Currently viewing the category: "Aphids, Scale Insects, Leafhoppers, and Tree Hoppers"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What in the world…
Geographic location of the bug:  Durban, South Africa
Date: 03/06/2019
Time: 10:58 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I was strolling through my garden when I came across these weird bugs. What are they and what are they doing? They are freaky, stuck together and bubbling!!
How you want your letter signed:  Ryan

Aggregation of unknown Hemipterans

Dear Ryan,
We have not had any luck matching your images to any images on line in our initial search, so we are posting your request as Unidentified.  We are quite certain these are members of the insect order Hemiptera, the group that includes True Bugs, Cicadas and Leafhoppers.  We will continue to research this matter and perhaps one of our readers will have some free time to investigate.

Update:  Cesar Crash from Insetologia found this Spittlebug posting in our archives that looks like the same species.  North American Spittlebugs do not tend to aggregate in such large numbers, though it is frequently possible to find several individuals hiding in the “spittle.”

Hemipteran Nymphs

Facebook Comment from Amy
Spittlebugs! (Ptyelus grossus?)

Subject:  What in the world….follow up
Geographic location of the bug:  Durban, South Africa
Date: 03/08/2019
Time: 02:40 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi again.
Thanks for trying to identify that mass of bugs:”Aggregation of unknown Hemipterans”. I have taken a few more pictures of whats left of them, so it might be clearer on what they are. Think they are some sort of leaf hopper.
How you want your letter signed:  Ryan

Spittlebugs

Hi Ryan,
Thanks for sending additional images that include the winged adult Spittlebug,
Ptyelus grossus.  According to the Flora of Zimbabwe:  “Larvae and nymphs of this species are highly gregarious. While feeding on the sap of certain tree species they excrete a foamy liquid that forms protective nests around them. Numbers of these nymphs can by so high in a single tree that the excessive excretions can drip onto the soil below the tree and may form wet patches or even small puddles.  Widespread in tropical and Southern Africa.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Bug Identification
Geographic location of the bug:  Unknown
Date: 01/25/2019
Time: 02:34 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear Sir,
I have many bugs in resin, that I would like to be identified. If this is possible that would be great. The bugs vary from scorpions to beetles, from flies to crickets. I do have more bugs to identify, however only three images could be attached, if you could contact me and then I will be able to attach the other images. If more images are required please contact me. Thank you very much.
How you want your letter signed:  Best Regards, George.

Spotted Lanternfly in Lucite

Dear George,
In most cases, we have an ethical opposition to the trade in insects preserved in lucite, but we are especially intrigued by one of your images that appears to be a Spotted Lanternfly,
Lycorma delicatula, an invasive, exotic species that was recently accidentally introduced to Pennsylvania about five years ago, and has since become a significant concern as a threat to the agriculture industry as well as to home gardeners.  We have no ethical opposition to capturing invasive species and embedding them in lucite to sell as curios to raise money to help fight the spread of this and other non-native species that become established, often threatening native species.

Dear Mr.Marlos,
Thank you for the reply, and the help in identifying an insect. I was also just wondering why are you opposed to this, because I do like keeping insects and animals, I have a tortoise and I have owned frogs and millipedes, and I just want to know the reasons. Thanks so much for your reply.
Best Regards, George.
George Evans
Dear George,
We have a similar reaction on a much greater scale when we see big game hunters with their trophies.  We would prefer to see living beasts than to see antelope heads mounted on walls or tiger skin rugs in front of fireplaces.  Collectors will spend high sums for rare species, which leads to poaching.  There is a book called Winged Obsession about butterfly smuggling.  Most cheap trinkets of insects embedded in lucite do not fall into the endangered species category, but our issues stem more from people who collect because of the desire to own pretty things to display rather than to collect specimens for scientific research.
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Little white bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Cartago, Costa Rica
Date: 01/15/2019
Time: 11:27 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Its a little white spiky bug, with only 3mm long.  I found it under my tree palm at the front garden.
How you want your letter signed:  jotace photo

Mealybug

Dear jotace photo,
This sure looks to us like a Mealybug or some other plant-parasitic Hemipteran in the suborder Sternorrhyncha, and here is a BugGuide image that is quite similar.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Treehopper
Geographic location of the bug:  Brits, South Africa
Date: 01/13/2019
Time: 11:53 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi
My daughter spotted this treehopper. (that’s what we suspect it is) but can’t find any info on this specific type.
It was extremely warm the past couple weeks. 35’c daily.
How you want your letter signed:  Caity and dad

Planthopper Nymph

Dear Caity and dad,
Immature Hemipterans can be very difficult to identify to the species level, and sometimes genus and family levels are also difficult to verify conclusively.  Here is an image of a very similar looking Planthopper nymph also from South Africa.  Based on Wikipedia images, we suspect your individual is in the family Eurybrachidae.

Fantastic! Thanks for the reply! Spectacular site. Thanks
Werner
BTK Software

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Bug with troll hair
Geographic location of the bug:  Gauteng, south africa
Date: 01/02/2019
Time: 01:34 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Please help ID this bug
How you want your letter signed:  Jacques B

Planthopper Nymph

Dear Jacques,
This is a Planthopper Nymph, a group of insects in the superfamily Fulgoroidea.  We have a similar image on our site of an unidentified Planthopper nymph, and now that we have this new request, we will renew our effort to identify the species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Doesn’t look like a carpet bug, but that’s where they were found!
Geographic location of the bug:  Manchester, UK
Date: 12/18/2018
Your letter to the bugman:  Can anyone I identify this little fella, found many of them in the carpet but they don’t appear to look like any imaged of carpet bugs I found on:  Anthony

Giant Conifer Aphid

Dear Anthony,
While we suspect the answer is “yes” we would like to confirm that you had a live Christmas tree in the house.  This is a Giant Conifer Aphid, and folks with live trees are often quite surprised to learn their tree was infested with Aphids that begin leaving the tree when it begins to dry out.  These Giant Conifer Aphids are a nuisance inside the home, but they will not damage your home or its furnishings, unless you have other live coniferous houseplants.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination