Currently viewing the category: "Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Beetle id needed
Geographic location of the bug:  Kitchen Creek Falls Trail, Cleveland Nat’l Forest,CA
Date: 03/20/2019
Time: 01:34 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  is this another Shining Leaf Chafer: Paracotalpa puncticollis ?
How you want your letter signed:  Terri V

Little Bear Scarab, we believe

Dear Terri,
We believe you have the genus correct, but we are not certain of the species, though because of its dark coloration, we are leaning toward a different Little Bear Scarab,
Paracotalpa ursina based on this BugGuide image from San Diego.  The posting includes a comment stating:  “Paracotalpa ursina, dark form. Very common in that area on Chamise this time of year.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Bug found at Joshua Tree Nat Park
Geographic location of the bug:  Joshua Tree National Park
Date: 03/19/2019
Time: 12:19 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello, I found this little guy/gal on March 17, 2019 at Joshua Tree National Park in Southern California. Do you know what it is? Thank you, Deb
How you want your letter signed:  deb

Weevil

Dear Deb,
This is some species of Weevil, but we do not recognize it.  Can you please provide an approximate size and any other helpful information.  Was it found on a plant?  What type of plant?  Often, knowing the food preferences is a big assistance with identifications.

Weevil

Hello Daniel,
Thank you for replying.
Ah-ha! I thought it might be some sort of a weevil! J
I am sorry, I thought I sent you the photo of it with my finger in the photo so you could see its size in relationship to my finger.
Attached is the photo of it with my thumb in the photo. It is about the size of my thumb nail.
It was not found on a plant.
I found it March 17, 2019, on the roadway, under my solar panels in La Quinta, CA behind the Torre Nissan dealership (address: 2069 79125, CA-111, La Quinta, CA 92253)
I don’t know if this is relevant or not to its origin:

  • Just prior to finding it, I was out camping at Joshua Tree National Park in California from March 7, 2019 – March 16, 2019.
  • I stayed at Belle campground in the park.
  • The park was in full bloom.
  • When leaving the park on March 16, 2019, I had vehicle problems and was towed to Torre Nissan dealership (address: 2069 79125, CA-111, La Quinta, CA 92253)
  • While waiting for my truck to be repaired, I parked my travel trailer behind the Nissan dealership.
  • I put out my solar panels on the roadway so I would have electricity while I waited.
  • The next day, on March 17, 2019, my truck repairs were done and I went to pack up my solar panels and this little guy was on the ground under my panels.
  • I can’t be sure that he stowed away in my solar panels or that I carried him from Joshua Tree National Park to La Quinta, CA.
  • All I can say is that it was on the roadway, under my solar panels, in La Quinta, CA behind the Torre Nissan dealership (address: 2069 79125, CA-111, La Quinta, CA 92253)

Thank you for your help.
I posted it on my Facebook page and everyone was interested in knowing what this strange creature was.
I did a little research on the internet and I thought it might be a weevil of some sort.
Deb

Unknown Weevil

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Black and White Darling Beetle?
Geographic location of the bug:  Corona, CA
Date: 03/17/2019
Time: 08:45 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I can’t find any information on white Darkling beetles.  This beetle does the classic tail in the air when threatened pose.
How you want your letter signed:  JohnD

Acrobat Beetle with unusual markings

Dear JohnD,
The piebald markings on your Acrobat Beetle or Stink Beetle in the
Eleodes, a genus well represented on BugGuide, do not seem naturally occurring to us.  Also, the markings appear to be layered, with a whiter coloration on top of a creamier coloration.  Is it possible this Acrobat Beetle had an encounter with a paint brush?  We will continue to research this matter.

Hi Daniel,
We thought that same thing at first.  However, we were not able to carefully scrape off any of the white and cream color like we would have been able to if it were paint.  Additionally, we found him quite far from houses in a river bed/ravine location. Unfortunately for us, but fortunately for the bug, we have a standing order for our 9 year old to safely release all bugs after taking a short look at them.  We will look around near where he released it to see if we can find it again and get to the bottom of the mystery.
Thanks!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Rescued Dung Beetles
Geographic location of the bug:  Hialeah Florida
Date: 03/15/2019
Time: 12:12 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I often see dung beetles drowning in my swimming pool-not sure why they wind up in there so often. Last Dec 31 I netted four of them in a few minutes and set them on a wall to dry out and take photos before they wandered away. One was gone before I could get back with the camera. I love how their shells vary- one had a beautiful long curving horn and side spikes on the shield. I wonder if that’s a variation due to age or gender or is it just that some beetles get lucky in the shell genetic lottery?
How you want your letter signed:  Marian

Rainbow Scarabs

Dear Marian,
Your image of rescued Rainbow Scarabs, a type of Dung Beetle, is awesome, as is the rescue story.  We are tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.  Male Rainbow Scarabs have the horn, but there is some genetic lottery involved as well.  According to BugGuide:  “Pronotum of ‘major’ male has sharp posterior angles.  Major males, depicted, are easier to differentiate than minor males (w/ short horns) and females (w/ very short horns).”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Weird camo worm
Geographic location of the bug:  La Romana, Dominican Republic
Date: 03/05/2019
Time: 08:14 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this weird worm on several palm trees at a friends home. It seems to build a cocoon of dry fibers and then starts to eat the clorofila of the palm tree leaves. Several on each branch. Never seen it before and several landscaper friends either.
How you want your letter signed:  Ariel

Palmetto Tortoise Beetle Larva

Dear Ariel,
Thanks for presenting us with this challenging identification.  Our initial search did not provide us with any conclusive identification, but we strongly suspect this is a larval form and that it will mature into some species of Beetle.  Many Leaf Beetles in the family Chrysomelidae construct structures made of fecal matter to camouflage them while they are feeding.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to provide an identification. 

Palmetto Tortoise Beetle Larva

Thank you for your help Daniel! I look forward to more info from your readers.
Regards!
Ariel.

Update:  Palmetto Tortoise Beetle Larva
A special thanks to Cesar Crash who identified the Palmetto Tortoise Beetle larva, Hemisphaerota cyanea, on BugGuide where it states:  “This is the underside of the Tortoise beetle fecal nest, showing the larva protected by it’s fecal strands.”

You have been amazing!!! Thanks for the help!!!
A.-

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Bug from Maui found in wood art
Geographic location of the bug:  In Oregon now, brought Tiki from Hawaii
Date: 03/09/2019
Time: 12:43 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi, Our Tiki from Hawaii had sawdust around it for awhile, I put in a container. A couple months later these two guys showed up. Wondering what they are. Gave them some water but not sure I want to let them loose. They bore big holes in wood.
Thanks!
How you want your letter signed:  Verlan & Kristi

Kiawe Borer

Dear Verlan & Kristi,
This is a Kiawe Roung-Headed Borer,
Placosternus crinicornis, an invasive species in Hawaii.  Its larvae are wood borers that feed on Kiawe or Prosopsis, and ccording to Wikipedia, Kiawe or Prosopis limensis is a species of mesquite native to South America.  According to BugGuide:  “This beetle’s host plant, Kiawe (Prosopis pallida), is a tropical mesquite native to Peru, Ecuador and Colombia that was introduced to Hawai’i by a single seed planted in a courtyard in Honolulu in 1826. Kiawe spread to all islands and became a source of nectar for honey production, the abundant seed pods produced became fodder for a growing cattle industry, and the wood is prized for smoking meats and barbecue. The first Kiawe Round-headed Borer was collected in 1904. The beetles are attracted to felled trees and cut wood.”  Beetles with wood boring larvae frequently emerge from milled lumber many years after the tree that contained the larva was felled.

Kiawe Borers

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination