Currently viewing the category: "aquarium"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Pentodon species identification
Geographic location of the bug:  Žagubica, Serbia.
Date: 12/20/2018
Time: 01:16 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Thanks to iNaturalist community I found out that the genus of this Coleoptera is Pentodon spp. but I can’t figure out what species it is because all of them look the same to me, and I couldn’t find any keys for this genus online. The specimen was collected in June 2017 (not by me). According this site: http://bioras.petnica.rs/pretraga.php?searchtext=pentodon
there are only 3 species (and one subspecies) in Serbia, so it’s likely one of them, but again they look practically the same to me. The insect is just under 2 cm. I can try to take additional photos if necessary.
How you want your letter signed:  Regards, Mihajlo

Scarab Beetle

Dear Mihajlo,
We are not familiar with this genus of Scarab Beetles, but since it is in the subfamily Dynastinae, the Rhinoceros Beetles, we suspect this is a female since most males in this subfamily have fantastic horns.  Females present an additional identification challenge as they are often quite similar looking.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to provide additional information.  We get so few submissions from Serbia.

Scarab Beetle

Thank you for your reply. In the meantime I found out what species it is. Someone from iNaturalist who is also from Serbia said that there is actually only one species in Serbia which is Pentodon idiota.
Regards,
Mihajlo

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Date:  February 9, 2017
We just received a very nice comment from Jack Dempsey on a very old posting of our mated pair of Angelfish, Boris and Medea Luna.  Though our aquarium has nothing to do with bugs (except we feed our fish mosquito larvae and bloodworms), our editorial staff added an Aquarium tag to WTB? to document our escapades.  Sadly, none of the four Angelfish we purchased on March 27, 2009 are still alive, but Hector who was born and raised in our aquarium in the spring of 2011 is big and beautiful and he lives in his own aquarium with a single Rummynose Tetra.  His body is well over three inches across and he is nearly 7 inches high.  He is a magnificent fish.

Hector is our last Angelfish.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: blood worms
Location: Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
May 1, 2017 9:18 pm
Though it might make us unpopular with the neighbors, we keep standing water in the yard for wildlife, and we skim with a net daily to feed Mosquito Larvae to the Angelfish, and Boris is still thriving alone in his tank since killing Medea Luna several years ago.  This week the Mosquito Larvae have been replaced by Blood Worms, the larvae of non-biting Midges, and Boris has been greedily eating everyone put in the tank.

Blood Worms

 

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Boris and Medea Luna turn Somersaults in the Aquarium
January 5, 2013

Boris & Medea Luna lock jaws.

We haven’t done an aquarium update in quite some time, so we are long overdue.  Boris and Medea Luna have been living in the fifty gallon aquarium for several years now.  They currently share the aquarium with a school of Rummy Nose Tetras, a school of Serpae Tetras, a school of Glowlight Tetras, five golden X-Ray Tetras, some Cardinal and Neon Tetras, six Silver Hatchet Fish, two large Plecostomus, two Indian Killifish (the only non-Amazon fish), a Corydoras Catfish and one odd Tetra.  They continue to spawn erratically, but the Tetras, which are really just small Piranas, always eat the eggs as they are laid.  Boris and Medea Luna attempt to chase the other aquarium dwellers away from the spawning site to no avail.  We stopped trying to raise their young as they were often deformed.  Boris and Medea Luna still fight and court, and Boris has bitten off her pectoral fins much like he did to Lefty many years ago.  Medea Luna is often the aggressor and she often initiates the activities.  Occasionally the Angelfish kill a Tetra that is moving too slowly, but the other fish have learned to avoid the Angelfish when they are defending territory.  

Boris initiates the flip.

The History of Boris and Medea Luna
Boris and Medea Luna, a pair of Angelfish, have been in our care since March 27, 2009, when we brought four Angelfish home from Pasadena Tropical Fish.  Within five days, we had a spawing, but three fish seemed to be involved.  Eventually Boris and Medea Luna proved to be the dominant pair and started to attack the other female, who we eventually named Digitalis.  She and her mate Lefty lived for several years in their own aquarium and they produced numerous spawning before dying in in 2011.  Boris and Medea Luna always lived in a community aquarium with Rams and Cardinal Tetras, and they protected numerous spawings from the other fish in the aquarium.  We always waited for the eggs to hatch before removing the wriggling fry with a turkey baster and raising the fry in a nursery aquarium.

Boris and Medea Luna flipping.

Here are Boris and Medea Luna on their second anniversary in Mount Washington.

Boris and Medea Luna lock and swim toward the surface.

Boris and Medea Luna begin a new cycle.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

May 18, 2012
In the Aquarium by the west window.

Hector (right) and Luna with their first brood

The fry have been free swimming for about a week.  I believe the eggs were laid about two weeks ago, before Paris and Helen laid eggs.  Paris and Helen, the gold pair, are raising a brood of their own.
Algae is growing because I removed the Plecostomus.  As soon as the fry get large enough, I am going to move the plecostomus back to help keep algae under control.  Perhaps I will get a new plecostomus for that aquarium and keep one in each aquarium, but move them all into the tank with Boris and Medea Luna who are no longer bearing pretty spawn.

Fry with Luna

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Aquarium Update:  May 9, 2012
There has been so much change and transition in the aquaria.  First a silver pair of Angelfish paired off and were moved to the aquarium by the window where they are living with their three day free swimming fry.  What I believe is a pair of golden Angelfish (I decided I would name the first gold fish to produce viable fry Paris, be it male or female.  Seems I most likely have a pair of golden Angelfish.  There are wrigglers and also a batch of non viable eggs, but they seem to have formed a relationship with a silver striped Angelfish.  I am reluctant to narrow the tank to two fish until I am sure who laid the viable eggs.  The viable eggs were laid on a piece of slate. The hatchlings were moved.  The three silver Angelfish and one gold fish stayed behind the slate when fry were moved to plant in foreground.  Then more eggs were laid on the plant in the foreground, but I am not sure by which fish.  There is little doubt the pair are the gold fish.  Three of the fish were taken to Tropical Imports, but then the third fish seemed to join the pair.

Paris in the back and Helen on the right.

On the light green leaf on the left in the aquarium is a brood of wrigglers that were moved shortly after I took this photo.  In the foreground are the nonviable eggs turning white.

Helen, probably the female in the pair.

Update:  May 18, 2012
I could tell the fry were hidden in the back of the large plant, however, I couldn’t see them.  Then the fry were moved into view.  As soon as the fry started swimming, I came home to find the silver anglefish, still unnamed, gobbling up swimming fry.  I got a bit nervous and caught him and just dumped him unceremoniously into the aquarium in the bathroom, the nursery aquarium.  A few minutes later, I noticed three fry in the nursery aquarium with him.  I scooped them out with a cup and returned them to Paris and Helen.  I still am not certain if Paris fertilized the eggs.  I think I will keep the striped male until I am certain, however, I may ask Tropical Imports to board him.

 

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination