Currently viewing the category: "Aphids, Scale Insects, Leafhoppers, and Tree Hoppers"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Bug with troll hair
Geographic location of the bug:  Gauteng, south africa
Date: 01/02/2019
Time: 01:34 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Please help ID this bug
How you want your letter signed:  Jacques B

Planthopper Nymph

Dear Jacques,
This is a Planthopper Nymph, a group of insects in the superfamily Fulgoroidea.  We have a similar image on our site of an unidentified Planthopper nymph, and now that we have this new request, we will renew our effort to identify the species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Doesn’t look like a carpet bug, but that’s where they were found!
Geographic location of the bug:  Manchester, UK
Date: 12/18/2018
Your letter to the bugman:  Can anyone I identify this little fella, found many of them in the carpet but they don’t appear to look like any imaged of carpet bugs I found on:  Anthony

Giant Conifer Aphid

Dear Anthony,
While we suspect the answer is “yes” we would like to confirm that you had a live Christmas tree in the house.  This is a Giant Conifer Aphid, and folks with live trees are often quite surprised to learn their tree was infested with Aphids that begin leaving the tree when it begins to dry out.  These Giant Conifer Aphids are a nuisance inside the home, but they will not damage your home or its furnishings, unless you have other live coniferous houseplants.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  White enigma
Geographic location of the bug:  Johannesburg, South Africa
Date: 12/24/2018
Time: 11:16 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi WTB
Please tell me what big this is. Found on my orchid in big groups. They’re quote small and seem hairy.
How you want your letter signed:  Simone

Mealybug

Dear Simone,
This looks like a Mealybug to us, a common pest on houseplants as well as cultivated plants in the garden.  Mealybugs feed by sucking fluids from plants, and if infestations are in large numbers, their feeding could conceivably weaken the plant.

Thank you so much, Daniel 🙂
So interesting to finally know what they are.
Merry Christmas/ Happy holidays
Simone
You are most welcome Simone, and Happy Holidays to you as well.
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Identify cicada
Geographic location of the bug:  Boyaca, Colombia
Date: 12/07/2018
Time: 08:47 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Help to identify this very very little buzzard,This buzzer was on a calla lily
How you want your letter signed:  Nicolas

Leafhopper

Dear Nicolas,
This is not a Cicada.  It is a Leafhopper or related insect in the suborder Auchenorrhyncha that includes Cicadas, hence the resemblance.  Though we could not find an exact visual match to your Leafhopper, it is similar to this individual on FlickR.

Leafhopper

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Crazy cool bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Kenmore, WA
Date: 11/09/2018
Time: 07:29 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Seen under a chestnut tree in Sep 2016. Saw two them, they were docile and slow.
How you want your letter signed:  Season

Oak Tree Hopper Nymph

Dear Season,
This is an immature Oak Tree Hopper and we are intrigued that you found it under a chestnut tree.  According to BugGuide:  “Fairly common on deciduous and evergreen oaks,
Quercus spp.”  According to the University of Florida IFAS Extension pdf on the species:  “Essig (1958) reported that he collected a freshly hatched colony from a cultivated chestnut tree (presumably in California).”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Small, Green, Clear wings, kind of Frog head
Geographic location of the bug:  La Manzanilla, Jalisco, Mexico
Date: 10/16/2018
Time: 10:47 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Have no idea what this is. Our cat seemed interested in it…..on our curtain this afternoon. Quite small.
How you want your letter signed:  Dave W.

Planthopper

I posted it on our local message board in La Manzanilla, Jalisco, Mexico. Someone found what it was:
Rhynchomitra microrhina
Thanks,
Dave W.
Dear Dave,
Thanks much for getting back to us with the information you found.  According to BugGuide
Rhynchomitra microrhina is a Dictyopharid Planthopper in the family Dictyopharidae.
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination