Currently viewing the category: "Aphids, Scale Insects, Leafhoppers, and Tree Hoppers"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Termite?
Geographic location of the bug:  Anaheim California
Date: 04/01/2020
Time: 08:01 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I took this picture March 25, 2020 not sure what that bug is,
Hopefully someone can tell me.
How you want your letter signed:  Ken O

Mealybug

Dear Ken,
We are relatively certain this is a Mealybug based on this BugGuide image.  According to the University of Wisconsin Master Gardener Program:  “The citrus mealybug (
Planococcus citri) is the most common species found on plant foliage. It feeds on a wide variety of plants, and especially likes soft-stemmed and succulent plants such as coleus, fuchsia, croton, jade, poinsettia and cactus. In my greenhouse I also find them consistently on rosemary, citrus, and bird of paradise. ”  You did not indicate where you found it.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Found this little guy in the pool
Geographic location of the bug:  Namibia, Windhoek
Date: 02/19/2020
Time: 11:26 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I’m living in Namibia for 7 years now and I’m pretty attentive if it comes to insects. But I’ve never seen this guy before. The smell when threatened reminds me of Heteroptera. It is currently summer and rain season.
How you want your letter signed:  Kind Regards

Mottled Avocado Bug

This Planthopper belongs to the order Hemiptera which contains the True Bugs in the suborder Heteroptera and many members of the family, which includes Stink Bugs, produce a noticeable odor.  Earlier today we posted additional images of what we have identified as the Mottled Avocado Bug, Parapioxys jucundus

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Please help … I can’t find what insect this is
Geographic location of the bug:  South-Africa Gauteng
Date: 02/22/2020
Time: 08:10 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Please help.
I found this bug …
I don’t know if its a moth or butterfly or anything else.
It started to lay eggs in the Jar I put her in.
Green with white and black spots with a red body and a white tail were the eggs are coming out.
It walks backwards and sidewards.
How you want your letter signed:  K.Krugel

Mottled Avocado Bug

Dear K.Krugel,
This is neither a butterfly nor a moth.  It is a Planthopper.   We found it pictured but not identified on iStock Getty Photo.  We then located an image in our archives that we identified as the Mottled Avocado Bug,
Parapioxys jucundus.  Here is a FlickR image.  It is described in the Field Guide to Insects of South Africa as:  “a probable lichen-mimic, has a very broad head, and is vividly coloured, with emerald green fore wings with concentrations of white spots and blotches, overlaid with black spots.”

Mottled Avocado Bug

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unknown insect
Geographic location of the bug:  Ottawa Ontario Canada
Date: 02/06/2020
Time: 12:41 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Not sure if these are thrips or aphids? any help identifying and eradicating these would be appreciated. This is my third indoor crop over winter that has been infested over this winter so far 🙁
Thank you very much!
Dave
How you want your letter signed:  Thank you

Aphids on Cannabis

Dear Dave,
These appear to be Aphids, and they appear to be on a
Cannabis leaflet, so we are assuming you are growing Marijuana indoors.  This article on Canna Connection might have some helpful information for you as does Royal Queen Seeds.  Because female Aphids are able to give birth asexually, they do not require mating and populations of Aphids can increase quite rapidly.  Indoor growing has its own set of challenges, and keeping plants pest-free is often difficult.

Excellent! Thank you so much for the references.. I’ll do my best to eradicate these tiny pests.. you’ve been most helpful!
Take good care my friend!
Dave
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Bug I can’t identify
Geographic location of the bug:  Northern NJ
Date: 11/11/2019
Time: 01:32 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Saw these on a pin oak this morning
How you want your letter signed:  Ryan Moore

Giant Bark Aphids

Dear Ryan,
We quickly identified what we suspected were Giant Bark Aphids,
Longistigma caryae, on BugGuide, but there were no images of what we suspected might be eggs.  The Bug of the Week site has a nice image with the caption:  “Eggs of the giant bark aphid are the overwintering stage. They line small branches by the thousands and change from amber to black as they age.”

Giant Bark Aphids

Giant Bark Aphids

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Stumped me!
Geographic location of the bug:  Poconos, PA
Date: 10/21/2019
Time: 07:39 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I’m the go-to bug identification nerd for friends and family; if I don’t know them outright, I can almost always track them down on What’s That Bug. This one, though, evades me. Any chance you can help out? this is the only photo  they got. Thanks very much.
How you want your letter signed:  Rob W.

Spotted Lanternfly

Dear Rob,
This is an invasive, exotic Spotted Lanternfly
Lycorma delicatula, and according to BugGuide:  “Native to China, India, Japan and Vietnam; invasive in Korea and in our area” and “earliest NA record: PA 2014.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination