Currently viewing the category: "Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Black flying bug in large window
Geographic location of the bug:  UK
Date: 04/18/2018
Time: 01:56 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  For the first time I’ve been seeing these beetles (?) in a large window in our house. Half a dozen will be seen over the course of a day. The seem to crawl on it around the window, in our sitting room only. No food is present, no flour in the house.
The are approx 5mm long. The can fly but are slow to do so.
Have seen a few for the last couple of months, but now we are in Springtime the appear more frequently.
Any help would be greatly appreciated.
How you want your letter signed:  DS

Deathwatch Beetle

Dear DS,
This looks to us like a Deathwatch Beetle in the genus
Ptilinus, and according to BugGuide:  “Larvae are wood-borers [our spp. in hardwood.”  UK sightings are documented on UK Beetle Recording and according to the Website of the Watford Coleoptera Group:  “A wood borer, colonies of which are usually found in dry exposed Faguswood but a wide variety of hosts have been recorded including Sambucus, Fraxinus, Acer, Quercus, Ulnus etc as well as plywood and ornamental timber ¹. Both standing and felled timber are attacked.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Is this a beetle ?
Geographic location of the bug:  France
Date: 04/20/2018
Time: 06:22 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I would really like to find out what kind of bug this is I’m reallh curious, I found it late at night in my garden, thank you for any help.
How you want your letter signed:  Thomas Young

Cockchafer

Dear Thomas,
This Scarab Beetle,
Melolontha melolontha, is commonly called a Cockchafer or Billy Witch in England.  According to Cabi, the International common names include:  “French: hanneton commun; man; turc.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Some kind of Cassida?
Geographic location of the bug:  Ranomafana, Madagascar
Date: 04/19/2018
Time: 03:28 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this beetle while taking  photographing some frogs very close to a waterfall.
Since we were very close to both a waterfall and rainforest it was a very moist terrain. It was sitting on a smaller bamboo-like plant. The visit was in the begining of the cooler season there.
How you want your letter signed:  Janne

Tortoise Beetle

Dear Janne,
This is indeed a Tortoise Beetle in the tribe Cassidini, but we cannot say for certain that it is a member of the genus
Cassida and we have not been able to locate any matching images that would help identify the species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Feather horned beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  Gondiwindi Qld
Date: 04/19/2018
Time: 06:44 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Not sure if you’re still interested in these submissions. I found this one on the clothesline also! They must pick up better signal on the old hillshoists.
How you want your letter signed:  Caleb

Feather Horned Beetle

Dear Caleb,
Your images of this Feather Horned Beetle,
Rhipicera femoralis, are positively gorgeous, and we always enjoy posting beautiful images.  According to biologist Dr. Carin Bondar on Facebook:  “Aren’t those antennae just amazing?  The large surface provides more space for chemoreceptors which are necessary to smell pheromones and find a partner.”

Feather Horned Beetle

Feather Horned Beetle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Large Beetle Perched in Papaya Tree
Geographic location of the bug:  St Croix, US Virgin Islands
Date: 04/20/2018
Time: 11:07 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Good Day,
Hurricanes Irma and Maria randomly seeded our debris-laden yard with a few dozen Papaya volunteers last September (along with tomatoes, peppers, pumpkin and more!). Jan-March we’ve received little to no rains, and so with recent April sprinklings, these parched trees have finally begun setting flower buds. Today while searching for open buds, this intricate beauty greeted me. After admiring his morphology for a timeless hour (or more), I wondered if I could figure out his name. “Large beetle” in Google’s image search did not help, but it did point me to your site 😃. Using inches, from “head to toe”, the main body measures 2.5″, with width of “shoulder blades” (widest part) being 3/4″ and width of rounded base being 1/2″. The antenna measures just shy of 3″. I opted not to disturb him, so, I don’t know what the underbelly looks like. What a delightful find. Thank you for providing this ID service and forum 🐞☀️🌻
How you want your letter signed:  Lee

Mango Stem Borer

Dear Lee,
This impressive beetle is not native to the Caribbean.  This is an introduced Mango Stem Borer,
Batocera rufomaculata, a species native to Asia.  Its larvae bore in the stems of mango, fig and papaya among other trees.  According to Carnivora:  “A serious pest of edible fig, mango, guava, jackfruit, pomegranate, apple, rubber, and walnut. In India recorded for more than 30 different host plants.  The female cuts the tree bark and lays eggs singly into these cuts, laying a total of up to 200 eggs. Egg is a brownish-white cylinder, 6.2 mm, with narrowly rounded ends. On hatching the larvae start to tunnel into the sapwood of the trunk or branches. Larval development takes about 2 years. As a very large species, the larval tunnel measuring 2 or 3 centimeters in width that is correspondingly large and very damaging to the tree. The larvae tunnel through the sapwood and because of their size, they make large tunnel which interfere with sap flow and affect foliage and fruit production. Attack by Batocera rufomaculata often leads to the death of the tree. Tree death has been recorded in the Virgin Islands, Israel, Mauritius, India and Malaysia. Economic loss can follow when the tree attacked bears fruits or yields another product.”

Mango Stem Borer

Whoa…. so potentially (most likely) this is a female boring eggs into the stem right now. Hmmm… I shall relocate her momentarily, as I believe she chose a host with female flower buds that eventually will fruit. Was kinda hoping the bug was a pollinator vs parasite. Incidentally, this cluster of papaya are growing under what used to be a massive Mango canopy, felled by recent hurricanes. The past 4-5 years, it rarely produced mangos, and if so, on a only few branches (15% at best). Whereas 5-6 years ago, it was fruiting heavily. Mr Bugman, I sincerely appreciate your ID expertise. Simultaneously, you solved our long curiosity as to why mangos systematically stopped appearing on our once-massive tree  Thank you, Lee

Hi again Lee,
In our opinion, the pictured tree upon which you found this Mango Stem Borer is too young to be able to support a growing larva.  There is some evidence that adult beetles feed on leaves, based on this image we located on Dreamstime.

That’s a cool foraging pic. Thank you for the addition info and links. What an enjoyable, interactive, backyard entomology trip

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  some beetle??
Geographic location of the bug:  Bay Area, California
Date: 04/17/2018
Time: 02:15 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this bug on my peas and oats! Sorry for the bad picture. Is it a harmful insect that I should work to control? If so, how do I do so? Thank you!!
How you want your letter signed:  Jayde

Soldier Beetle

Dear Jayde,
This is a Soldier Beetle in the family Cantharidae, and according to iNaturalist, there are many species in California.  Your individual might be 
Podabrus pruinosus comes based on this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide: “Adults eat nectar, pollen, other insects; larvae are fluid-feeding predators, feed on insect eggs and larvae” which means they are a beneficial family.  

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination