Currently viewing the category: "Aphids, Scale Insects, Leafhoppers, and Tree Hoppers"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination
Subject:  What’s that bug?
Location:  Los Angeles, CA
Thursday, September 21, 2017 6:42 PM
Found it on my cannabis plant.
It’s sticks to a surface very well and is not easy to detach
az-j

Scale Insect

Dear az-j,
Though we have not had any luck locating any images that look exactly like the creature you submitted, we can’t imagine it is anything but a Scale Insect.  Beyond the Human Eye has some nice Scale Insect images.
Continued searching might have resulted in an identification.  Thankfully your situation has not escalated to this stage pictured on BugGuide of Chinese Wax Scale.  According to BugGuide the Chinese Wax Scale is  “Non native. Introduced from Asia.”

Scale Insect

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What’s this pretty bug?
Geographic location of the bug:  Allentown PA
Date: 09/10/2017
Time: 10:35 AM EDT
I saw this beetle perched on a car bumper in a parking lot. As I got close to take the picture, the insect departed the number with an amazing vertical velocity! It’s leg joints look almost machine like. Is it a drone – lol? Appreciate your help identifying it!
How you want your letter signed:  Tom M

Spotted Lanternfly

Dear Tom,
This is an Invasive Exotic Spotted Lanternfly, a species recently introduced to North America from Asia.  At this time, its spread has only been reported from Pennsylvania.  According to BugGuide:  “SIGHTING REPORTS WANTED: Experts are working to delimit the current population and find new infestations of this species. Please report sightings on the Pennsylvania Dept. of Agriculture website.  earliest NA record: PA 2014.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  unidentified bug
Geographic location of the bug:  SE Penna, deciduous woods
Date: 09/05/2017
Time: 05:01 PM EDT
saw this guy on a deck at a house in the woods, mid-day
How you want your letter signed:  tony ryan

Spotted Lanternfly

Dear Tony,
The Spotted Lanternfly is an invasive exotic species from Asia that has become established in Pennsylvania.  The bright red, spotted nymphs are quite distinctive.  According to BugGuide:  “SIGHTING REPORTS WANTED: Experts are working to delimit the current population and find new infestations of this species. Please report sightings on the Pennsylvania Dept. of Agriculture website.  earliest NA record: PA 2014.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Help identifying this
Geographic location of the bug:  Blawnox, PA
Date: 09/04/2017
Time: 06:16 PM EDT
These guys were not moving until I disturbed them. Then the all came to life and started moving. Thank you in advance for your help toward this matter.
How you want your letter signed:
Robert Sroufe

Possibly Beech Blight Aphids

Dear Robert,
These are immature Hemipterans,  Do you know what plant they were feeding upon?  Could it have been a beech tree?  They look like Beech Blight Aphids,
Grylloprociphilus imbricator, pictured on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “They form large colonies of individuals covered with wax coating and wax feathered secretions. Fourth instar nymphs are slender, long legged and active” and “They, especially the fourth instar nymphs, fight predators by stinging them.”  There might be other similar looking species, but it would really help to know the food plant for your critters.

Possibly Beech Blight Aphids

Possibly Beech Blight Aphid

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Please identify this bug
Location: Irvine, CA
August 22, 2017 1:33 pm
This bug is hanging out on my milkweed plant. Please help me identify it so I can get rid of it.
Thank you!
Signature: Marta Rosener

Large Milkweed Bug and Oleander Aphids

Dear Marta,
The large insect in your image is a Large Milkweed Bug, and though they suck juices from plants, they feed mainly on the seeds and seed pods which will reduce the number of viable seeds produced by the plant, but it will not harm the plant.  The tiny, yellow Oleander Aphids are another story and they are injurious to the young shoots of your milkweed plants, but it also appears that the Large Milkweed Bug might be feeding on the Aphids.  According to BugGuide:  “In the course of feeding these bugs accumulate toxins from the milkweed, which can potentially sicken any predators foolish enough to ignore the bright colors which warn of their toxicity.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: found this on top of my BBQ cover
Location: South San Francisco, California
August 19, 2017 12:01 am
He or she stood out like a sore thumb bright green on a Blacktop then it got blown over into the grass and I proceeded to try and take its picture. I had never seen anything like this only on TV I do a lot of gardening and notice on occasion on bug but this one really caught my eye I don’t know what it is I try to look it up can’t seem to find it I would say it was about between a quarter and a half inch long and the same in the Height
Signature: Terri E

Torpedo Bug

Dear Terri,
Commonly called a Torpedo Bug, this Flatid Planthopper goes by the scientific name
Siphanta acuta.  According to BugGuide:  “native to Australia, adventive elsewhere (New Zealand, Hawaii, S. Africa); established in CA” which makes it an Invasive Exotic Species.  It is described on BugGuide as being “green and triangular, with pink eyes and pointed head; forewings have many veins and cross veins, mimicking a leaf, and cover the body like the sides of a sloping roof when the insect is at rest.”

Torpedo Bug

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination