Currently viewing the category: "Bumble Bees"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: a type of bumble, or something else?
Location: West Seattle
May 31, 2013 5:22 pm
I have bees browsing a swath of pink geraniums in West Seattle.
Can you tell me what kind they are, or if they are juveniles of a common bee?
Signature: Terre Shattuck

Yellow Fronted Bumble Bees

Yellow Fronted Bumble Bees

Hi Terre,
Thanks to BugGuide, we were able to identify your Yellow Fronted Bumble Bees, Bombus flavifrons.  According to BugGuide:  “Widely distributed in US and Canada.”   These really are beautiful Bumble Bees.  We are postdating your submission to go live in early June while we are away from the office.

Yellow Fronted Bumble Bee

Yellow Fronted Bumble Bee

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Location: Andover, NJ, backyard
May 26, 2013 11:04 am
Hi BugGuy,
Hoping you can help me out with this bee. I live in northern NJ and saw this small bee today on my chive blossoms. There was also a carpenter bee on the blossoms, and this bee was roughly 1/2 the size of the carpenter, or about 1/2 inch (est). I’ve tried to find an ID for it and the closest I can come is that it may be some sort of digger bee?
Any help would be gratefully appreciated!
Signature: Deborah Bifulco

Bumble Bee

Bumble Bee

Dear Deborah,
In our opinion, this looks like a Bumble Bee in the genus
Bombus.  We often find identifying Bumble Bees to the species level to be a challenge, but you can try browsing the images on BugGuide for possibilities.

Bumble Bee

Bumble Bee

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Giant Bee!
Location: Toronto, ON, Canada
May 3, 2013 1:49 pm
This giant bee flew into my office not once, but twice! Early May, Toronto, ON Canada.
Very aggressive, about 2” long, maybe 0.5” thick. Was trying to sting the windowsill, left venom where it had stung the metal windowsill. Once caught in a cardboard box it could be heard and felt stinging the box…!
Signature: Best, Claire

Queen Bumblebee

Queen Bumblebee

Dear Claire,
Based on the behavior and size you described of the insect in this instagram image (not ideal for species identifications), we deduce this is a female Bumblebee recently emerged from Hibernation.  She is a aggressive because she wants to build her hive in some abandoned underground mouse burrow or bird house.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mating bees
Location: mason City, Ia
August 14, 2012 8:49 pm
Had to share a couple pictures of these bees that I almost stepped on in my backyard. Since they were not moving I went in to get my camera and captured the following pictures. Picture 1 is of the 2 bees in the grass(please note that we are going through a drought right now)picture 2 was taken after the 2 flew around the yard and landed on a bush. This is something I had never seen before and was glad to capture it.
Signature: Amber Olsen

Mating Bumble Bees

Hi Amber,
Thanks for sending your wonderful photos of mating Bumble Bees.  We wish we could determine the species.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to provide that information.

Mating Bumble Bees

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Yellow Faced Bumble Bee???
Location: Agate Beach Oregon coast
August 9, 2012 2:33 pm
I found this guy on my first trip to the Pacific coast. I was looking for seashells in the tide when I saw what I thought was a beetle at first moving extremely slow. I used a tiny piece of driftwood to pick him up. He proceded to crawl up my arm and groom himself. I was attempting to get a closer look at him in my hand when he climbed onto my nose. He walked up my face and nested in my hair and dried himself for a least 45 minutes while we continued to look for shells on the beach. As we left the beach I removed him from my hair and placed him in a beautiful flower bush where he finally fluttered his wings. He actually looked more fuzzy like a bee by the time he was placed in the flowers. (My phone battery had died at that point so I didn’t get another picture)
I hope he went on to live a happy bee life.
He looks similar to the other Yellow Faced Bumble Bees on your site but I’m only guessing. Could he have stung me?
I love your site it has helped me identify many bugs and spiders.
Thank you
Signature: Anna

Yellow Faced Bumble Bee rescued from surf.

Hi Anna,
It is difficult to be be certain since salt water has altered its appearance, but we agree that this is most likely a Yellow Faced Bumble Bee,
Bombus vosnesenskii.  Though Bumble Bees are not aggressive, they are capable of stinging.  Because of your kind deed, we are tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian AwardBugGuide has some nice images of Yellow Faced Bumble Bees under more typical circumstances.

Yellow Faced Bumble Bee dries out.

I just wanted to thank you for your quick response and the bug humanitarian award. 🙂 it made my day. I’m glad my little bee friend played nicely and didn’t sting me in the face. I have more pictures of myself with a bee on my face than I do of the actual coast. I got so focused on him I forgot to take other pictures.
Thanks again
Anna

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: European Bumblebee
Location: Belgrade, Serbia
May 23, 2012 3:26 pm
Dear Bugman,
I am trying to distinguish this bee: Is it a white-tailed bumblebee or a buff-tailed bumblebee? I photographed it in my driveway last weekend in Belgrade, Serbia.
Thank you!
Signature: Bill Kralovec

Bumble Bee from Serbia

Dear Bill,
Thanks for sending in your request.  Bumblebee.org indicates:  “The queens Bombus terrestris and B. lucorum are usually the first to emerge in the spring. B. terrestris queens are the largest bumblebees we have in the UK. It is fairly easy to differentiate between B. terrestris and B. lucorum queens –  the yellow thorax hairs of terrestris are more dull orangey while those of lucorum are more lemony [.]  B. terrestris has a brownish orange tip to her abdomen while B. lucorum’s is white – hence the common names.”  
Bumblebee.org also indicates:  “The workers of both species look like smaller versions of the lucorum queen. See the worker on the left. They are almost impossible to tell apart without dissection. The size range can vary quite a lot, but usually the smaller workers are from the earliest laid eggs. Bombus lucorum workers range from 0.04 – 0.32 g and the queens from 0.46 – 0.70 g; B. terrestris workers range from 0.05 g – 0.40 g.”  Our guess is that this is a queen White-Tailed Bumble Bee.  We are basing that on the information provided on the website we cited.  The early emergence and large size would indicate the bee is a queen.  Though many internet references use a single word Bumblebee, we are following the naming convention used on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination