Currently viewing the category: "Bees"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this?
Location: Folsom, California
July 19, 2017 6:24 am
What is this big and what does it do?
Signature: Cindy

Male Valley Carpenter Bee

Dear Cindy,
This is a male Valley Carpenter Bee, and we suppose his main purpose in life is to mate with a sexually dimorphic, black, female Valley Carpenter Bee.  While awaiting that opportunity, he will also pollinate flowers.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Help!!!
Location: Miami, FL
July 14, 2017 8:08 pm
I have these bees in a crevice under a window ledge outside that is about 1.5 feet off the ground. The bees have been there since about beginning of June and fly around all day near the front door. I think they are honey bees. I’m not sure. I sprayed it crevice tonight with a foaming pesticide and a little while later I found a total of 4 over the course of two hours flying inside the house!
Signature: I bee worried

Honey Bee

Dear I bee worried,
This is indeed a dead Honey Bee.  Wild Honey Bees often form a new hive in protected areas of homes.  If you have a Honey Bee hive under your window ledge, you are not going to solve the problem with foaming pesticide.  You should contact a local bee keeper who will come and remove the hive.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: White bee with green on head
Location: Los Angeles
July 13, 2017 10:19 am
Found this here at my house in Los Angeles what???
Love to send a picture.
Signature: Linda Holler

Metallic Green Sweat Bee

Dear Linda,
This is a Metallic Green Sweat Bee, similar to the one in this BugGuide image, but we are unable to provide you with a species name.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Carpenter bee?
Location: Albuquerque, NM
July 10, 2017 12:48 pm
Hi – This bee was climbing in a hole the size of my pinkie in a wooden overhang. It was painted, but im not sure if the bee created this hole or the prior owner had drilled a hole leaving exposed wood. It was striped and where he was chewing, the wood began to swell. he never went fully in, just around the edge. I filled the hole with caulk and he went away. Thia is in Albuquerque, NM at about 5500 ft elevation in the hills. It was taken in June.
Signature: KJ

Mason Bee

Dear KJ,
This looks to us like a Mason Bee in the family Megachilidae, possibly
Lithurgopsis apicalis which is pictured on BugGuide.  Of the family, BugGuide notes:  “Some are leaf-cutters, nesting in ground, in cavities, wood. Tunnels are bored in wood or in the ground. Cell is provisioned with pollen (and nectar?), an egg laid, and cell is sealed over with circular pieces of leaves, clay or other materials that fit tightly into cavity.”

Mason Bee

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unknown Black Bee visits Wisteria
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
June 6, 2017 7 PM
While we were away from the office, the potted wisteria did not get watered enough and it dropped all its leaves, forcing it into an unseasonal bloom cycle.  Late in the afternoon, this little black Bee visited the plant.  It is half the size of a female Carpenter Bee, and try though we might, we could not match it to any Bumble Bee or other Bee on BugGuide.  The identity of this little Black Bee is unknown.

Unknown Black Bee

Potted Wisteria

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: cannot even decide what family…
Location: prairie 5 miles from foothills, Longmont CO
July 5, 2017 9:44 am
This large (3/4 inch) insect began flying into our garage regularly in June, emitting such an awful buzz that it sounded very like a UAS (drone). It came every day, circled around until it found its favorite niche (dark corner under steps to house proper) and then went quiet for a while. We thought it might be laying eggs. Not sure how to feel about that! We live in the country near Longmont CO. Any clues?
Signature: Linda

Brown-Belted Bumble Bee

Dear Linda,
This is a beneficial, native Bumble Bee, and of all the species pictured on the Color Guide to Colorado Bees on the Applewood Seed website, we believe it most resembles the Brown-Belted Bumble Bee,
Bombus griseocollis.  According to BugGuide:  “After B. impatiens often the second most commonly encountered bumble bee at many sites in the eastern United States. However, it becomes relatively scarce northwards, as at Ithaca.”   There are some very nice images on Discover Life

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination