Currently viewing the category: "Aphids, Scale Insects, Leafhoppers, and Tree Hoppers"
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Subject: China bug
Location: Shanhaiguan, China
October 27, 2016 7:45 am
We saw several of these bugs in Hebei province (east of Beijing, on the coast) in early September. The body was a real eye opening red! Any ideas of species?
Signature: Su

White Cicada

White Cicada

Dear Su,
Though it is commonly called a White Cicada,
 Lycorma delicatula is actually a Fulgorid Leafhopper.  Your images are of winged adults.  We have more images in our archive of the brightly colored nymphs.

White Cicada

White Cicada

THANK YOU!  That was really helpful.  I think the pictures of the nymphs are amazing.
Su

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Green mini ? fly
Location: Nayarit, Mexico
September 30, 2016 6:31 pm
I’m in the west coast tropics of Mexico. You published my picture of a tailless whip scorpion a few years back. I’m amazed by the diversity of new bugs that show up after each rainstorm down here.
Every time I show a new bug to a local friend, he just shrugs his shoulders (if he’s not terrified by the bug :-)) and says nueva lluvia nuevo animal!
Anyway, this one is the only example I have ever seen, so I hope you can let me know what it is.
Thanks!
Signature: Steve in the tropics of Nayarit.

Free-Living Hemipteran: Planthopper or Other???

Free-Living Hemipteran: Planthopper or Other???

Dear Steve,
This is a Free-Living Hemipteran from the suborder Auchenorrhyncha, a group that includes Cicadas, Leafhopper, Treehoppers and Planthoppers.  Though it resembles a small Cicada, we believe it is a Planthopper in the superfamily Fulgoroidea.  We will continue to research its identity.

Free-Living Hemipteran

Free-Living Hemipteran

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: rhinmotherous?
Location: Ontario, Canada
September 27, 2016 7:24 pm
A friend in Ontario happened across this little guy during a walk. He’s so nifty I just have to know what he is!
Signature: Dee

Treehopper

Treehopper

Dear Dee,
This is a thorn-mimic Treehopper in the family Membracidae.  We were not able to locate an exact visual match on BugGuide, but we will get back to researching this again later in the day.  Meanwhile, perhaps our readership will be able to assist with this identification.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Weed brownies g
Location: Ottawa ontario
August 27, 2016 10:57 am
I am not sure what these are but they are all over the weeds in my back yard. Is it something dangerous?
Signature: Sarah Knox

Aphids

Aphids

Dear Sarah,
These are Aphids, but we are not certain of the species.  According to BugGuide:  “Aphids suck juices from plants and may be quite damaging. Some are restricted to a single plant species or group of related plants. Others may alternate between two entirely unrelated host plants as a necessary part of their life cycle” and “Aphids may be identified by two tubelike projections on the posterior, called cornicles or siphunculi. These appear to function as a means of chemical defense, emitting pheromones to alert other aphids about a predator nearby. They also offer mechanical protection, as the fluid emitted can gum up the mouthparts of the predators. Species may sometimes be identified by the host plant, but several aphid spp. may infest the same host.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What bug is this?
Location: Southern California
August 9, 2016 2:41 pm
Found this bug on me while laying in bed. What is it?
Signature: Mathew

Glassy Winged Sharpshooter

Glassy Winged Sharpshooter

Dear Mathew,
The Glassy Winged Sharpshooter is a recently introduced insect to Southern California.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What type of moth is this?
Location: Daejeon, South Korea
August 9, 2016 12:29 pm
Hello. I have included a picture of a moth that I am trying to identify. The moth is found is South Korea. The one in the picture was near a river and there were hundreds of them in that area. I have seen them mostly in the evening, but I assume they are also active at night.
I hope you can tell me this little guys name.
Thank you.
Signature: John Erskin

Free Living Hemipteran

Ricaniid Planthopper

Dear John,
This is not a Moth.  It is a Free Living Hemipteran in the suborder Auchenorrhyncha, a group that includes Cicadas, Leafhoppers, Planthoppers and Treehoppers.  Other than recognizing its suborder, we have not had any luck with a more specific identification at this time.

Update:  August 11, 2016
Thanks to a pair of comments from our awesome contributor, Cesar Crash, who runs Insetologia in Brazil, directing us first to a matching image on FlickR identified as a Ricaniid Planthopper from the family Ricaniidae,
Ricania shantungensis, and then to a scholarly article on Science Alert on the reclassification of the genus as Pochazia, we suddenly realize we are way over our head in writing about this particular insect.  With that said, we will just quote the first paragraph from Science Alert:  “Two species of the genus Pochazia, P. albomaculata and P. shantungensis, are redescribed and illustrated from Korea. Among them, the exotic species P. shantungensis, assumed to be invaded from China recently, is known for the first time in Korea. A sudden outbreak of the latter is observed in the western part of Korean peninsula which is injurious to various fruit plants, many other trees and wild herbs. Hitherto unknown male genitalic characters of the two species are given and keys to genera of the Ricaniidae and species of Pochazia from Korea are provided.”   The New South Wales Government has a nice page on the family Ricaniidae, an Old World Family of Planthoppers that will hopefully not spread with globalization as members of the Free Living Hemipteran suborder Auchenorrhyncha, and indeed Hemipterans in general, are among the most problematic invasive species because of the agricultural impact their introduction has on crops.    

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination