is this a ladybug?
Geographic location of the bug:  San Antonio tx
Date: 02/05/2019
Time: 12:57 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello I’m having trouble finding this bug online.
How you want your letter signed:  Erika garza

Leaf Beetle

Dear Erika,
This is not a Lady Beetle.  It is a Leaf Beetle in the genus
Calligrapha, but we are uncertain of the species.  According to BugGuide:  “38 spp. and sspp. in 4 subgenera in our area.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  is this a wasp mimic longhorn beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  Madill, Oklahoma (central southern part of state)
Date: 02/04/2019
Time: 02:38 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  found this unusual beetle while working cows on our ranch this past weekend 2-3-2019. Was a warm (unusual 60’s degree F) winter day
How you want your letter signed:  chris w. bradshaw

Hickory Borer

Dear Chris,
This looks to us like a Hickory Borer.  Hickory Borers are active late in the winter and early in the spring.  Those appear to be oak leaves and acorns in your image.  Do you also have nut trees nearby?  According to BugGuide:  “larvae mine newly dead hickory, and sometimes other hardwoods.”  It is commonly accepted that the Hickory Borer, one of the Longhorned Borer Beetles in the family Cerambycidae, is a Yellowjacket mimic.

Thanks Daniel, and yes we have pecan grove not too far away. They were just planted 3 years ago so not very old yet. Again Thanks.
Chris

Update:  We wouldn’t rule out that this might be a Mesquite Borer, which is pictured on BugGuide, though BugGuide does not report the Mesquite Borer from Oklahoma. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Metallic Blue Beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  My. Charleston, NV
Date: 02/01/2019
Time: 09:04 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Inerested in in identifying this beautiful beetle.
How you want your letter signed:  Steve M.

Blue Bycid: Callidium species

Dear Steve,
This is a gorgeous beetle in the family Cerambycidae, the Long-Horned Borer Beetles or Bycids.  We have it narrowed down to two genera.  Our first choice is the Blackhorned Pine Borer,
Callidium antennatum, which is pictured on BugGuide, or possibly Semanotus amethystinus, a species with no common name and also pictured on BugGuide.  We are contacting Doug Yanega at UC Riverside for assistance.

Blue Bycid: Callidium species

Doug Yanega responds.
Hi. I can confirm that it’s a female Callidium, but can’t be sure of species.
Peace,
Doug Yanega
Dept. of Entomology
Entomology Research Museum Univ. of California, Riverside

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Bright Green beetle, dark blue legs and orange head.
Geographic location of the bug:  Mitcham Victoria Australia
Date: 01/30/2019
Time: 11:40 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Can you identify this beetle? I would be very great full if you can.
How you want your letter signed:  Yours truly  Andrea King

Female Golden Stag Beetle

This is a marvelous image of what we believe is a female Golden Stag Beetle, Lamprima aurata, that we identified thanks to the Museums Victoria Collections site where it is described as:  “Body oval and shiny. Colour varies; green, red, blue or purple all over body. Males have larger bodies and larger jaws (mandibles) than females. Body up to 3 cm long, usually 1.5 – 2.5 cm.”   FlickR includes a really beautiful image, and according to Encyclopedia of Life:  ” is relatively common throughout Australia, and fairly variable in coloration, so has been given many names by various authors. Females are smaller than the males, and males have the mandibles enlarged and prolonged forwards. The colour of the males is typically metallic golden green or golden yellow, while females may be blue, blue-green or also dull brown.”  Your inquiry is perfectly timed to be our Bug of the Month for February 2019.

Hi Daniel,
That is marvellous.  Just wondering if I can have my name on it instead of ‘yours truly’ as I didn’t know what was meant by ‘how would you like it signed’.  Also does it cost to register on the site?
Kind regards
Andrea King

Hi Andrea,
There is no charge to register on WTB?

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Glitter Green Beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  Miami Florida
Date: 01/23/2019
Time: 10:54 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello,  I found this beetle on a carambola(Star fruit) in my back lawn. It was almost transparent with glitters of green.
How you want your letter signed:  Tammy F

Geiger Tortoise Beetle

Dear Tammy,
This is a Tortoise Beetle, a member of the tribe Cassidini of the Leaf Beetle family.  We are confident it is the Geiger Tortoise Beetle,
Physonota calochroma floridensis, which is pictured on BugGuide, and is a subspecies confined to “Florida: from Palm Beach to Key West”.  According to BugGuide:  “live adults are brilliant lime green with a black spot in the middle of the pronotum; dead museum specimens are dull yellow to cream-colored – very different from live animals” and “feeds on the Geiger Tree (Cordia sebestena).”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination