Currently viewing the category: "Aphids, Scale Insects, Leafhoppers, and Tree Hoppers"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this insect?
Geographic location of the bug:  Battery Park City, Manhattan NYC
Date: 10/15/2017
Time: 06:25 PM EDT
I saw this insect in NYC on 10/14/17. I can not identify it with my insect field guide or any online resources. It is about ⅞ inch long, with two sets of veined wings, smallish eyes, and a proboscis type mouth. The legs are rather long.
How you want your letter signed:  Gerry LaPlante

Giant Conifer Aphid

Dear Gerry,
Based on this BugGuide image, this looks like a Giant Conifer Aphid to us. There is some helpful information on Influential Points where it states:  “This aphid has an entirely jet-black head, thorax and abdomen.”

Right on!!!
Thank you so much!
Looking at the photos available online, I agree with your assessment.

Gerry LaPlante
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  I.D
Geographic location of the bug:  Brenigsville , Pa.
Date: 10/11/2017
Time: 04:11 PM EDT
Working in a development, storm water basin . Haven’t been  able to identify  so far . Is it native or invasive?
How you want your letter signed:  Andy

Spotted Lanternfly

Dear Andy,
Alas, this is an invasive, exotic Spotted Lanternfly,
Lycorma delicatula.  According to BugGuide:  “native to China, India, Japan and Vietnam; invasive in Korea and in our area (PA)(1); currently (2017) known from 4 counties in PA” and “SIGHTING REPORTS WANTED: Experts are working to delimit the current population and find new infestations of this species. Please report sightings on the Pennsylvania Dept. of Agriculture website.  earliest NA record: PA 2014.”

Spotted Lanternfly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Can’t find any bugs like this
Geographic location of the bug:  Sierra National Forest
Date: 09/27/2017
Time: 11:53 PM EDT
I was camping at Dinkey Creek and went down to the reflecting pool to fish. As I left I found several of these bugs on my bag.  I’m very curious what they are! Can you give me any help?
How you want your letter signed:  Chris

Oak Treehopper Nymph

Dear Chris,
In the past week, we have posted several images of groups of Oak Treehopper nymphs on twigs.  Your image of an isolated Oak Treehopper nymph on a plain background is an excellent addition to our archives.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Black and white striped bug with red
Geographic location of the bug:  Crownsville, MD
Date: 09/27/2017
Time: 10:24 AM EDT
Hi,
I have never seen these bugs before in my area and was wondering if you could help. I wasn’t sure if they were a type of beetle or something different. Thanks so much for your help!
How you want your letter signed:  Carrie Jones

Oak Treehopper Nymphs

Dear Carrie,
These are immature Oak Treehoppers.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unusual cicada??
Geographic location of the bug:  Vienna, Virginia
Date: 09/23/2017
Time: 04:39 PM EDT
Hello Bugman,
My horticulture friend sent me this photo of cicada like insects on a birch tree in September in northern VA, but the wings do not look cicada like and I have never seen “horns” on cicadas. They look positively creepy!
Can you help us identify?
How you want your letter signed:  Stumped gardener

Oak Treehopper Nymphs

Dear Stumped Gardener,
Is your friend certain these Treehopper nymphs were on a birch tree?  They are Oak Treehopper nymphs,
Platycotis vittata, based on this BugGuide image, and according to BugGuide, the habitat is:  “Forests and forest edges, parks, and anywhere Oak trees are found. Occasionally found on other trees, but these individuals were probably just resting on those non-Oak trees.”  Since nymphs cannot fly, they were likely feeding on the plant upon which they were found.  Treehoppers and Cicadas are both in the same superfamily, hence the resemblance.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Feeling Pink
Geographic location of the bug:  Andover, NJ
Date: 09/23/2017
Time: 10:32 AM EDT
I found this leafhopper inside my house this morning and quickly ushered it into a jar and outside onto some plants. The color and patterns seem quite distinctive and my best guess is that it is in the Genus Gyponana, but would really appreciate your thoughts/expertise. Attaching lateral and side view.
Thanks!
How you want your letter signed:  Deborah E Bifulco

Leafhopper

Good morning Deborah,
Based on this BugGuide image, we concur that this Leafhopper is most likely in the genus
GyponanaBugGuide does note:  “Very few species are readily identifiable based on external characters.”

Leafhopper

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination