Currently viewing the category: "Aphids, Scale Insects, Leafhoppers, and Tree Hoppers"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Black bugs with white spots on pepper plants
Geographic location of the bug:  Reading, PA
Date: 06/15/2018
Your letter to the bugman:  I am finding these bugs all over my tomato and pepper plants. They are also all over the front of my house. I can’t seem to find them online. Could you identify them
How you want your letter signed:  Ron Zeiber

Spotted Lanternfly Nymphs

Dear Ron,
The moment we read your subject line, we surmised you are being troubled by immature Spotted Lanternflies,
Lycorma delicatula, and your image proved us correct.  The Spotted Lanternfly is an Invasive Exotic species first reported in North America in 2014.  According to BugGuide:  “Native to China, India, Japan and Vietnam; invasive in Korea and in our area(1). Currently (2018) known from 6 counties in PA; also found in DE, NY, VA.”  According to the Government of Canada website:  “The spotted lanternfly (Lycorma delicatula, Hemiptera: Fulgoridae) is an impressive and colourful insect native to Asia, and has been recognised as a potential threat to the grape, fruit tree and forestry industries in Canada. It was first detected in North America in Pennsylvania in September 2014. As it is not known to exist in Canada, spotted lanternfly was added to the regulated pest list in 2018 in an effort to prevent the introduction from infested areas. Early detection activities would make managing the pest easier due to the discovery of this insect in the United States and the volume of articles potentially carrying the insect arriving from Asia. It can be distinguished from all other native and naturalized insects (such as planthoppers, moths) in Canada by its unique colouration. “

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Elm scale?
Geographic location of the bug:  Brighton, UK
Date: 06/13/2018
Time: 03:08 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  What is this bug?!
Is it a bug in cocoon form?
How you want your letter signed:  BugGirl

Scale Insects

Dear BugGirl,
These are definitely Scale Insects, and we suspect you questioned if they are Elm Scale because they were found on an elm tree.  There is an image of Horse Chestnut Scales, Pulvinaria regalis, on the Bedfordshire Natural History Society site that looks very similar and this information is provided:  “This species probably originates in Asia, but has become widespread in central and northwest Europe since the 1960s. It is broadly polyphagous on woody plants. It is the most common coccid in urban areas throughout most of Britain but also occurs at low densities in rural areas. In Beds it has been found in Bedford, Bigglesworth, Caddington, Dunstable, Flitwick, Leighton Buzzard, Luton, Luton Hoo, Sandy, Swiss Cottage and Whipsnade; on bay laurel, elm, ivy, horse chestnut, lime, maple and sycamore.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Possible Fairy or Yucca Moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Nature Trail in SE New Mexico
Date: 05/22/2018
Time: 11:35 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  We found this guy last weekend while walking on a nature trail in SE New Mexico.  We almost missed him.  He is so tiny.  We weren’t even sure it was an insect until we took a closer look.  He was so small, we couldn’t get the camera to focus on it without putting a hand behind it.  The next day I found two on the same bush, or at least one in the same area.  They didn’t move the entire time we examined them.
We looked on line, and the closest match we could find was fairy moths or yucca moths.  However, we could not see any antenna on the guys we found.  The photos on the Bug Guide site all seemed to have noticeable antenna.  There are yucca and ocotillo on the nature trail, but none of them are in bloom, yet.
Thanks for all you do to educate us.
How you want your letter signed:  Curious

Flatid Planthopper

Dear Curious,
We do not believe these are moths.  In our opinion, they look like Flatid Planthopper, possibly 
Flatormenis saucia which is pictured on BugGuide and is reported from New Mexico, or possibly a different species.  Flatid Planthoppers are Free-Living Hemipterans that feed by sucking fluids from plants with their piercing mouthparts.

Flatid Planthopper

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  On my woody plant
Geographic location of the bug:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
Date: 05/13/2018
Time: 11:54 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  What’s That Bug?
How you want your letter signed:  Max Yield

Aphid

Dear Max Yield,
This is an Aphid that feeds by piercing the soft membranes of new shoots of plants and sucking the fluids.  Aphids will quickly multiply.  Ants have a symbiotic relationship with Aphids, caring for them and moving them to new plants, spreading the infestations.  Ants benefit by feeding off the honeydew excreted by Aphids and Aphids benefit from the protection.  An Aphid infestation will compromise the health of your plant and tender shoots will sometimes wither when there are large numbers of Aphids. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this cool looking guy
Geographic location of the bug:  North Florida
Date: 04/01/2018
Time: 05:08 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Just trying to identify this little guy
How you want your letter signed:  Daniel Hopper

Oak Treehopper

Dear Daniel,
This is an Oak Treehopper.  According to BugGuide:  “Does almost no damage to the host trees—leaves only a few twig scars from oviposition.  There are four named varieties and several other color variations, and some individuals lack the pronotal horn.” 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unknown bug, thornbug?
Geographic location of the bug:  Oceanside, CA
Date: 03/13/2018
Time: 11:09 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I would love to know the ID of this tiny alien-looking bug.  I  found thousands of these bugs on a bush in my yard in June of last year.  They are less than a 1/4 inch long.
How you want your letter signed:  Heidi G

Immature Keel-Backed Treehoppers

Dear Heidi,
Though you did not specify what type of bush in your yard you found these immature Keel-Backed Treehoppers living upon, we are speculating they were feeding by sucking the fluids from a tomato plant, pepper plant or some other member of the family Solanaceae.  Here is a BugGuide image for comparison.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination