Currently viewing the category: "Aphids, Scale Insects, Leafhoppers, and Tree Hoppers"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Bug I can’t identify
Geographic location of the bug:  Northern NJ
Date: 11/11/2019
Time: 01:32 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Saw these on a pin oak this morning
How you want your letter signed:  Ryan Moore

Giant Bark Aphids

Dear Ryan,
We quickly identified what we suspected were Giant Bark Aphids,
Longistigma caryae, on BugGuide, but there were no images of what we suspected might be eggs.  The Bug of the Week site has a nice image with the caption:  “Eggs of the giant bark aphid are the overwintering stage. They line small branches by the thousands and change from amber to black as they age.”

Giant Bark Aphids

Giant Bark Aphids

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Stumped me!
Geographic location of the bug:  Poconos, PA
Date: 10/21/2019
Time: 07:39 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I’m the go-to bug identification nerd for friends and family; if I don’t know them outright, I can almost always track them down on What’s That Bug. This one, though, evades me. Any chance you can help out? this is the only photo  they got. Thanks very much.
How you want your letter signed:  Rob W.

Spotted Lanternfly

Dear Rob,
This is an invasive, exotic Spotted Lanternfly
Lycorma delicatula, and according to BugGuide:  “Native to China, India, Japan and Vietnam; invasive in Korea and in our area” and “earliest NA record: PA 2014.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  1cm insect with 4 wings (9/15/19,6pm)
Geographic location of the bug:  Riverside, California
Date: 09/15/2019
Time: 09:18 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found this bug sitting on my indoor bamboo plant,it would scurry outta my sight like a squirrel on a tree. It looks like it has 2 eyes on either side but the underside that is yellow resembles the texture a flys eye.
How you want your letter signed:  V

Glassy Winged Sharpshooter

Dear V,
This is a Glassy Winged Sharpshooter,
Homalodisca vitripennis, and according to BugGuide:  “A major vector of Pierce’s disease on grape. Usually not a serious pest within its native range, southeastern US. This species was accidentally introduced into so. California in the early 1990s, probably with ornamental or agricultural stock. There, it has become a serious threat to viticulture.”  According to Featured Creatures, the Glassy Winged Sharpshooter:  “feeds in the xylem, the water conducting tissue of both herbaceous and woody plants. Its known host range is vast, including more than 100 plant species (Turner and Pollard). Preferred plants depend on the season and locality, but, in general, the preferred species include crape myrtle, citrus, and holly. Glassy-winged sharpshooters tend to feed on last-year’s growth and meristematic growth (Mizell and French), and excrete copious amounts of liquid as they feed. The sharpshooters ingest 100 to 300 times their dry body weight in xylem fluid per day, and in large populations, their high volume of excreta (“leafhopper rain”) can become a problem, leaving white residue on leaves.”  We have received reports of the Glassy Winged Sharpshooter on Cannabis, including this submission by a regular contributor, Constant Gardener.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  One horn, base of horn covers all body
Geographic location of the bug:  Montgomery hills, Maryland (silver spring)20910
Date: 07/28/2019
Time: 09:49 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear bugman, I wish I had more photos for you….sitting still in a parking lot, this thing landed on my arm with such force I thought I was hit with a stone! It then leaped forcefully backwards, flipped, and stuck to my side window. It was a dark, gray brown color.(Maybe had some small spots??  If you looked at it from an Ariel view, it would look like the cap of an acorn. The wide base of horn protected the entire body and wings! I’m assuming it’s a type of beetle….
Good luck, and I’ll keep my fingers crossed you have an answer for me!
How you want your letter signed:  Thanks for your time! sara

Treehopper

Dear Sara,
Based on the insect’s silhouette and your location, we believe we have correctly identified this Treehopper as Glossonotus turriculatus thanks to images posted to BugGuide.  Hosts listed are oak and hickory.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Lovely green wing cases
Geographic location of the bug:  Sale, Manchester, uk
Date: 07/15/2019
Time: 03:13 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi bugman,
Thought you might appreciate these lovely shades of green as much as me! I’ve seen these creatures before but usually in brown or bright green. They jump like fleas so I’ve called them hoppers in the past but I’ve no idea what they usually go by. I’ve noticed they hatch out of what looks like blobs of spit on grass. I’m also interested to know if they are a pest in our veg patch or pest control. It would be great if you could shed some light on it for me. Bug obviously came in from the garden in July.
Thank you!
How you want your letter signed:  Beth J.

Green Leafhopper

Dear Beth,
This is a Leafhopper in the family Cicadellidae, and it is green, and when we finally identified it as
Cicadella viridis on NatureSpot, we learned the common name is the obvious Green Leaf-Hopper.  According to NatureSpot:  “Length 6-8 mm. A large and eye-catching species. The bicoloured pronotum (yellow at the front and green at the rear) is distinctive. The forewings of the female are bright turquoise green, but those of the male are much darker blue-purple and may even be blackish.”  Additional images can be found on British Bugs.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this Hopper on my Cannabis?
Location: Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
July 8, 2019 7:51 am
Subject:  Hi Bugman,
As my Cannabis plants grow larger, I’ve noticed that many of the plants have predators on them.  In addition to the Mantid I submitted earlier this year, I am happy to report that four of my plants have mantids on them and several have Green Lynx Spiders as well.  Can you please identify the hopping insect that I have found on my plants this year.  One of the images of the Green Lynx Spiders I am sending has it eating an immature hopping insect, though it is difficult to see.  The other image is of a winged adult.
Thanks
Signature: Constant Gardener

Green Lynx Spider eats (presumably) Glassy-Winged Sharpshooter nymph

Dear Constant Gardener,
Thanks so much for keeping our readers informed about your thriving
Cannabis ecosystem.  The adult hopping insect is a Glassy-Winged Sharpshooter, and according to BugGuide:  “The biggest problem is that it can spread the disease-causing bacterium Xylella fastidiosa.  The most important biocontrols are egg-parasite wasps in the genus Gonatocerus. Spiders, assassin bugs, and praying mantis prey on the mobile forms.”  Several years ago, we received a report of Glassy-Winged Sharpshooters, Homalodisca vitripennis, on marijuana.  According to the University of California Integrated Pest Management Program site:  “The glassy-winged sharpshooter is found in many habitats, including agricultural crops, urban landscapes, native woodlands, and riparian vegetation. It feeds on hundreds of plant species across dozens of plant families. Hosts include numerous common woody plants as well as annual and perennial herbaceous plants. It is common to find this insect on acacia, avocado, eucalyptus, citrus, crepe myrtle, heavenly bamboo, grape, photinia, pittosporum, hibiscus, periwinkle, xylosma, some roses, and many others. Host preference changes throughout the year, depending on the availability and nutritional value of host plants. Some hosts are preferred for feeding while others are preferred for reproduction. Irrigation level and fertilizer additions can also impact the attractiveness of hosts for sharpshooters.”  There is no mention of Cannabis.  We presume the nymph being eaten by the Green Lynx Spider is a member of the same species.

Glassy-Winged Sharpshooter

Green Lynx Spider

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination