Currently viewing the category: "Honey Bees"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Help!!!
Location: Miami, FL
July 14, 2017 8:08 pm
I have these bees in a crevice under a window ledge outside that is about 1.5 feet off the ground. The bees have been there since about beginning of June and fly around all day near the front door. I think they are honey bees. I’m not sure. I sprayed it crevice tonight with a foaming pesticide and a little while later I found a total of 4 over the course of two hours flying inside the house!
Signature: I bee worried

Honey Bee

Dear I bee worried,
This is indeed a dead Honey Bee.  Wild Honey Bees often form a new hive in protected areas of homes.  If you have a Honey Bee hive under your window ledge, you are not going to solve the problem with foaming pesticide.  You should contact a local bee keeper who will come and remove the hive.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: GRANNYS BATTLE !
Location: Orange ,CA.
May 26, 2017 7:02 am
Hello there bugman
So my mom and daughter thought this flying bugger was a simple house fly at first until they WHACKED it with the fly swatter ,The thing took a good wallop but didnt phase it just angered it ! LOL after about 20 minutes of running around the house being “chased” by this guy they were finally able to take him out . Not sure if its a wasp or what but we do have a honey bee nest out back in an old boat that every year they come back to ,Never have seen this kind of bee,wasp,hornet whatever it is but if you can identify it that would be AWESOME cuz now my 5 year old daughter has the dead bug in a jar that she wants to take to school and share with her class lol so here i am
PLEASE HELP sincerly justin keefe
Signature: Justin Keefe

Honey Bee

Dear Justin,
This is a beneficial Honey Bee.  Without Honey Bees, the cultivation of apples, almonds and avocados as well as many other important food crops would be seriously, negatively impacted.  There are people who believe farming as we know it might not exist without Honey Bees.  If your family is troubled by having a Honey Bee nest in your old boat, you should contact a local bee keeper who will happily remove the hive for you.  While we acknowledge that removing a Honey Bee from the home without killing it might prove a challenge as a threatened Honey Bee will sting, we strongly recommend attempting to capture it in a wine glass or other glass and slipping a post card under the rim so it can be safely transported outdoors.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Wild Honey Bee Hive
Location:  Elyria Canyon Park, Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
Date:  January 28, 2017 10:00 AM
We never had a chance to post this image we shot of a wild Honey Bee Hive in a hollow California Black Walnut Tree in Elyria Canyon Park.

Wild Honey Bee Hive

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Banded Garden Spider?
Location: Hialeah, Florida
September 8, 2016 7:43 am
I *think* this is a female Banded Garden Spider. I first saw it on August 14 and at first thought it was a tree snail due to the appearance of the back. The body was more than an inch long, and it stayed in its web in the same place for weeks, catching bees. I was rather hoping there would be a lot of baby spiders later, but a few weeks later there were 2 days of torrential rain during which time I didn’t look for her & when I did look, she was gone, leaving an intact web and no clue as to her disappearance. The third photo was one of a lucky series- I was taking a picture of her holding a webbed up bee when another bee landed in the web. She was on that second bee so fast I had to scramble to get pics! (I’ll send 3 more of the series in another query.)Spider webbing up caught bee. I chose these out of the series because one shows the bee clearly, and the other two do a fair job of showing the spinnerets in action.
Signature: Curious in Florida

Banded Garden Spider

Banded Garden Spider

Dear Curious in Florida,
Thanks for sending in your wonderful images of a Banded Garden Spider or Banded Orbweaver,
Argiope trifasciata.  They are an excellent addition to our archives.

Banded Garden Spider

Banded Garden Spider

Banded Garden Spider Snares Honey Bee

Banded Garden Spider Snares Honey Bee

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this eating another bug?
Location: Indianapolis, Indiana, usa
August 5, 2016 5:44 pm
Looked like a fat bodie dragonfly but with spiky legs. About two inches long. Eating what looked like a bee. Little furry.
Signature: tittyj

Red Footed Cannibalfly eats Honey Bee

Red Footed Cannibalfly eats Honey Bee

Dear tittyj,
We are pretty certain your predator is a Robber Fly known as a Red Footed Cannibalfly, and the prey appears to be a Honey Bee.  The tip of the abdomen indicates this individual is a male.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Assassin bug?
Location: Beavercreek, OH
August 24, 2015 3:18 am
This bug landed at our table at our local pool. It was carrying a bee & sat there for a few minutes with it’s stinger in the bees head feeding on it.
Signature: Kerry

Hanging Thief eats Robber Fly

Hanging Thief eats Robber Fly

Dear Kerry,
This is not an Assassin Bug.  It is a Robber Fly in the genus
Diogmites, a group known as the Hanging Thieves because they often hang from one leg while feeding.  They take prey on the wing, and this unfortunate Honey Bee stood no chance against such a formidable predator.  While Hanging Thieves and other Robber Flies are considered beneficial predators, they do not distinguish between eating beneficial pollinators and agricultural nuisance insects.  The mouth of the Hanging Thief is adapted to pierce and suck fluids from the body of the prey.  Hanging Thieves do not sting.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination