Currently viewing the category: "Aphids, Scale Insects, Leafhoppers, and Tree Hoppers"
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tentacled moth?
I know a bit about bugs, certainly enough, to know this bug certainly defies classification in any normal group. Sadly it was already dead when I found it, and I actually caught it thinking it was simply a plant wisp caught in the breeze. Upon further inspection I found a very little insect body attatched to all the wispys. I’m of the mind that it is some kind of moth with incredibly strange wings (which are quite sticky, its a very hard bug to put down). Please let me know if you have any idea what this creature is, I haven’t had any luck. The pictures aren’t the best, but on the close up you can see it has legs and a head. I figure with the strange wing wisps it shouldn’t be hard to either identify or recognize as a new critter.
Thanks, Duncan
West Chester, PA

Hi Duncan,
Eric Eaton helped us to correct this one. He writes: This is a “woolly aphid of some kind. There aren’t that many species, but you have to link them to the host tree to conclude what they are.”

Update:
(01/11/2007) bug images on WTB
Dear Bugman,
I enjoyed visiting your site. It really doesn’t compete with BugGuide.net, since you have posted lots of foreign insects that they bar from that site. For example, you have some really nice photos of the primitive treehopper Aetalion (which is tropical). I thought you might like to know about the following:
(4) The “woolly aphid” is actually an insect infested by a fungus, that has sent out long fungal filaments.
Thanks for helping to spread an interest in Homoptera. We need to encourage the amateur.
Andy Hamilton

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Identify this bug please and thankyou.
Hello:
I have come across several of these bugs in my backyard today, that I have not seen before and I am curious to what they are. They are very beautiful and only about 3/8" to 1/2" long. They fly. They have yellowundersides, legs and head with 2 pink spots on top of their head. The wings are a deep pink with lighter bluish pink stripes. They have a black stripe going from one side of the head all the way around to the other side of the head, thinning out around the mouth area. Sorry, that I couldn’t get better photos, only have a video camera and it cannot take closer shots. Looking forward to hearing back from you soon.

I got a much closer look at these bugs and they are a deep fushia pink with lighter blue stripes on the wings. Sorry about that. I had to use the zoom on my camera and the defination is not very fine. On the back view of the bug the lighter pink stripes are actually blue. Thank you very much.
Darlene Johnson in Mt. Elgin, Ontario, Canada

Hi Darlene,
This is one of the Leafhoppers in the Family Cicadellidae. It looks to be the Red Banded Leafhopper, Graphocephala coccinea. Though beautiful, they can be destructive if numerous since they are sucking insects that feed on the sap of plants. They can also spread viruses from plant to plant.

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2 pictures for you
Neat website! I take macro photos (mostly of spiders and insects) here in Denver, Colorado and have a little bug that is ubiquitous in our yard. Every step I take in the lawn, generates hundreds of these little jumping bugs. The blue background on the first photo is a standard pair of blue jeans, so the weave should give a sense of scale. I tried to find out what it was, but came up short. Do you know what it is?
Thanks,
Rachel Drummond

Hi Rachel,
This is some species of immature Leafhopper in the Family Cicadellidae. They suck the juices from plants.

Update: (01/11/2007) bug images on WTB
Dear Bugman,
I enjoyed visiting your site. It really doesn’t compete with BugGuide.net, since you have posted lots of foreign insects that they bar from that site. For example, you have some really nice photos of the primitive treehopper Aetalion (which is tropical). I thought you might like to know about the following:
(5) The “leafhopper nymph” is actually a short-winged (brachypterous) leafhopper, Doratura stylata that is common on lawns. It has been introduced to North America from Europe.
Thanks for helping to spread an interest in Homoptera. We need to encourage the amateur.
Andy Hamilton

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Bug on my night blooming jasmin
Hi there,
I came across your site, and being a novice gardener, thought I would inquire as to whether or not you could identify this bug. They are propagating on my night blooming jasmine. I live in Southern California. Thanks!
Michele

Hi Michele,
You have nymphs from some species of Treehopper. They are destructive.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Whats this bug?
Bugman,
The leaves of my Norway Maple are filled with these. A friend tells me they are Mealy Bugs but they are unlike any Mealy Bug I have ever seen or have been able to Identify. The white mass is approx. 1/4 – 3/8 inches long and has what appears to b a brown scale like "cap" at one end. Any help is greatly appreciated.
Alan

Hi Alan,
You have a type of Cottony Scale insect from the genus Pulvinaria whose members are characterized by a naked adult female (the scale) who excretes a large cottony egg-sac beneath or behind her body. The Maple-Leaf Pulvinaria, Pulvinaria acericola is found on maple leaves which your photo beautifully illustrates. You might want to try to control the outbreak by checking with a local nursery.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

what is this??
i just noticed several of these on my rose bush, what the heck is it…it looks like an egg over-easy

You have Rose Scale, Aulacaspis rosae. According to Compton: “This species infests the stems of roses, blackberry, raspberry, dewberry, and some other plants. The infested stems often become densely coated with the scales. The scale of the female is circular, snowy white, with the exuviae light yellow and upon one side.” Your photo shows a solitary female. Get rid of her before she reproduces and infests your bushes.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination