Currently viewing the category: "Solitary Bees"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Wool Carder Bee
Location: Royal Oak, Michigan
September 2, 2013 6:27 pm
Dear Bugman,
Once again, your site has served as a valuable resource in my ’backyard bugging’. Today I came across what appears to be a wool carder bee, as submitted by previous guests here. I did observe some very aggressive behavior by this fellow as he pounced on the contentedly grazing bees on my giant hyssop. BugGuide says ”they visit garden flowers and weeds preferring blue flowers that have long throats”, so this plant species fits right in. I say it is a ”he” as a previous poster had pointed out that there are three rasps at the end of the abdomen, however I found here (http://www.bwars.com/index.php?q=content/beginners-bees-and-wasps-anthidium-manicatum) that there are actually 5 rasps, the other two higher up the abdomen on either side which can be seen in photo #2 if you look very closely. Thanks again for providing such a fantastic site – it has really helped me get a jumping off point for doing more investigating on my own.
Signature: DaleShannon

Wool Carder Bee

Wool Carder Bee

Hi Dale,
Thanks for sending in your photos of a male Wool Carder Bee and also for providing us with information from your research.  This University of California Newsroom article also has some interesting information.

Male Wool Carder Bee showing abdominal spikes

Male Wool Carder Bee showing abdominal spikes

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown bee/flry
Location: Near Prescott, Ontario on the St. Lawrence River
July 7, 2013 1:25 pm
On July 1st I noticed a insect flying around my flowers that I’ve never seen before. It looked like a honey bee but it had a wider abdomen and rather than stripes, it had yellow ”blocks” down each side of the abdomen. It was about the size of a bumblebee. It was hanging around the salvia plant but it didn’t act like a regular bee. It kept landing on leaves and just sitting there or it would land on a flower, briefly walk a few steps and then take off again. It didn’t seem to be collecting nectar like bees do. With so many invasive insects around, I was concerned. This salvia plant is next to my mulberry tree. So I grabbed my camera and took several pictures. Sometimes it would sit like this with it’s wings open but other times it would sit with it’s wings closed over it’s back just like a bee.
Signature: Joan

European Wool Carder Bee

European Wool Carder Bee

Hi Joan,
This is a non-native European Wool Carder Bee, Anthidium manicatum, and the jury is still out on if this is considered an invasive species or merely one that is not native, but does not significantly, negatively impact our New World ecosystems.  We will do additional research.  Meanwhile, BugGuide has some information.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: BEE IDENTIFICATION
Location: Stanwood WA USA
April 12, 2013 11:12 am
Hello Bugman! I am an adiv gardener in Stanwood WA, USA about 50 miles north of Seattle. I love flowers but I have really become passionate about photographing critters that grace my garden, especially Bees. I was hoping if I include some photos, you could tell me what they are. Photo 1 has extremely long antennae and I have not seen this critrer since i took the picture, two years ago.
Photo #2 is a an almost triangle shaped bee that I call the Guard bee. This bee seems territorial and chases other bees away. Agressive even.
Phto# 3 is a larger bee that I named mickey mouse due to their large eyes and funny shaped wings. I have so many more! Let me know if you would like to see them! ~ Tracy
Signature: Tracy Sellers

Longhorned Bee

Longhorned Bee

Dear Tracy,
Your first photo of the bee with the long antennae is a Longhorned Bee in the tribe Eucerini which you can view on BugGuide.  We have several photos in our archive of male Longhorned Bees roosting communally in a formation commonly called a Bachelor Party.  Your third photo might be a Leaf Cutter Bee. 

Bee

Bee

We will continue to research that.  Your second photo, the one you called a Guard Bee, however is not a bee.  It is a Drone Fly, a nonstinging fly in the family Syrphidae.

Drone Fly

Drone Fly

Daniel, Thank you for the identifications. The Drone Fly was a surprise , but now that I think about it, it’s behavior does more closely resemble a fly.  I am excited to be able to put a name to  the Critters that grace my garden!
~* BEE Happy
Tracy

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: sleeping bees
Location: Pinellas County Florida (Tampa Bay)
August 31, 2012 5:36 pm
Up to 20 bees sleeping on bare stems of St. Johns Wort. Might be combination of digger and long horned bees. Any help with identification is appreciated.
Signature: Ellen

Longhorned Bees

Hi Ellen,
You have been observing a Bachelor Party of male Longhorned Bees in the tribe Eucerini.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Diadasia enavata perhaps?
Location: Northern CO mountains/foothills, ~8100 feet
August 1, 2012 10:57 am
That’s my best guess. Can’t find much on size or range, but this guy seems a bit big (about honeybee size) for that species. Also, don’t know if he’s supposed to be here.
Signature: Thanks! Matt B

What’s That Bee?

Hi Matt,
Based on images posted to BugGuide, this could well be
Diadasia enavata, but we cannot be certain.  We will post your letter and photos and perhaps someone with more knowledge of Solitary Bees will be able to assist in a species identification or confirmation.  Your photos are quite nice.

Which Bee is it???

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

What am I seeing?
Location: Cornville, AZ
May 14, 2012
Hi Daniel –
Another pic attached for you, strange one.
What am I seeing here?
We have 10 Italian Cypress appx. 25 ft. tall here that we found the
Sawfly Larva on.  Did not want to take a chance on losing them so I
sprayed them all with Spinosad to kill the larva very early this morning.
Went back a few hours later to see if any of the larva were dead, collected
a few twigs in a plastic pail.  Some larva were dead, some still alive.  Shot
some pics and ran across the attached image.
Is this a newly hatched Sawfly of some other type of insect?
Thanks –
Lou Nigro

Sawfly Larva and what might be a Chalcid Wasp

Hi Lou,
We are creating a brand new posting for this image and linking to your original submission.  The other insect looks like a parasitic Hymenopteran, possibly a Chalcid Wasp.  There are some similar looking Chalcids, but they have larger hind legs.  Perhaps it is just the camera angle.  The Chalcid is a Parasitic Hymenoptera.  The female lays eggs within a host, usually the larva of a moth, fly or beetle.  It stands to reason that they might also parasitize Sawfly Larvae.  Most parasitic Hymenopterans are host specific.  It is possible that this Sawfly that is underrepresented on the world wide web has a species specific parasite that preys upon it.  We are going to tag this posting as Food Chain even though much of our response is speculation. 

Eric Eaton identifies the Mining Bee
The “wasp” is a bee in the genus Perdita.  How it got there I have no idea.
Eric

Hi Daniel –
Looks like you are right on, took a few more shots from different angles.
Could be a species specific one as the coloring is a bit different.
Depth of field this close is limited, wish the pic was sharper, will shoot a
few more later.
See attached –
Canon 7D, Tamron 180mm Macro Lens, ISO 100, 1/250 sec, f18 using a Canon flash on
ETTL, manual exposure, handheld.
I’m glad to see that there are wasps in the area, even though I killed some of them,
that are helping me out.  Further spraying will be kept to a minimum.
Wasp measured appx. 2mm in length.
Thanks –
Lou

Hi again Lou,
Since we were wrong about the Wasp and it actually being a Bee, we suspect it was collateral damage from your insecticide.  We are not sure why it was found on the Sawfly.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination