Currently viewing the category: "Aphids, Scale Insects, Leafhoppers, and Tree Hoppers"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Bugs that like the corners of walls and ceilings
Location: Myrtle Beach, SC
February 9, 2012 12:46 am
Howdy!
This thing is tiny — between 1/16th to 1/8th of an inch. located inside our house in South Carolina in Februrary. They tend to like the corners of the walls. Thank you for your help.
Signature: db

Mite, probably

Dear db,
We believe this is probably some species of Mite and we hope an acarologist might be able to provide more specific information.

Correction:  April 21, 2012
We just received a comment indicating this is more likely an Aphid

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Two insects in the house
Location: New Jersey
February 1, 2012 9:40 pm
We have these two separate small insects in our house. Neither bites. The small winged one doesn’t appear to fly. The small ticklike one (it’s not a tick) seems to congregate around our baseboard heat. I’ve tried all the websites but haven’t come up with a name.
Thanks in advance for any info…
Signature: Elaine

Aphid

Hi Elaine,
Both of your insects are Aphids, and they are most likely the same species.  The winged individual is a sexually mature adult.  Immature aphids and females that reproduce by giving live birth to clones without the need for a mate are generally wingless.  Aphids are common pests on a wide variety of plants, including rose bushes, and you should be able to find much online information.  We often hear of Aphids being brought indoors on Christmas trees, and that could be the source of your current sightings.  You may have also brought Aphids in on plants that were brought indoors to avoid cold weather or even on fresh flowers from the florist or on fresh produce.  Aphids will not harm your home.

Aphid

Thanks so much for your quick response.  This answers alot of our questions!!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

bolivia bug
Location: Rurrenabaque, Bolivia
January 29, 2012 10:25 pm
This bug is from Rurrenabaque, Bolivia can you identify it please
Signature: M Schwartz

Fulgorid PLanthopper

Dear M Schwartz,
We identified your Fulgorid Planthopper as the Amazon Roostertail,
Lystra lanata, on FlickR.  The common name is listed as the Red Dotted Planthopper on Animal World where it states:  “These interesting insects are members of the hemiptera or true bugs. They use their proboscis to penetrate their host plant/tree on which they are usually found to drink the sugary rich phloem. They excrete honeydew which is a sugary liquid stripped of the nutrients needed by the fulgorid but still of interest to other insects, chiefly ants. So, fulgorids (and many other hemipterans) can be found attended by many different species of ants which will actually cultivate, farm and defend their hosts. The white tails are actually made of wax. This strategy is possibly a ploy to fool birds and other predators who might mistake the extremely visible tails for the head. Found during a night hike in Iwokrama rainforest reserve, Guyana”.

Hello Daniel
Thank you very much for such prompt and helpful assistance!
Chuck McClaugherty

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Unknown Cost Rican Insect
Location: Puerto Viejo de Sarapiqui, Costa Rica
January 27, 2012 2:37 pm
Greetings
These two insects were observed on the bark of a huge tree (Terminalia) in the arboretum at LaSelva Biological station in the lowland rain forests of northeastern Costa Rica in late May 2006. They remained there most of one day but were gone (eaten, flew away?) the next morning. About 3 cm long as I recall
Signature: Chuck McClaugherty

Fulgorid Planthopper

Hi Chuck,
Two years ago, entomologist Piotr Naskrecki helped us identify this Fulgorid Planthopper as
Phrictus quinquepartitus.  There is a lovely drawing of it on FlickR.  Costa Rican tour company Taraba Tours calls it the Dragon Headed Bug. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Thames, North Island, New Zealand
January 21, 2012 1:17 am
Hi. I’ve been trying to search for images of an insect that is increasing in numbers in my vege garden, but so far I’ve been unable to identify it. Perhaps you could help, or point me to a place where I can browse through photos of insects. I think it is a moth, judging from the way it flies. I live in Thames, New Zealand. Thank you very much. (2 photos attached)
Signature: Dave Clingman

Passion Vine Hopper

Hi Dave,
Though it is moth-like, this insect is actually a Planthopper, probably a Passion Vine Hopper,
Scolypopa australis, which we identified on the Brisbane Insect Websitewhere it states:  “They are common in Brisbane bushes and gardens. When disturbed, they jumped away with a loud ‘click’ sound and disappeared in the air.  Many of them can be found resting on the same plant during early summer. They are consider as pest on passion vine and kiwifruit. It seems that besides those vine plants, they feed on many other plants as well.”  The smaller creatures in your second photo might be immature Passion Vine Hoppers.

Passion Vine Hopper

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

ID needed for derbidae family hopper
Location: Lake Eacham, tablelands, far north qld, australia
January 9, 2012 10:07 pm
Taken near Lake Eacham, far north queensland. rainforest over xmas hols.
I have taken similar ones before (Lydda elongata (Fabricius)i think) but this has a large nose !
thanks in advance
Signature: Andy

Derbid Planthopper

Dear Andy,
Your Derbid Planthopper images are gorgeous and quite detailed.  We are posting this as an unidentified insect, and we hope to be able to eventually provide you with a genus or species identification. 

Derbid Planthopper

The closeup image is especially nice.

Derbid Planthopper

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination