Currently viewing the category: "Bumble Bees"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Orange and black bee presume
Geographic location of the bug:  Uk Dewsbury wf12ort
Date: 09/16/2018
Time: 07:19 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi I opened my door this morning to see a big black and Orange bee I think but not supposed to be in the UK  never seen this in all my 25 years
How you want your letter signed:  T.walker

Red Tailed Bumble Bee

Dear T.walker,
This Bumble Bee is so distinctive, we quickly found this Art by Tereska site with an illustration that includes the Red Tailed Bumble Bee,
Bombus lapidarius.  According to Bumblebee.org, it:  “is probably the most easily recognised species with its black body and bright orange tail.”  According to Nature Spot:  “Fairly common in Britain and have expanded northwards to include Scotland.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Beetle bee?!
Geographic location of the bug:  Lincoln Nebraska
Date: 08/22/2018
Time: 09:58 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hey bugman!
Question! May be an easy one but I’ve never seen anything like this before. I was sitting on my patio when this fella flew up. Looks like pollen maybe on the hind leg? It looks like a beetle and a bee but reminded me of a spider the way it sat and was quick moving like a startled spider?!
Thanks for the help!
How you want your letter signed:  Curious

Common Eastern Bumble Bee

Dear Curious,
As you can see from this BugGuide image, this is a Common Eastern Bumble Bee.  Perhaps due to pesticides, or habitat loss, or some other reason, populations of native and Honey Bees are on the decline, making these once very common and easily recognized insects much less familiar to the casual observer.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Don’t think it’s Bombus vosnesenskii, so which bumbler is it?
Geographic location of the bug:  Silverdale, WA
Date: 07/12/2018
Time: 12:20 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I originally thought this was Bombus vosnesenskii (Yellow-Faced bumble bee), but all photos representing that particular species shows only one  yellow segment on the abdomen, whereas the one I took the photograph of, shows two.
I tried researching by location and bee color/appearance on discoverlife.org‘s bee identification, but none seem to match. Based upon the appearance of pollen baskets and sparse hairs on the hind legs, I am pretty sure it’s a true bumble been (not a Cuckoo) and a female.
If you are able to help, I’d love your assistance!
Thanks in advance!
How you want your letter signed:  Bug aficionado

Yellow Faced Bumble Bee

Dear Bug Aficionado,
When we first looked at your images, we too began trying to match to BugGuide images of a Bumble Bee with a yellow face as well as two abdominal stripes, but upon reviewing your images, we believe the second yellow band we thought we observed on one of your images is an optical illusion, part of the clover blossom rather than the Bee.  None of your images clearly shows a second yellow band.  Perhaps you have additional images that show the markings on the abdomen.  Since we cannot clearly see a second band, we are going to call this a Yellow Faced Bumble Bee as the yellow face as well as other markings, including the half black thorax, agree with that species.  Also, the Yellow Faced Bumble Bee pictured on Hilltromper does appear to show a second abdominal stripe.  The Arboretum Foundation page entitled Getting to Know Our Northwest Bees identifies four species including the Yellow Faced Bumble Bee.

Yellow Faced Bumble Bee

I think you are right about the optical illusion! I zoomed in on the photo, and, sure enough, what I thought was a second yellow abdominal segment is actually one of the clover head’s flowers!
Thanks so much for your help! Trying to ID this fuzzy-butt was driving me bonkers!
Also, thank you for correcting the ID of my blue butterfly from Spring Azure (Celastrina ladon) to Pacific Azure (Celastrina echo). They both look very much alike, and despite butterfliesandmoths.org having a verified sighting of C. ladon in Oregon (which is what led me to my ID- I simply didn’t research enough), it is quite likely that they, too, mis-identified the specimen.
-Bug aficionado

Yellow Faced Bumble Bee

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Bombus ternarius
Geographic location of the bug:  North-West BC, Canada
Date: 06/11/2018
Time: 03:14 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Looks like a Bombus ternarius to me, but I’m new to bumble bees.
How you want your letter signed:  Shawn C

Tri-Colored Bumble Bee

Dear Shawn,
Based on this BugGuide image, we are in agreement that this is a Tri-Colored Bumble Bee,
Bombus ternarius.  According to BugGuide:  “First abdominal segment with yellow hair, segments 2 & 3 reddish-orange, segments 5 and 6 and facial hairs black.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Funny looking bee and Orb Weaver
Geographic location of the bug:  Bee from South Weber, Utah. Orb Weaver from Sardine Canyon, Utah
Date: 05/14/2018
Time: 02:27 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I have no idea what these two are, besides being a bee and an orb weaver spider (it had an orb web).
Please help me identify these. Feel free to use the photos as you wish.
How you want your letter signed:  William Swedin

Hunt’s Bumble Bee, we believe

Dear William,
There are several species of Bumble Bees with red markings.  The closest visual match we were able to find is this Hunt’s Bumble Bee,
Bombus huntii, pictured on BugGuide.  Please confine your identification requests to a single species unless there is a good reason to include more than one species, like a Food Chain image.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Wazzat bug?
Geographic location of the bug:  Snohomish, WA
Date: 09/04/2017
Time: 04:25 PM EDT
OK, bug guys (&gals!) – whaddizzit?
This bug was crawling around my garage today. At the tender age of 62, I thought I’d seen most of the common creepy-crawlers/flyers. Looks like a type of beetle, but image search and on-line research has not helped. Lemme know if I have discovered something that was thought to be extinct, and hasn’t been known to fly/crawl them thar parts for millions of years. I’m guessing that’s most probably the case. Surely it is related to some rare dinosaur. Make my day – tell me I’m right! But wait – I let it go free. OH, NO!
How you want your letter signed:  Sandi Ellenwood

Yellow Faced Bumble Bee

Dear Sandi,
This is a Bumble Bee, and according to A Field Guide to Common Puget Sound Native Bees, it appears to be a Yellow Faced Bumble Bee,
Bombus vosnesenskii.  The Arboretum Foundation has a Getting to know our native northwest bees page that also mentions and pictures the Yellow Faced Bumble Bee.  According to BugGuide:  “The most abundant and widespread species in cismontane California and generally numerous across the Pacific States at lower elevations.”  We are surprised that your letter indicates you take an interest in “creepy-crawlers” but that you did not recognize a Bumble Bee.  We are well aware of decreasing populations of both native and domestic Bees, probably due to the wide use of pesticides, which might explain why you have never seen a Bumble Bee in 62 years, but at least they are not yet extinct.

Yellow Faced Bumble Bee

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination