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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Lefty and Digitalis have 8 swimming fry
February 20, 2010
Two weeks ago, Lefty and Digitalis laid eggs on the filter intake pipe again.  They have been laying eggs every two weeks since last year when their second brood was removed to the grow out aquarium.  The eggs either have grown fungus, or the fry have died before becoming free swimming.  Two weeks ago, I collected rain water for addition to the aquarium (about 4 gallons) and I began feeding the pair some live mosquito larvae that developed in an outdoor water storage area.  When the eggs hatched, I shut off the filter to prevent the wrigglers from getting sucked in.  The pair moved the wrigglers between a plant leaf and the pipe for several days.  Three days ago, the young started falling from the pipe and were captured in the parent’s mouths and returned.  I decided to hatch some brine shrimp just in case.  Three days ago, the fry started swimming some.  There were about 20.  Two days ago, after a day of swimming, the parents collected the fry to spend the night on the driftwood branch that has replaced the dying Amazon Sword Plant.  I also tried to remove as many tiny snails as possible, though that is a losing battle.  Yesterday, there were only 8 fry remaining, but they are swimming and eating newly hatched brine shrimp.

Digitalis with some fry

I am finally ready to post some new photos of Angelfish fry, and I am hoping these 8 guys survive.  I am at least encouraged that my Angelfish may start to produce broods of young again.

Digitalis and Fry

I never figured out why the eggs of either pair were not viable between September and January.  I am not sure if it is water conditions, or diet, but whatever the reason, things may be turning around.

Lefty (top), Digitalis and Fry

February 23, 2010
The day after posting, the number of swimming fry dropped to only 4, but they are still alive and eating well.

February 26, 2010
Two days ago, Lefty and Digitalis laid more eggs on the filter intake pipe.  This morning the hatched wrigglers were moved by the parents to the driftwood.  There are still four remaining fry, so it will be interesting to see what happens with two broods in the same aquarium.  Perhaps I should move the four larger fry to the nursery aquarium, but I feel I should let nature take its course and trust that the parents know how to deal with older siblings.

March 2, 2010
Alas, there is but one remaining fry from the first recent spawning, but there are about 100 new small fry that are just beginning to swim.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Insect larvae ? aquatic.
January 16, 2010
This “being” is attached to my aquarium glass wall. It flows with the movement of the water circulation with one end attached to the glass. It looks at first glance like a grub. A teeny grub. It is at most 1/4 inch. The attached end is a dark brown and the far end has a small dark area. The body is a light color and seems (accordion shaped) slightly extend-able like a caterpillar or grub. It is somewhat bristly…to catch food?
Could this be a crane fly larvae? I recently introduced some plants to the aquarium and they may have introduced this animal. It may remain an aquatic being and therefore would not technically be an insect. The water is mostly freshwater with the slightest amount of sea salt.I’m slowly introducing salt to a red claw crab that started life in a pet store’s fresh water tank.
It may not b a bug at all and would not be fall in “What’sThat Bug” jurisdiction.
swarner
Fredericksburg Va mostly freshwater aquarium

Unknown Aquarium Creature

addendum to ” Insect larvae aquatic
January 16, 2010
Further notes. BW pics are clearer to read. The unattached area of the “being” seems to periodically expand like a balloon. It is attached with a cord like piece near the bottom of the tank and has no air available.
I’ve become obsessed and am going blind looking through a magnifying glass. I do hope you can give it a name!
swarner
aquarium…

Unknown Aquarium Creature

Dear swarner,
We are very intrigued by your creature, though we aren’t certain at this point what it might be.  Creatures that appear in aquaria are a special curiosity for us.  Hopefully, time will provide an identification for this creature.  We strongly recommend that you attach a comment to this posting which will automatically provide a notification if someone else comments down the line.

Karl to the rescue!!!
Daniel:
I am inclined to think that this is the larvae of an aquatic moth, probably a snout moth in the family Pyralidae, which includes most or all lepidoptera with truly aquatic larvae. It is difficult to see much clear detail from either of the photos, but I think I can make out the reduced prolegs with crochets (hooks) in the black and white photo.  Compare this photo to close-ups of the crochets and the terminal abdominal segment of a pyralid larva provided on the ‘Digital Key to Aquatic Insects of North Dakota’ site. The larvae of aquatic Lepidoptera are almost always associated with aquatic plants and can be stem borers, leaf miners or leaf feeders. Regards.
Karl

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

January 3, 2010
Aquarium #1, the original 40 gallon tall aquarium now contains the original pair of Angelfish, Boris and Media Luna, and they continue to lay eggs every two weeks, and I have stopped trying to raise the fry.  I have not had a successful batch of fry since September of last year.  After five successful spawnings, there began to be high mortality rates for the fry.  The aquarium also contains 4 of the original 6 Rams, 7 of the original 10 Cardinal Tetras, 2 of the original 4 Black Phantom Tetras, and 5 of the original 12 False Emperor Tetras.  All of the Algae Eaters and Panda Catfish died in a short period of time.  There has been an outbreak of tiny snails in both this aquarium and the 29 gallon aquarium containing the Angelfish Lefty and Digitalis.  The water quality seems fine, and the water is clear.  The algae growth seems to be under control, but I still have no luck keeping Amazon Sword Plants alive and the Eel Grass also languishes.  Boris and Media Luna laid eggs today.  They are hiding behind the plant on the left, guarding their eggs, in the photo.

Community Aquarium #1

Community Aquarium #1

Aquarium #2, the Grow Out Aquarium, contains 9 out of 10 Rummy Nose Tetras, a singly Cory Cat, and at least 35 Angelfish offspring from both pairs of parents.  Some of the largest fry have a body size of about a quarter of a dollar, and the smallest are much smaller, with the body of about my pinky fingernail.  These fry were from August and September spawnings.  I plan to take the largest of the young to Tropical Imports in the next week or so and trade them for food.  Some of the Angelfish have a strong gold coloration despite all the parents having the wild striped pattern.  Most of the young resemble the parents.

Grow Out Aquarium #2

Grow Out Aquarium #2

Aquarium #3 contains only the Angelfish Lefty and Digitalis who successfully raised two broods of about 50 fry for six weeks, spawning again shortly after the fry were removed.  They have a large proportion of eggs that fungus over, and the few fry that start to swim die within a few days.  I believe there is something amiss with the water, and I wonder if our winter water supply in Los Angeles differs from the Spring and Summer water supply.  Not having youngsters has not been a problem as they would be difficult to raise in the three aquariums I currently have.  The nursery aquarium has been temporarily emptied and it will be put into use again the next time there are viable fry from Boris and Media Luna that are rescued with a turkey baster.  This aquarium does not have a light and I cannot take a photo tonight.

Media Luna with Eggs

Media Luna with Eggs

I took a few additional photos of Boris and Media Luna with their freshly laid eggs.  Boris was on the other side of the aquarium, and I needed to coax him toward the eggs by moving my hand near the glass, a potential threat.

Boris (left) and Media Luna with eggs

Boris (left) and Media Luna with eggs

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

That Fish Bug!
October 14, 2009
Oh, my goodness! I see you’ve been bitten by the fish bug, too! I loved the pics of your aquariums and reading your adventures raising Angelfish. It sounds like you’re learning well and are quickly finding out the addictive power of the phrase, “Just one more tank….” (haha)

A quick note on cycling: once you have _established bacteria colonies_ in your filters, you can quickly cycle new tanks in the house by squeezing some of that filter media into the new tank (before adding fish) and letting the new filter suck it all in. This colonizes your filter media and gets you jump-started so you won’t go through so much of the new cycling headache/heartache.

Also–there is far less need to change filter media than those selling you the media make you think. The important thing is the _bacteria:_ not what it’s growing on. Some rinsing in old tank water to remove detritus is usually all that’s necessary unless/until the media seems to be falling apart.

You’re like me: anxious to fill that new tank with fish! I had to smile.

Also like me–there’s a bit of a tendency to overload the tank. I counted about 34 fish listed in your 40 gallon–not counting fry. With much respect, I offer the counsel that even with live plants, that may be far too many fish…. The rule of thumb is not 1 gallon per fish, but 1 gallon per *body inch* of fish: meaning, don’t count fins, but measuring from nose to the end of the body (beginning of the caudal fin). Most of the Tetras you listed reach about 2″ in length as adults. Adult size should be considered when stocking the tank as well (or…. you can always buy another tank! or trade back in–it sounds like you have a terrific local fish store there).

Also, some fish, like plecos, goldfish, and Oscars, are considered “messy” fish due to their high waste output, and “count” as more than 1 gallon per “fish inch.” An Oscar, for example, rates as taking up 50-75 gallons of “tank space” even though they are 12″ fish.

That said, you sound on top of your game with waterchanges and testing, and fish care in general–and live plants can and do help with the fish load. Frequent waterchanges can also do the trick. But overloading does make the fishkeeping more difficult overall, in case you miss a change or a water test.

I’m raising Betta fish at my house. My first fry are entering a show this weekend, and my second set are a week old–they look a lot like the Angel fry when they begin to be freeswimming, only, much smaller.

I just wanted to share my thumbs-up.
Your tanks are beautiful, and it was fun to read through your adventures!
Linda

Thanks for your comments Linda,
WE are actually pretty careful with our tank population.  Right now, the original community aquarium has a pair of Angelfish (Boris and Media Luna) that spawn every few weeks, 6 Rams, 7 Cardinal Tetras, 5 False Emperor Tetras and 4 Black Phantom Tetras.  The grow out 40 gallon aquarium has about 60 angelfish fry, 9 rummy nose tetras, 1 platy and 1 cory cat.  Another 29 gallon aquarium has a pair of Angelfish (Lefty and Digitalis) that spawn less frequently since we let them raise their own fry for about 6 weeks.

Terrific!
I must have read further back (earlier on in the blog) or added fish up incorrectly. My apologies. I think where I was reading and adding was with the first tank during the initial cycling period or right after, possibly.
I can tell you are excellent and caring fishkeepers – and what amazing luck to buy 4 grown Angels and have 2 pair!
Enjoy! Very nice to meet you!!
I just meant that, it is soooooo easy to fall in love and bring them home!
Aren’t they wonderful?!
Linda

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

October 2, 2009
Yesterday Boris and Media Luna spawned again.  The last three batches of young all had extremely high mortality rates.  Only one of the most recent spawning lived, and two lived long enough to be moved to the grow out aquarium on the previous spawning.  Prior to that, 13 youngsters were raised.  Hopefully, there will be better luck with this new spawn.

Media Luna with yesterday's spawning

Media Luna with yesterday's spawning

October 3, 2009
Boris and Media Luna’s eggs hatched and they moved the brood.  Some fry have strayed from the leaf and been eaten by the Cardinal Tetras.  Last night, Lefty and Digitalis also laid eggs, or perhaps it was early this morning.  This batch of eggs seems viable.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

September 20, 2009
Two days ago, Boris and Media Luna spawned again.  The eggs were laid on the leaf of a new plant I purchased two weeks ago at Pasadena Tropical Imports.  Today the eggs hatched.

Boris and Media Luna Spawn Again

Boris (rear) and Media Luna Spawn Again

This newest spawning seems precarious.  The other fish in the aquarium swim close and are not chased away as when the spawning site is more secluded.  The location is also close to the filter return site and that may result in the small fry being carried away in the stream.

Boris and Media Luna Spawn again

Boris and Media Luna (front) Spawn again

I took 10 Fry to Tropical Imports today and traded them for frozen bloodworms.

Ten Fry taken to Tropical Imports

Ten Fry taken to Tropical Imports

I am catching the 7 week old fry that Lefty and Digitalis spawned on August 1.  The fry have been living with the parents for seven weeks and they are ready to go to the grow out tank since it looks like Digitalis is filling with eggs.  I have captured 20 + 18 + 11 for a total of 49 Fry.

Update
October 2, 2009
Boris and Media Luna’s spawn was moved into the nursery aquarium, and there was a tremendous mortality rate.  Only one youngster is alive.  This is now four spawns in a row that have nearly all  died.  This is quite confusing.  Lefty and Digitalis also spawned, but the eggs grew fungus and there were no hatchlings.  Yesterday, Boris and Media Luna spawned again.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination