Currently viewing the category: "Solitary Bees"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: I can’t tell if it’s a bee?
Location: Seattle Region, Washington
August 1, 2017 5:00 pm
I found this bug already beheaded lying on my bathroom floor.
My first thought was that it was a bee, but the stripe pattern made me question it? I’ve never seen a bee before that only had yellow on its sides
Ive tried a lot of different google searches but I can’t seem to find what this is.
I don’t know about bug identification. But it’s head definitely doesn’t look like on of a fly to me? but it’s body doesn’t seem like the shape of a wasp? So I assume it must be a type of bee?
Im sorry that I don’t have any photos from different angles.
Signature: Sorry to bother you, but thank you so much for your help x

Body of a European Wool Carder Bee

This looks to us like the body of a European Wool Carder Bee.  Here is a BugGuide image for reference.  According to BugGuide:  “Introduced from Europe before 1963; spreading throughout NE. & W. NA.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Anthophora bee?
Location: Saudi Arabia-Madinah
February 8, 2017 9:13 pm
Hi.
I’m realy curious to know what this bee is.
It’s a bit larger than honey bees and stubbier.
Found feb.8. 2017
4.30 p.m
Thank you.
Signature: M.A

Solitary Bee

Dear M.A,
Based on images posted to FlickR Bees of Israel, we believe your identification may be correct.  Images of North American species on BugGuide also look quite similar.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unusual bees in Southern California
Location: 90066
June 22, 2016 5:48 pm
I’ve been seeing these bees in my garden occasionally, and I haven’t been able to identify them. It’s about the size of a honey bee, but fuzzier and grayer. They seem to like yellow flowers best, especially cosmos. Do you know what they are? Where can I find more information about them?
PS: Great web site. This is an incredibly helpful resource.
Signature: Sunny in Mar Vista

Solitary Bee

Possibly Furry Leafcutter Bee

Dear Sunny,
According to BugGuide, there are 3500 species of Bees in North America.  We are guessing your white bee might be a Furry Leafcutter Bee,
Megachile perihirta, based on this BugGuide image, and according to BugGuide‘s data, there have been California sightings from May through October.  We will attempt to identify your second Solitary Bee, though we may just contact Eric Eaton to get his input as we anticipate difficulty securing an accurate identification if left to our own devices.

Solitary Bee

Solitary Bee

Thanks for the information. I didn’t realize these were 2 different species.

Solitary Bee

Solitary Bee

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Cave bee?
Location: Chinhoyi caves 17°21′0″S 30°07′30″E
February 10, 2016 11:03 am
This pretty blue bee? was in the Chinhoyi caves near Chinhoyi in Zimbabwe. It was in the large open access tunnel between the entrance and The Sleeping Pool so it might just have wandered in from the pool.
It was about 2 cm long and made a continuous buzzing sound like a bee. There was only the one bee and it was flying around as if it was exploring the walls. It didn’t seem to want to leave the cave but was just exploring the walls.
My nephew took the photos but he is happy for me to send them to you as he also wants to know.
The first photo is just the bee. The second includes a dead spider which might help for scale and also shows the side view although it is a little blurred. The third photo is just to show the tunnel where we saw it.
Signature: Upapa Epops

Solitary Bee

Solitary Bee

Dear Upapa,
Though we cannot identify your solitary blue Bee at this time, we are posting your lovely images and we hope to get some input from our readership.

Solitary Bee

Solitary Bee

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: bees
Location: Saudi Arabia- Madinah
April 21, 2015 8:27 am
Hi!
I’ve found a strange bee, it’s smaller than Common bees.
Signature: M.A

Solitary Bee

Solitary Bee

Dear M.A,
This is some species of Solitary Bee, and we will continue to search in the hope of providing something more specific.  We didn’t see anything that looked like a good match for the distinctive abdominal markings on your individual when we searched Gordon’s Solitary Bee Page.

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Subject: Mystery bug hiding on lupine
Location: Sunol-Ohlone Wilderness, CA
April 15, 2015 7:31 pm
I was taking a photo of the bee on the lupine, and only noticed later the insect that was upside down on the stalk. I have no idea what it is, can you please help me identify it?
Signature: R. Battaglia

Solitary Bee shares Lupine with Snakefly

Solitary Bee shares Lupine with Snakefly

Dear R. Battaglia,
The insect hiding along the stalk of the lupine is a Snakefly, in the order Raphidioptera, and according to BugGuide:  “Both larvae and adults are predatory, though they are capable of catching and killing only small and weak prey. Snakefly larvae feed on eggs and larvae of various insects, as well as adults of minute arthropods (e.g. mites, springtails, barklice, and homopterans). Adults typically prefer aphids but may eat a wide variety of arthropods.”
  Though females possess an ovipositor that resembles a stinger, Snakeflies are harmless to humans.  We are very curious about your Solitary Bee because of our interest our own in native pollinators and their relationship to native plants.  This may be a Leafcutter Bee in the genus Megachile, and BugGuide has many subgenera represented, but alas, we would need input from someone with more experience to provide a definitive identification.

Dear Mr. Marlos,
Thank you for the Snakefly ID.  Regarding the bee, although that particular picture was taken in Sunol, I do have a healthy population of leafcutters in my yard in Pleasanton, as evidenced by the many notched leaves of my Redbud.  I’ve had a fabulous collection of native pollinators in my yard this year!
Thanks again,
Robyn

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination