Currently viewing the category: "Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  The Bumpy Beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  Surprise, Arizona
Date: 07/17/2019
Time: 01:18 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I saw this guy walking across a sheet I use to protect plants from the Arizona sun. I have never seen one like it in our yard (and we have a variety of insects).
How you want your letter signed:  Alison

Desert Ironclad Beetle

Dear Alison,
We believe we have correctly identified this Darkling Beetle in the family Tenebrionidae as a Desert Ironclad Beetle,
Asbolus verrucosus, thanks to this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide:  “When startled, the beetle will fall over and feign death with legs up in the air, and become extremely rigid. After a while will begin moving and right itself.  Increasingly popular in pet trade.”  The species is also pictured on Arizona Beetles Bugs Birds and more.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Beetle eating my grape leaves
Geographic location of the bug:  SC Kentucky
Date: 07/15/2019
Time: 05:32 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  These beetles showed up almost over night and are eating all the leaves of what I think are grapes.
How you want your letter signed:  Brad Beach

Japanese Beetles feeding on grape leaves

Dear Brad,
Because they will eat the blossoms and leaves of so many prized garden plants including roses, blackberries and peaches as well as your grape vines, Japanese Beetles are among the most reviled, introduced species that affect home gardeners.  According to Featured Creatures:  “
More than 300 species of plants are known to be host to Japanese beetle.”  Your array of images makes for a perfect Japanese Beetle posting, including the image of the mating pair and the documentation of the damage to leaves, which Pearl calls “lace doilies.”

Mating Japanese Beetles

“Lace Doilies”:  Grape leaves eaten by Japanese Beetles

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unknown beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  Lostwood national wildlife refuge North west North Dakota
Date: 07/13/2019
Time: 05:23 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman :  Unable to find this beetle in any North Dakota books.
How you want your letter signed:  Thank you

Nuttail’s Blister Beetle

This is a Blister Beetle in the family Meloidae, and based on this BugGuide image, it appears to be Nuttail’s Blister Beetle.  According to BugGuide:  “Adults feed on legumes, other forbs.”

Nuttail’s Blister Beetle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  Michigan
Date: 07/11/2019
Time: 05:45 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Was wondering what kind of beetle this is? Have Japanese beetles also.
How you want your letter signed:  Kristine Degrace

Oriental Beetle

Dear Kristine,
In addition to Japanese Beetles, you also have Oriental Beetles,
Exomala orientalis, which is pictured on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “native to E. Asia, adventive in NA (*NS-GA to ON-WI-*MO), and spreading.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  Wolverhampton England
Date: 07/11/2019
Time: 08:34 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman :  Saw this today in my garden, about 1 1/2 inches long, poor flyer.Thick short anennae, large plate at rear of head.
How you want your letter signed:  S.J.Harris

Sexton Beetle

Dear S.J. Harris,
This is a Sexton Beetle or Burying Beetle in the genus
Nicrophorus, possibly Nicrophorus interruptus which is pictured on UK Beetles where it states:  “Nicrophorus species are unusual among beetles as they display biparental care of the larvae. They feed and breed on carrion and some species will breed communally on carrion too large to bury. Most species breed at small carcases of rodents and birds. Usually being attracted by the smell, a carcass will attract many individuals and the beetles will fight; males with males and females likewise, for the right to bury and breed on the food source. If a single male arrives at carrion it will wait for a partner to arrive; they attract females by releasing a pheromone from the tip of the abdomen. Females can bury a carcass and raise larvae alone from sperm stored from previous matings. The pair digs a depression beneath the carcass by pushing soil forward with their heads, if the soil is too hard they will move the carcass a short distance to more suitable substrate. Before burying the carcass they remove the fur or feathers and smear it with bactericide and fungicide to slow the decay and make it less attractive to other beetles and flies etc. Before burial the carcass is rolled into a ball. The removed fur etc. is used to line and reinforce the burial chamber, and the complete process of burial may take eight hours. Eggs are laid in the soil and the newly hatched larvae move onto the carcass. Adults feed on the carrion and regurgitate liquid food in response to begging behaviour from the larvae, this is thought to speed larval development and also to help preserve the food. If there are too many larvae the adults will selectively cull them at an early age. Adults protect and provision the larvae throughout their lives, eliminating competition from dipteral larvae etc. Full grown larvae move into the soil to pupate.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Identifying bug on tomato leaf
Geographic location of the bug:  Manassas, Va 20112
Date: 07/10/2019
Time: 12:44 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found several of these bugs eating tiny holes in the leaves of my tomato plants! I’ve never seen them before. Usually we have hornworms, but never these! They seem to use that brown stuff as cover to hide when threatened. They raise it up and cover themselves with it. Google was NO help.
How you want your letter signed:  Christina

Tortoise Beetle Larva

Dear Christina,
This is the larva of a Tortoise Beetle and it is carrying its own feces which it uses as camouflage.  We believe it might be a Clavate Tortoise Beetle larva, which is pictured on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide, this species feeds on the leaves of:  “ground-cherries (
Physalis), Jimsonweed (Datura stramonium), and Solanum spp. (Solanaceae)” and this is the plant family that includes tomatoes.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination