Currently viewing the category: "Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Glow worm?
Location: Rimrock, AZ
April 25, 2017 8:27 pm
Found this on the floor of my apartment tonight. What is it?
Signature: Laura

Bioluminescent Larva

Dear Laura,
This does not look like a typical Glowworm to us.  Glowworms or Railroad Worms are the larvae of beetles in the family Phengodidae.  This doesn’t look like a Firefly Larva from the family Lampyridae either.  It does look like a Wireworm, the larva of a Click Beetle.  There are bioluminescent Glowing Click Beetles in the genus Deilelater, but we have not been able to locate an image of the larva.  BugGuide only lists North American sightings in Texas and Florida, however, BugGuide does indicate “
D. physoderus GA-FL-AZ, Mexico.”  Though that is circumstantial, our best guess right now is that this might be the larva of a Glowing Click Beetle.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Eucalyptus Leaf Beetles found in Mount Washington
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
April 25, 2017
About two weeks ago, we were walking down the street and we noticed that something was chewing the leaves of a big eucalyptus tree growing on the side of the road.  Sure enough, we found Eucalyptus Leaf Beetles,
Paropsisterna m-fuscum, including one larva.  When we returned to take some images, we could not locate the larva.  According to BugGuide:  “native to Australia, introduced into so. CA (ca. 2003).”  According to iNaturalist:  “This insect can become very prolific and is a serious pest species in the forestry industry. This particular species is a problem on Blue Gum in California, USA.  The beetles are pale, with variable brown markings on the elytra and pronotum and sometimes with bright flaring at the base of the elytra. The larvae are larviform and pale green like the leaves they eat.”

Eucalyptus Leaf Beetle

Eucalyptus Leaf Beetle

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Can you identity this beetle for me?
Location: Darlington QLD Australia
April 24, 2017 3:38 am
Hi, I found this beetle in a gorge and I was wondering if you could identify it.
Signature: Place on email

Regal Jewel Beetle

This is a Jewel Beetle in the family Buprestidae, and based on images posted to Australia:  Land of Stigmodera, we believe it is Calodema regalis or a closely related species.  There is also an image named the Regal Jewel Beetle posted to Csiro that supports that identification.

Regal Jewel Beetle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this?!
Location: New Market, Tennessee
April 23, 2017 8:02 am
Hello! I believe this to be a type of assassin bug but i’m hoping to confirm. It is the season of April, and found on the 22nd day.
Signature: Kevin Dame

False Bombardier Beetle

Dear Kevin,
This is not an Assassin Bug, nor any other true bug for that matter.  This is a False Bombardier Beetle, and according to BugGuide:  “Caution: These beetles have chemical defenses.”  In our opinion, the chemical defenses are more of an annoyance to humans than they are a threat.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Golden Yellow bug
Location: Cyprus, Kalo Chorio
April 22, 2017 7:18 am
Found this outside the offices near the flower bushes, trying to figure out what species this is, looks like some sort fuzzy little scarab but not sure what kind exactly.
Signature: Random Office worker

Jewel Beetle

Dear Random Office Worker,
We believe we have correctly identified this lovely Jewel Beetle in the family Buprestidae as
Julodis armeniaca cypria, a subspecies endemic to Cyprus, thanks to the Nature Wonders site where it states:  “Endemic subspecies of Cyprus. The nominal species J. a. armeniaca Marseul, 1864, can be found in Turkey and the Near East.”  It is also pictured on BioLib.  Though this is a new species to our site, we do have amazing images from South Africa of a relative in the same genus, the Brush Jewel Beetle.

Jewel Beetle: Julodis armeniaca cypria

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: 50 of the came out of nowhere
Location: Delaware Ohio 43015
April 19, 2017 6:40 pm
We have lived here for 17 years and have never witnessed this before. One late afternoon mid April in Central Ohio our detached garage started to buzz. There were at least 50 of these mating. What are they and are they dangerous. We have small children and pets. Very concerned. Thank you,
Signature: Thank you Ryan Boyer

Mating Hickory Borers

Dear Ryan,
Was there a pile of firewood in or near your garage?  Because of their spring appearance, we know these are Hickory Borers and not the very similar looking and closely related Locust Borers that usually appear in the fall when the goldenrod is blooming.  Neither species is dangerous, but both mimic stinging YellowJackets for protection.  While not dangerous, Hickory Borers have strong mandibles that might deliver a painful nip if carelessly handled.  Larvae of Hickory Borers are wood borers, and according to BugGuide:  “larvae mine newly dead hickory, and sometimes other hardwoods.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination