Currently viewing the category: "Aphids, Scale Insects, Leafhoppers, and Tree Hoppers"
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Some kind of Cicada?
Location: Carlingford (western sydney), Australia
March 18, 2012 8:49 pm
While out photographing some bugs in my backyard, i stumbled onto this guy sitting on one of my window sills, i have no idea what he is. Looks a little bit like a cicada, but quite a bit smaller (probably 1/3 the size?). I didnt get many photos of him before he jumped, and i didnt see where he went after that.
Signature: Paul J R

Treehopper

Dear Paul,
The reason this Leafhopper reminds you of a Cicada is that they are in the same insect order, Hemiptera.  We have not been able to find a matching image for your individual, however, it reminds us of the Gum Tree Hoppers in the subfamily Eurymelinae that are pictured on the Brisbane Insect website.

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Please Identify
Location: San Diego, CA
March 2, 2012 2:01 pm
Hello bugman. Will you kindly tell me what to call this little thing? He is here in San Diego, CA on my butterfly bush. He is very small but very brightly colored. His little yellow legs are so very pretty.
Signature: Thank you, Teddi

Blue-Green Sharpshooter

Dear Teddi,
Your insect is one of the Leafhoppers known as Sharpshooters.  We have identified your individual as a Blue-Green Sharpshooter,
Hordnia atropunctata, thanks to the comprehensive archive on BugGuide which states:  “vector of Pierce’s disease of grape in coastal CA.”  Because Leafhoppers have sucking mouthparts, they are capable of spreading plant viruses from plant to plant. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Strange Insect
Location: Singapore
March 4, 2012 4:12 am
Hello there,
i was wondering if you could help me identify this cute little insect, it almost looked like a moth, but the wings were placed oddly. the whole insect was a light purple blue, sorry if the photo is a bad.
Signature: Cassia

Planthopper

Hi Cassia,
This is a Planthopper, and we did find several matching photos online, including this image on the Beauty of Fauna and Flora in Nature website, but we were unable to identify the species.  We suspect it is in the family Flatidae.

thank you so much for the reply!
I have done some research on them, but I am still wondering if there is a difference between planthoppers and leafhoppers?
Cassia

They are in the same Hemipteran suborder Auchenorrhyncha, the Free Living Hemipterans, but they are in different superfamilies.  See BugGuide for a taxonomic breakdown.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

small orange bug
Location: Southern California
February 22, 2012 11:41 am
This guy came off a citrus tree in Southern California and is about 1mm in length. Other specimens from the same tree were greenish brown in color covered with a soot much like a mealy bug. I have this one under a microscope with shots top and bottom.
Signature: R. Japp

Unknown Citrus Bug

Dear R. Japp,
While we do not at this time know what this orange bug is that you found on your citrus tree, we don’t believe it to be a beneficial insect.  We will take a bit more time to research this identification.

Unknown Citrus Bug

Karl poses a possible identification
Hi Daniel and R. Japp:
I am treading into unfamiliar territory here, but to me this looks a lot like an early instar Cottony Cushion Scale (Icerya purchasi). If that is the correct identification, it is considered a serious pest of citrus crops so there is a fair amount of information available on the internet. For example, you could check out this publication from the University of Arizona College of Agriculture, or this one from the University of California Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources. Here is a link to another set of photos that look quite similar. Although the topside colors are a little darker in this set, the black legs and antennae are apparently a key diagnostic feature for the species. The origin of this insect seems uncertain, possibly Australia, but it has now become global, living wherever citrus crops are grown. Regards. Karl

 

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Bugs that like the corners of walls and ceilings
Location: Myrtle Beach, SC
February 9, 2012 12:46 am
Howdy!
This thing is tiny — between 1/16th to 1/8th of an inch. located inside our house in South Carolina in Februrary. They tend to like the corners of the walls. Thank you for your help.
Signature: db

Mite, probably

Dear db,
We believe this is probably some species of Mite and we hope an acarologist might be able to provide more specific information.

Correction:  April 21, 2012
We just received a comment indicating this is more likely an Aphid

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Two insects in the house
Location: New Jersey
February 1, 2012 9:40 pm
We have these two separate small insects in our house. Neither bites. The small winged one doesn’t appear to fly. The small ticklike one (it’s not a tick) seems to congregate around our baseboard heat. I’ve tried all the websites but haven’t come up with a name.
Thanks in advance for any info…
Signature: Elaine

Aphid

Hi Elaine,
Both of your insects are Aphids, and they are most likely the same species.  The winged individual is a sexually mature adult.  Immature aphids and females that reproduce by giving live birth to clones without the need for a mate are generally wingless.  Aphids are common pests on a wide variety of plants, including rose bushes, and you should be able to find much online information.  We often hear of Aphids being brought indoors on Christmas trees, and that could be the source of your current sightings.  You may have also brought Aphids in on plants that were brought indoors to avoid cold weather or even on fresh flowers from the florist or on fresh produce.  Aphids will not harm your home.

Aphid

Thanks so much for your quick response.  This answers alot of our questions!!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination