Currently viewing the category: "Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this beetle?
Geographic location of the bug:  44°46’17.7″N 27°03’02.6″E
Date: 12/08/2018
Time: 04:19 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear Bugman,
I found this insect, but it seems unidentifyable. Can you help me to identify it, please?
How you want your letter signed:  RS

Longicorn: Dorcadion (Cribridorcadion) decipiens

Dear RS,
Your global coordinates indicate this sighting was made in Romania.  This is a Longicorn in the family Cerambycidae, and we quickly identified it as
Dorcadion (Cribridorcadion) decipiens thanks to Cerambycidae where it indicates the distribution is “Hungary, Romania, Serbia, Monte Negro, Moldova.” 

Dear Daniel,
Thanks a lot for the answer and for Dorcadion (Cribridorcadion) decipiensc identification, which were a big help for me.
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  A bronze lucanid species
Geographic location of the bug:  Seoul, Korea
Date: 11/25/2018
Time: 03:26 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this little bugger last month. Our security guard attempted to kill it, but I saved it just in time. I think it’s a Prismognathus dauricus because I saw a picture of that in my insect encyclopedia. Here is my picture with my Nippondorcus rubrofemoratus and another pic only showing himself. I heard that they only live for 1~2 months so I decided to keep it.
How you want your letter signed:  William Hong

Stag Beetle

Dear William,
Thanks for sending in your images of two species of Stag Beetles from Korea.  We located an image of
Prismognathus dauricus on Insect Collectors Shop and it does look similar as does the image on Projects Biodiversity.  Also, many thanks for your comments on images in our archives that we identified as probably being Scarab Beetle grubs that you believe are Stag Beetle grubs.

Two species of Stag Beetles

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Enormous May Beetle in Winter?
Geographic location of the bug:  Arnold, CA (Sierra Nevadas)
Date: 11/28/2018
Time: 09:52 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi there,
Two of these huge beetles were banging on my glass door before dawn today at my house in the sierra forest. They were attracted to the lights inside and my porch light,
They were hitting the glass so loudly I thought someone was knocking. And of course as soon as I opened the door to take a look, they invited themselves in. They look like May beetles but were huge, at least an inch and a half long, with fine hair all over. They were pretty noisy, slow fliers, banging into everything. I did some poking around the internet and the closest bug I could find was the European common cockchafer.
They seem like an odd bug to see in winter in the mountains (4,000ft)-temperatures here have been dipping to the 30s at night for some time. We’ve also had drenching rain over the past week. The color was much more rust/red than in the picture.
What are these giant mystery bugs? Thank you!
How you want your letter signed:  Sarah J

Hi again!
I now believe these are rain beetles.I happened to see the word “rain” on your beetle list, clicked, and there they are. Just letting you know since it seems folks seem to be looking for these. We’re getting a lot of rain here!
Thanks for this great web resource!

Rain Beetle

Dear Sarah,
We agree with your assessment that this is a Rain Beetle.  Only male Rain Beetles have wings, and they often fly during pouring rains.  There are many creatures that appear after a rain, but Rain Beetles are rather unique in that they are often only found during a rain.  Male Rain Beetles are able to locate underground females that are flightless.  Perhaps Gene St. Denis, who sends us images of Rain Beetles he collects, will have some idea of the species based on your location as populations of Rain Beetles are often quite isolated.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Black striped beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  North San Diego County, CA
Date: 11/05/2018
Time: 03:51 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This guy was sitting on a stucco wall, then moved to the pavement. Any idea what he/she is?  He/she was about an inch long.
How you want your letter signed:  Sarah L

Diaprepes Root Weevil

Dear Sarah,
Thanks for resending your images.  We are currently undergoing some technical difficulties.  This is a Diaprepes Root Weevil and according to BugGuide:  “Native to the Caribbean, adventive and established in so. US: so. & central FL (1964), so. TX (Cameron & Hidalgo Cos 2000, Corpus Christi 2005, Houston 2009;), so. CA (2005), LA (2008); further north in greenhouses.”  BugGuide also notes:  “highly polyphagous; larvae feed on roots, adults on foliage of citrus trees (esp. oranges in TX) and almost 300 other plant species” and “Major pest of citrus crops.”

Thanks so much, Daniel! I’d never seen anything looking like that before here in Southern California. (And I’m a native!) I guess I’ll kill any others I find since I do have citrus trees.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  what’s this bug?!
Geographic location of the bug:  Turrialba, Cartago, Costa Rica
Date: 11/09/2018
Time: 10:56 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  We found this bug in the heliconia on our farm above Turrialba. It was early in the morning in June. The children would love to learn what it is and why it has hooks on its feet.
How you want your letter signed:  Holden

Weevil

Dear Holden,
This is a beetle known as a Weevil.  Based on Nature Closeups, it seems to be
Cholus costaricensis, and searching that name led us to iNaturalist.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Big found in kitchen cabinets
Geographic location of the bug:  New York
Date: 11/10/2018
Time: 06:30 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello,
For the last couple of weeks I have had what I thought was an ant problem in my kitchen cabinets but now I am questions the type of insect
How you want your letter signed:  Ellie

Sawtooth Grain Beetle

Dear Ellie,
This is a Sawtooth Grain Beetle, one of the many species of beetles that infest stored foods.  According to BugGuide:  “serious pest of stored grain; presence in household products is incidental and causes little concern.” 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination