Currently viewing the category: "Solitary Bees"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Metalic Green Bee (Agapostemon)
Geographic location of the bug:  Central Mississippi
Date: 07/29/2019
Time: 03:38 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi! I got this lovely picture with my macro lens – thought you might like to add it to the page for this bee! 🙂
How you want your letter signed:  Elizabeth

Metallic Sweat Bee

Dear Elizabeth,
Thanks for sending in your lovely image of a Metallic Sweat Bee.  We generally don’t even attempt to identify them beyond the subfamily Halictinae because we don’t have the necessary skills to differentiate them further.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Megachilidae bee?
Geographic location of the bug:  Andover, NJ
Date: 06/03/2019
Time: 03:49 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi Daniel,
I was out in my pollinator garden snooping around this morning and discovered a large number of these small bees.  Size is about 1/3 inch.  They were in an area of my garden that has a bee house, but were not showing any signs of using it.  I am wondering, however, if these are mason bees?  Any help gratefully appreciated!
And I’m looking forward to a buggy summer.
How you want your letter signed:  Deborah E Bifulco

Solitary Bee

Dear Deborah,
While we agree this is a solitary Bee, we are uncertain of its exact identity.  It might be a Squash Bee, one of the Longhorned Bees in the genus
Peponapis.  According to BugGuide:  “these solitary ground nesting bees pollinate Cucurbitaceae more effectively than honeybees and line their brood cells with a waxlike material they secrete”.  Do you have squash in your garden?  We would not rule out that they might be Mason Bees in the family Megachilidae, which is well represented on BugGuide.  We believe that with many solitary Bees, males emerge earlier and they will patrol areas where there is both abundant food as well as favorable nesting areas in anticipation of the appearance of females with which to mate.  Male Bees will not be interested in your bee house.  We look forward to future submissions from your “pollinator garden”.  Perhaps one of our readers who has more experience keying out Solitary Bees will provide a more conclusive identification.

Solitary Bee

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Some sort of bee?
Geographic location of the bug:  Rocky River, Ohio
Date: 05/11/2019
Time: 08:52 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Some sort of bee sits on the same screen each spring and then seems to die. This year there are two. Do you know what kind of bug this is. Looks like a big bee.
How you want your letter signed:  Michelle

Possibly Eastern Carpenter Bees

Dear Michelle,
There is not enough detail in your image to be certain, but based on your description that they are big, and based on the fact that our editorial staff is currently just outside of Youngstown, Ohio and we have witnessed male Eastern Carpenter Bees on the wing right now, we suspect your visitors are also Eastern Carpenter Bees.

I didn’t want to get too close! I think you are right about being a carpenter bee. They never leave the screen though. Lazy carpenter bee maybe? Haha
Thanks for your input and prompt response. We have a big garden so maybe they are just waiting.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Please identify
Geographic location of the bug:  Westville (Ed. Note:  Presumably South Africa)
Date: 02/01/2019
Time: 06:22 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found this beautiful guy but not sure what it is?
How you want your letter signed:  Thanks Tammy

Carpenter Bee

Dear Tammy,
Is Westville in Canada, South Africa, the UK, California, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Mississippi, MIssouri, New Jersey, New York, Oklahoma or Pennsylvania?  Those are the choices Wikipedia provides.  We are going to guess South Africa.  We found matching images of the South African Carpenter Bee,
Xylocopa flavorufa, on both Alamy and FlickR.  It is also pictured on Discover Life and iNaturalist.

Yes South Africa. Thank you very much.
Never seen 1 before.
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Bug identification
Geographic location of the bug:  Iraq
Date: 12/12/2018
Time: 11:55 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear Mr. Bugman I found this kind of bee or bug on the street and it couldn’t fly for some reason… Its length about 3cm, width about 1cm
How you want your letter signed:  Raf

Carpenter Bee

Dear Raf,
This is a Carpenter Bee and we suspect it is a male because of the golden color.  Carpenter Bees in many parts of the world exhibit sexual dimorphism, meaning the males and females look very different from one another with females having black coloration and males having gold coloration.  See this image from our archives.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Sweat Bee?
Geographic location of the bug:  Silverdale, WA
Date: 09/28/2018
Time: 04:28 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I’m not sure if this is a sweat bee (possibly Agapostemon splendens) or some type of Flower loving or Syrphid fly.
It was roughly 1/3 inch in length, give or take a few millimeters.
I’m leaning more towards A. splendens, but to be honest, arachnids and mantises are more my forte.
How you want your letter signed:  Bug aficionado

Striped Sweat Bee

Dear Bug aficionado,
This is definitely a Metallic Sweat Bee in the family Halictidae, and we believe you have the genus
Agapostemon correct as well, however, the species Agapostemon splendens is not found in the Pacific Northwest based on BugGuide data.  Members of the genus Agapostemon are known as the Striped Sweat Bees because, according to BugGuide:  “Males are easier to ID because they have strongly black-and-yellow striped abdomen.”  According to Insect Identification for the Casual Observer:  “There are over a dozen species of Agapostemon Sweat Bees. Males are easier to identity than females because of their distinct coloring. The head and thorax of males are a metallic green, but its abdomen is comprised of the black and yellow bands typically seen in the bee family. Females of many species are mostly green all over. Some species are very social and share nests, while others are more solitary in nature.
Nests are burrows dug into dirt or banks. Pollen grains are collected and placed in each egg’s cell to provide food for the expected larva. For this reason, most sightings of adults occur around in or in gardens and meadows laden with blooms. Spring and summer are peak times of year for activity.
Adults drink flower nectar and eat pollen, and are not aggressive. They will sting in self-defense, however, if they are hit or almost crushed.
Agapostemon Sweat Bees sometimes get close to, or touch parts of, the body that are perspiring. They seem to enjoy drinking the salty liquid off of our skin. Some are so small and lightweight, they are able to do so without the person even realizing it!”  We are making your submission our Bug of the Month for October 2018.

Striped Sweat Bee

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination