Currently viewing the category: "Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  Logan County, KY
Date: 07/10/2020
Time: 07:01 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Interesting beetle on a passionflower leaf around 9:30 am
How you want your letter signed:  Cindy Gupton

Banded Netwinged Beetle

Dear Cindy,
We are impressed that you identified this Banded Net-Winged Beetle as a Beetle because it is frequently mistaken for a moth.

 

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Weird flying bug wandering aimlessly, crawls fast
Geographic location of the bug:  Northwest Michigan
Date: 07/11/2020
Time: 05:13 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman :  Kinda a scary bug. Not sure if it’s a wood eater looking to destroy my house?  An earwig?  Does it bite or sting?  He kept circling me and landing near me and chasing me. Maybe he just had a missing antennae and couldn’t steer
How you want your letter signed:  C

Gold and Brown Rove Beetle

Dear C,
Few people would recognize this as a Beetle, because it does not resemble most beetles.  This is a Gold and Brown Rove Beetle,
Ontholestes cingulatus, which is pictured on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Eggs are laid near carrion or fungi; pupate in chambers in soil nearby”  It will not harm your home.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Identification of insect
Geographic location of the bug:  Grand Rapids, MI
Date: 07/07/2020
Time: 06:35 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I don’t know what this insect is.  I found it on a door frame in the morning on a summer day.
Thank you for any information you can provide.
How you want your letter signed:  M.J. Moriarty

Male Glowworm Beetle

Dear MJ,
This is a male Glowworm Beetle.
  According to BugGuide:  “mostly nocturnal; males come to lights.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What kind of beetle is this?
Geographic location of the bug:  Western New York
Date: 07/07/2020
Time: 10:33 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  There is a large beetle looking bug out this evening. 1.5-2 inches in length, oval body,  big round eyes and the shell is green, black/blue and brown.
How you want your letter signed:  M

Predaceous Diving Beetle

Dear M,
This is a Predaceous Diving Beetle in the family Dytiscidae, probably in the genus
Dytiscus, and possibly Dytiscus fasciventris which is pictured on BugGuide and described as:  “only the anterior and lateral margins of pronotum are bordered by a broad pale stripe (posterior margin not bordered); lateral margin of elytron bordered by broad pale stripe on basal half only remainder of dorsal surface brown, brownish-black, or green; ventral surface yellow to reddish except metacoxa yellow and metasternum brownish-black medially.” Though they are aquatic, Predaceous Diving Beetles can fly from pond to pond and they are sometimes attracted to lights.

Awesome response time haha! Thank you so much!

Our timing aligned.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Rainbow beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  Western Washington state
Date: 06/21/2020
Time: 06:16 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  What kind of bug is this ?
How you want your letter signed:  The Alvarados

Golden Buprestid

Dear Alvarados,
This beautiful beetle is a Golden Buprestid,
Buprestis aurulenta.  It is pictured on iNaturalist.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Fast on foot and flies
Geographic location of the bug:  Eastern TN, US
Date: 06/21/2020
Time: 12:33 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi!  Since moving to Eastern TN, we’ve found our new home to be teeming with all sorts of life.  Here is one that stood out and which I could not identify.  Maybe you can?
How you want your letter signed:  Keith

Red Headed Ash Borer

Dear Keith,
This is a Red Headed Ash Borer,
Neoclytus acuminatus, or a closely related species of Longhorned Borer Beetle.  All indications are that the color, markings and behavior of the Red Headed Ash Borer mimic that of a stinging wasp, which protects the harmless beetle from potential predators.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on the sapwood of ash and other hardwoods, and even occasionally on vines and shrubs. Larvae are common in downed timber with the bark left on.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination