Currently viewing the category: "attack of the fungus"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bright pink eggs?
Location: KwaZulu-Natal
February 16, 2017 5:35 pm
Can the small bright pink bubbles be an egg of some kind. They appeared in my garden overnight. They were found above the soil. They appear to have areflectors tough but soft exterior with bright pink liquid centre. Comparable to a paintball bullet but small in size.
Signature: Jolene

Slime Mold

Hi Jolene,
In our opinion, this looks like fungus and not eggs.  We found this similar FlickR image and a link to this Slime Mold posting on the Field Guide to the Fungi of New England.  This FlickR image identifies the Slime Mold as
Lycogales epidendrum.  Based on iSpot, this Slime Mold, also called Pink Bubblegum Fungus, is found in South Africa.

Thank you so much for your help and clarification.
What an excellent response time and service.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Two insects and Cordyceps
Location: Ecuador, Yasuni adjacent to Napo River
February 4, 2017 8:34 am
During January 2017 I was in the Yasuni area, adjacent to the Napo River of Ecuador. During the hours of darkness I was photographing the very small insect on the top of the plant that had been infected by the cordyceps fungus. When along flew the green insect and settled beside the dead one. Body size of the insect is about 2cm or 3/4 of an inch. Is the green insect an assassin bug and what type? Do you think both insects are the same? There had been a lot of rain at the time I was there. It was very hot and humid and low altitude.
Signature: Moira

Assassin Bug Nymph and Adult Assassin with Fungus Infection

Dear Moira,
Both insects in your stunning image are Assassin Bugs.  The one with the Fungus Infection is a winged adult and the other an immature, wingless nymph, but we cannot state for certain that they are the same species, but we believe that is a good possibility.  You indicated that the living one “flew” and we suspect you stated that incorrectly as it has no wings.  Again, you image is positively stunning.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: White spider
Location: Southern Minnesota
December 19, 2016 1:57 pm
Found tons of these in my friend’s basement and barn. I think it is a cellar spider but when I touched it it took off crawling. They were everywhere. What could cause the white coloration? And every one I tried to touch crawled away
Signature: T. Arends

Cellar Spider with Fungus Infection

Cellar Spider with Fungus Infection

Dear T. Arends,
This is a Cellar Spider and it has a lethal fungus infection.  If it was indeed alive and it crawled away, it is not long for this world.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s that bug eggs
Location: Side of house Michigan
October 29, 2016 11:59 am
I found some bugs egg so what’s that bug
Signature: Dave

Bird's Nest Fungus

Bird’s Nest Fungus

Dear Dave,
These are NOT eggs.  You have a healthy colony of Bird’s Nest Fungus,
Cyathus olla, and you can read more about Bird’s Nest Fungus on Wayne’s Word where it states it is “a tiny cup-shaped fungus containing minute flattened spheres resembling eggs in a bird’s nest.”  According to Gardening Know How:  “The fungus doesn’t harm any living plants or organisms and assist in the important cycle of soil renewal. For this reason, getting rid of bird’s nest fungus is not necessary for the health of your garden. However, if the sticky fruiting bodies adhere to siding or other items, they can be difficult to remove. In this case, bird’s nest fungus control should consist of repelling tactics.”

Bird's Nest Fungus

Bird’s Nest Fungus

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: More Spider Fungus?
Location: Milwaukee, WI
September 18, 2016 1:45 pm
Took this photo in the crypt area in the basement of the Cavalry Cemetery Chapel in Milwaukee, WI. A living spider is in the picture too as well as something else that is much more prominent. It reminded me of this: https://www.wired.com/2012/12/spider-building-spider/, but then I saw your posts and concluded that it was a living spider alongside a dead one overtaken by fungus (definitely dead because I touched it and, thank goodness, it didn’t move!). I wonder if the living one will soon suffer the same fate. Anyway, I thought you’d like another photo of this phenomena. Thanks for your great website!
Signature: Allison Jornlin

Spider with Fungus Infection

Spider with Fungus Infection

Dear Allison,
Thank you for submitting your image of a Cellar Spider infected with fungus.  There has been quite a robust challenge to our stand that these Fungus Riddled Spiders are generally dead.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Cocoon
Location: Westminster Maryland
April 3, 2016 10:43 am
In pine tree
Signature: Barry

Cedar Apple Rust Gall

Cedar Apple Rust Gall

Hi Barry,
This is not a cocoon.  It is a Gall.  According to Wayne’s Word:  “Galls are caused by many organisms living on plants, including insects, mites, mistletoe, fungi and bacteria.”  This marvelous website continues with “The mysterious origin of strange growths on the stems, leaves, flowers and roots of plants have intrigued naturalists for centuries. Called galls or hypertrophies, these tumorous (neoplasmic) outgrowths develop from rapid mitosis and morphogenesis of plant tissues and come in an astounding array of colors, shapes and sizes. Galls may be smooth, spiny or fuzzy, and resemble everything from marbles and ping-pong balls to dunce caps, saucers and sea urchins. Many galls provide the food and brooding structure for various species of harmless insects.”  The Propaedeuticist makes up in images what it lacks in information regarding your particular Gall, the Cedar Apple Rust Gall,
Gymnosporangium juniperivirginianae.  The Missouri Botanical Garden also refers to two additional, closely related species of fungus in stating:  “All three rusts can infect most varieties of eastern red cedar (Juniperus virginiana) as well as many other junipers and an alternate host. Of these alternate hosts, cedar-apple rust is primarily a disease of apples and crabapples. Cedar-hawthorn rust, in addition to affecting apples and crabapples, sometimes infects pears, quince, and serviceberry. Cedar-quince rust has the broadest host range and can infect many genera in the rose family. In addition to those plants already mentioned, mountain-ash, flowering quince, cotoneaster, chokecherry, and photinia are also hosts for this disease.”  Your tree is a cedar, not a pine.  The Missouri Botanical Garden site also states:  “Symptoms on juniper: Brown, perennial galls form on twigs. When mature (usually in two years), the galls swell and repeatedly produce orange, gelatinous telial horns during rainy spring weather. The galls of cedar-apple rust are often over 2 inches in diameter, while cedar-hawthorn rust galls are rarely over 2 inches in diameter. Occasionally the twig beyond the gall dies, but usually no significant damage occurs on the juniper host.”  If you or a neighbor has an apple orchard, there may be additional cause for alarm as the site states as the leaves of apple trees are affected, according to the Missouri Botanical Garden, when:  “Circular, yellow spots (lesions) appear on the upper surfaces of the leaves shortly after bloom. In late summer, brownish clusters of threads or cylindrical tubes (aecia) appear beneath the yellow leaf spots or on fruits and twigs. The spores associated with the threads or tubes infect the leaves (needles) and twigs of junipers during wet, warm weather.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination
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