Currently viewing the category: "Aphids, Scale Insects, Leafhoppers, and Tree Hoppers"
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Subject: Black and White bug on Fig Leaf
Location: Phoenix, Az
March 20, 2017 7:01 pm
Hey there while watering my fig tree I noticed this odd looking black and white bug.
It appeared to be fighting with/ holding a gnat of some kind. In any case the gnat was trying to get away.
Was hoping to identify the bug , any help is appreciated!
Signature: Cait

Aphid Wolf attacks Aphid

Dear Cait,
This is a predatory Lacewing Larva, commonly called an Aphid Wolf, and it has captured an Aphid, not a Gnat.  Aphids are considered significant agricultural pests, and Lacewing Larvae are an effective organic method of controlling the problem without introducing insecticides.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown Bug on maple leaves
Location: Springfield, NJ
March 3, 2017 9:18 pm
A large number of these pinhead sized bugs hatched on my bonsai maple buds and leaves on a warm February week.
Signature: Any

Maple Aphid, we believe

This is an Aphid, and based on our research and information contained on Influential Points and BugGuide, we suspect this is a Maple Aphid, Periphyllus testudinaceus, a species native to Europe. 

Thanks Daniel,
This is great information and very interesting.
Robert

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: bugs in my eucalyptus
Location: Ballarat Australia
February 25, 2017 9:57 pm
I found a cluster of these bugs in one of the eucalyptus trees at my house. They are about 1 cm long and jump / fly when touched – though one did crawl happily over my hand. They don’t seem to bite. Further investigation found about 40 smaller ones – similar legs and body colour – but no wings. I can’t see what they are eating – but if they are likely to eat too much of the tree, I’ll need to do something. So, I’d love to know what they are.
Signature: Kerry

Black Gum Leafhoppers

Dear Kerry,
Thanks to the Brisbane Insect site, we believe we have identified your insects as Black Gum Leafhoppers in the Tribe Eurymelini.  According to the site:  “The Eurymelini are only found on eucalypts, so their common name Gum-leafhoppers. They are brightly coloured or predominantly black.”  We are reluctant to provide a species name as many members of the tribe look similar. 
Eurymela bakeri which is pictured on the New South Wales Government site looks very close, but Eurymela distincta, which is also pictured on the New South Wales Government site looks even more similar.  The site advises:  “Caution Many of the insects depicted on these pages are outwardly similar and you should not use photographs as the sole means of identification. These pages form part of a scientific key which will assist a trained entomologist to identify the species accurately.”  The latter species is also pictured on Jungle Dragon.  All Leafhoppers have mouths designed to pierce and suck fluids from plants, and if they are plentiful and lacking in natural predators, they might pose a health risk to weakened plants, however since they are a native species for you and they are feeding on a native plant, we don’t believe they will cause serious harm to your trees unless they are already stressed because of drought or disease.

Black Gum Leafhoppers

Thank you so much for that.they are rather  cute and the tree looks ok.
Just have to watch them. Kerry

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug on cashew tree- planthopper?
Location: Bali, Indonesia
February 22, 2017 12:14 am
Hi there!
We have a mystery planthopper who loves our cashew trees. It causes quite a problem for our farmers and we would like to identify the specific species, or at least know what kind of natural treatment would work best!
Signature: Mara Moran

Flatid Planthopper

Dear Mara,
We began our search on BugGuide, a North American site, in an attempt to narrow down this Planthopper to the family Flatidae, and according to BugGuide, they feed on:  “above-ground portions of a wide variety of woody/semi-woody plants.”  Your individual resembles
 Euphanta munda on BunyipCo where it states:  “The genus is a northern one with species known from Nerw Guinea, Fiji and Indonesia. This one measures about 7 mm.”  Using a key word search, we located an article on Jurnal Entomologi Indonesia that mentions Sanurus indecora feeding on cashew trees.  An image of the species on Independent Academia appears to match your individual.  While we cannot read the site, http://ditjenbun.pertanian.go.id/sinta/wereng-pucuk-mete-wpm/ may also be helpful.

Flatid Planthopper Nymph

Flatid Planthopper Nymphs

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Planthopper?
Location: Porto Alegre, Brazil
February 18, 2017 10:59 am
Hi again. I know this one it’s under the hemiptera order and I BELIEVE it is a planthopper from fulgoridae family. But I can’t find its exact name or this exact color. I found just one picture of the same bug but the person was saying it was a cicada (not true). It was not bigger than 3cm and was found in Porto Alegre, Brazil, in the morning. Do you have any idea about its name or something more specific? But any information or at least a confirmation would be appreciated! Thanks in advance. – 2 pictures attached.
Signature: Brenda Lavoieri

Planthopper

Dear Brenda,
This is definitely a Free Living Hemipteran in the Suborder Auchenorrhyncha, and it might be a Fulgorid Planthopper, but we cannot state for certain to which family it is a member.  Perhaps Cesar Crash who runs Insetologia will recognize this red-eyed hopper.

Planthopper

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug
Location: Northeastern United States (Pennsylvania)
January 27, 2017 4:39 pm
I took this picture on my way to an appointment. I have looked through numerous books and haven’t been able to find out what it is.
Signature: -Future Scientist

Spotted Lanternfly

Dear Future Scientist,
If you were searching guidebooks of native species, you would not find this Spotted Lanternfly,
Lycorma delicatula, a species native to China.  Though we immediately recognized it, the reason is that we have received submissions for years from Korea where it has been introduced and where it is sometimes called a White Cicada.  We were not aware it had been found in North America, and according to BugGuide:  “Confirmed in Berks County, PA, in Sept. 2014.”  BugGuide also recommends:  “SIGHTING REPORTS WANTED: Entomologists are working to delimit the current population and discover any new infestations of this potentially destructive species. If you have seen this insect, please report your sighting using one of the methods provided on the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture website.”  Since it is the middle of winter, we suspect this is not a recent sighting for you.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination