Currently viewing the category: "Wool Carder Bees"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination
Subject:  Large bee hunting wasp
Geographic location of the bug:  Portland,  Oregon
Date: 08/10/2018
Time: 05:20 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  For several years we’ve had a type of “hovering” yellow jacket type wasp that hunts and kills bees. Usually rip the wings off, rarely takes the bee, just leaves it to die. This year, huge fuzzy ones, sort of golden brown colored fur, have shown up. Yesterday alone I found a dozen injured bees. It also goes after bumblebees. Today I managed to kill one. It’s over 2cm long and has a 3 barbed tail. I cannot find anything comparable. Some kind of hybrid? Thoughts? Second photo is the monster next to one of the regular sized non fuzzy bee hunters.
How you want your letter signed:  Bee lover

Male European Wool Carder Bee: guilty of Apicide

Date: 08/11/2018
Time: 05:07 PM EDT
Dear bugman,
I have made a positive ID of the bee killer. They are, in fact, European wool carder bees, considered an invasive species here in Oregon. I feel 100% justified in my “carnage” if it spares some of the many native pollinators (I actually had Western bumblebees this year!) I have here on my little plot, and I hope the big one was a queen. Last year these guys took down a yellow faced bumblebee queen. No need to answer my id question. Thank you.

“Second photo is the monster next to one of the regular sized non fuzzy bee hunters.”

Dear Bee Lover,
Thanks so much for getting back to us with what you learned because you provided some very interesting information for our readers that we did not know, but we would also like some clarification.  According to BugGuide regarding the introduced European Wool Carder Bees (and if what you observed is accurate, we agree that this is NOT Unnecessary Carnage):  “Males defend their territory very aggressively not only against other males but also against other flower visitors” but we did not realize that included apicide.  In the case of this species, the size difference between the males and the females is the opposite of what we have come to expect from most Hymenopterans where the female is the larger sex because BugGuide indicates:  “Female: 11–13 mm. Male: 14–17 mm”  You wrote:  “Second photo is the monster next to one of the regular sized non fuzzy bee hunters.”  You included two images of the yellow and black male Wool Carder Bee which is the protagonist in your letter, and the second image contains that individual as well as a much larger Hymenopteran, which does not agree with what you wrote.  Additionally, both look fuzzy and you wrote about a different predator that “regular sized non fuzzy bee hunters.”  What you wrote does not seem to agree with your images.  Please clarify because it seems the “‘hovering’ yellow jacket type wasp that hunts and kills bees” is actually the male European Wool Carder Bee and the “monster” is still not identified.  See our posting and please comment on the posting for clarification.
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Large Wasp
Geographic location of the bug:  South of Spain
Date: 08/04/2018
Time: 05:57 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi Bugman,
Saved this wasp looking insect from the pool but it’s much larger than a regular wasp. Any ideas as to what it may be?
Many thanks
How you want your letter signed:  Voni

European Wool Carder Bee

Dear Voni,
This is an exciting posting for us because this is a European Wool Carder Bee,
Anthidium manicatum, and all of the representatives of the species on our site are from North America because according to BugGuide: “Introduced from Europe before 1963; spreading throughout NE. & W. NA.”  BugGuide also states:  “Females collect ‘wool’ from downy plants such as Lamb’s Ears to line their nest cavities” and “Robust, black and yellow. Males significantly larger than females.”   Discover Life has some great images and we also found a posting from Spain on FlickR.  We are tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award because of your pool rescue.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  A stunning Syrphid for your enjoyment
Geographic location of the bug:  Silverdale, WA
Date: 07/14/2018
Time: 04:48 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  No real question, just a lovely image I snapped of a Syrphidn or Flower fly/hover fly (your guess is as good as mine on a proper species ID).
Enjoy, and keep up the awesome work!
How you want your letter signed:  Bug aficionado

Wool Carder Bee

Dear Bug aficionado,
Most Flies in the order Diptera have a single pair of wings, though some species are wingless.  At any rate, no Flies have two pairs of wings, which is the physical characteristic shared by other winged insects.  This is NOT a Syrphid Fly.  It is a Wool Carder Bee in the genus Anthidium.  According to BugGuide:  “Females collect down from pubescent plants and use it to line nest.”  We cannot provide a definitive species name to your individual.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Another query for you
Geographic location of the bug:  Tarn region, South West France
Date: 10/18/2017
Time: 11:25 AM EDT
Hi bugman Daniel,
Thanks for your speedy reply and for answering my question. Great service! I think your website is fantastic, with so much info there – you must be really fascinated by all these bugs.
I have another query for you. Another piece of wood, this time poplar with about 1cm or just under half inch holes. The larvae have gone but left behind stuff like cotton wool with a hard case inside – now empty. I guess it’s another beetle, but bigger this time. Any ideas?
Best regards,
Phil Anfield

European Wool Carder Bee Nest, we believe

Hi again Phil,
We believe this is the nest of a European Wool Carder Bee, a species represented on BugGuide because it has been introduced to North America.  According to BugGuide:  “Females collect ‘wool’ from downy plants such as Lamb’s Ears to line their nest cavities.”  Here is a FlickR image and a BugGuide image of the nest.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: I can’t tell if it’s a bee?
Location: Seattle Region, Washington
August 1, 2017 5:00 pm
I found this bug already beheaded lying on my bathroom floor.
My first thought was that it was a bee, but the stripe pattern made me question it? I’ve never seen a bee before that only had yellow on its sides
Ive tried a lot of different google searches but I can’t seem to find what this is.
I don’t know about bug identification. But it’s head definitely doesn’t look like on of a fly to me? but it’s body doesn’t seem like the shape of a wasp? So I assume it must be a type of bee?
Im sorry that I don’t have any photos from different angles.
Signature: Sorry to bother you, but thank you so much for your help x

Body of a European Wool Carder Bee

This looks to us like the body of a European Wool Carder Bee.  Here is a BugGuide image for reference.  According to BugGuide:  “Introduced from Europe before 1963; spreading throughout NE. & W. NA.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Sweat Bee/Hover Fly
Location: Linn Co., Oregon
October 18, 2016 11:06 pm
These photos were taken near the end of July on Browder Ridge, Oregon. I would appreciate an
identification.
Signature: D. Gudehus

Bee

Probably Wool Bee

Dear D. Gudehus,
We do not recognize this pretty and distinctive Bee.  We are posting it as unidentified and perhaps we will be able to research its identity when we return to the office.  We are leaving for the airport in two hours.  Perhaps one of our readers will write in with an identification.  It does not appear to be on Common Bee Pollinators of Oregon Crops.

Bee

Probably Wool Carder Bee

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination