Currently viewing the category: "Aphids, Scale Insects, Leafhoppers, and Tree Hoppers"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s that bug?
Location: Marlborough sounds
January 17, 2017 2:00 pm
Hi bug man hope your having a good day.
I have found a bug with a furry tail usually appearing on my wetsuit or wood outside at night.
Signature: Jamie

Immature Planthopper

Dear Jamie,
This is an immature Planthopper in the superfamily Fulgoroidea, but immature specimens can be very difficult to identify to the species level.  Images on the Brisbane Insect site look very similar.  According to TERRAIN:  “The nymphs are wingless and are informally known as fluffy bums. When sufficiently aroused they will hop off their plant ‘with a snap’.  Like all planthoppers they suck plant sap.”  We are amused by the common name Fluffy Bum and it is very descriptive for many nymphs in the superfamily.  According to Getty Images:  “the wax secreted from behind may serve to conceal this tiny creature from predators.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown Species
Location: Manila, Philippines
January 14, 2017 7:14 pm
Hello i just want to ask what kind of species is this. I just need it for my project in ecology and i hope you answer this question immediately. thank you and god bless
Signature: ecology

Possibly Mealybug

Dear ecology,
This may be the first time we have received an identification request from an entire scientific discipline as opposed to a request from an individual.  This appears to us like it might be a Hemipteran because of its similarity to the Giant Snowball Mealybug from Australia.  Based on Project Noah, Giant Scale Insects from the genus
Monophlebulus are found in the Philippines.  Your image is not distinct enough to be certain.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown Bug
Location: Gunung Leseur Nat’l Park, Sumatra, Indonesia
January 16, 2017 4:40 am
This is a picture of some bugs with what look like white “streamers” coming from their body. This is the only clear picture I have. They look like some sort of seed that has blown onto the tree, but they actually moved around the surface of the tree in random patterns. The white streamers obscured the body of the bug, so I could not see what was underneath the streamers.
I came across them while hiking in the jungle in Sumatra. The guide, who could not identify them, did not want me to pick them off the tree and examine them more closely, so I don’t know more about their body. After multiple trips, I only found them in one location on one tree.
Signature: Robert R.

Hemipterans

Dear Robert,
These insects are members of the order Hemiptera,  a group that includes True Bugs, Cicadas, Leafhoppers, Aphids and allies.  Many very similar looking immature Hemipterans secrete a waxy substance that is believe to be a protection against predators.  There are also some species of Fulgorid Leafhoppers that similarly secrete a waxy substance in their adult stages.  Unfortunately, we cannot provide any more conclusive identification at this time.

Hemipteran with waxy secretion

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What bugs are these?
Location: Cairns, QLD, Australia
December 3, 2016 7:11 am
Found these in my yard.
Signature: CE

Palm Planthopper Nymph

Palm Planthopper Nymph

Dear CE,
We are pretty confident this is a Planthopper nymph in the family Family Lophopidae, probably a Palm Planthopper nymph,
Magia subocellata, based on images posted to the Brisbane Insect site and FlickR.  We are postdating this submission to go live to our site at the end of the month while we are away for the holidays.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Aphids…Again
Location: Dead on the ground and in the Christmas Tree
December 2, 2016 12:09 pm
Dear Bugman,
You helped us identify the bugs on our Christmas Tree last year as aphids – I was very happy to learn they were aphids and not ticks or spiders, so thank you! However, even with close inspection before bringing it home, it seems our tree again this year has aphids. We’ve had the tree six days and so far we’ve seen a handful of dead ones on the ground under the tree, until this morning. I found a small puddle of sap on the floor so investigated and discovered a branch with a cluster of them just above the puddle. I cut the branch off and attempted to thoroughly inspect the tree. I didn’t find any, but they’re pretty hard to see with the naked eye – their color and size help them blend in well! My question: is the tree doomed? Are aphids a pack bug? If there’s a handful, is the tree bound to be infested and they just haven’t made their appearance yet? I’d rather drag the tree out now and not Christmas morning!
Thank you, again!
Signature: Buggin Out, Again

Giant Conifer Aphids

Giant Conifer Aphids

Dear Buggin Out, Again,
Each year we get at least one report of a Christmas Tree with Giant Conifer Aphids on it.  We suspect that most farmed Christmas trees have a good chance of supporting a population of Aphids.  Aphids are generally found in significant numbers rather than individually.  We are most amused that you asked if your tree is doomed.  The tree was doomed the minute the axe was taken to it, and one might even argue that since it likely came from a tree farm, it was doomed the minute it was planted.  Our advice to you is to chill and ignore the Aphids you have found and to just enjoy your tree until you normally remove it.  The Giant Conifer Aphids will not infest your houseplants, and they will not leave the tree unless they drop dead onto the floor.  You will need to vacuum tree needles anyways, so don’t stress.  Since we will be leaving the office for the holidays, we are postdating your submission to go live to our site at the end of the month. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: tiny blue and black bug
Location: Burlington, KY 41005
November 23, 2016 11:32 am
Hello,
This little guy landed on me outside earlier today. I’m in northern Kentucky, Burlington to be exact. It’s a chilly day out, temps are in the low 50’s and it was drizzling earlier. I can’t seem to find a bug similar to this on the Web, and am curious to know what it is.
Thank you!
Signature: Samantha

Woolly Aphid

Woolly Aphid

Dear Samantha,
As you can see by comparing your image to this BugGuide image, your insect is a Woolly Aphid in the family Eriosomatinae, but since many Woolly Aphids look quite similar, we cannot provide you with a genus nor species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination