Currently viewing the category: "Ants"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Fleeing the scene of the crime…
Location: Sussex County, NJ
August 12, 2017 1:05 pm
I thought you might enjoy this one for your Life Cycle gallery. A Sycamore Assassin Nymph leaving the corpse of a small ant. Kind of hard to be discreet when wearing an orange jumpsuit…
Have a great weekend.
Signature: Deborah Bifulco

Sycamore Assassin Bug eats Ant

Dear Deborah,
Thanks for providing your image of an immature Sycamore Assassin Bug and the corpse of an Ant it has feasted upon.  As you indicated, it will be an excellent addition to our Food Chain tag.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large Ant
Location: Stow, Ohio
June 9, 2017 11:10 am
Found this guy snooping around the house today. 6/917
Signature: Cooper

Eastern Black Carpenter Ant

Dear Cooper,
This is an Eastern Black Carpenter Ant,
Camponotus pennsylvanicus.  According to BugGuide, the habitat is “Broadleaf and mixed forests (both floodplain and upland), woodlands, tree-studded parks, cemeteries, and lawns. The nest is in dead, usually already rotten wood. Occasionally nest in wooden buildings, typically where wet or dry rot has softened the wood. Probably increasing in numbers and distribution in the West due to extensive tree planting in the Plains.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Huge ant in Costa Rica
Location: Tortuguero, Costa Rica
June 6, 2017 4:35 pm
Hi Bugman,
In ten years of living in Tortuguero, Costa Rica, I’ve never seen this species of ant before. It was quite slow, and apparently somewhat blind. Hope you can help!
Signature: Jen

Leafcutter Ant Queen

Dear Jen,
This is a queen Leafcutter Ant, and we usually get images of winged alates when they swarm.  Once they have mated, they shed their wings and look for a place to establish a colony.  Here is an image from Ask A Biologist.

Leafcutter Ant Queen

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: WTB ?
Location: N.E. Alabama
May 28, 2017 10:03 am
My daughter n law was bit by what she described as a flying ant outside. Later the next day I found this in the floor of my laundry room thinking it mite have been what bit her.
Signature: Dmeado

Carpenter Ant Alate

Dear Dmeado,
Earlier today we posted an image from North Carolina of what we believe to be a male Carpenter Ant alate, the winged reproductive form that swarms when weather conditions are right.  We believe your image is that of a female Carpenter Ant alate, possibly
Camponotus castaneus, based on this BugGuide image.  We believe the best way to distinguish the males from the females is the shape of the head and the longer antennae on the males as he uses his antennae to help locate a female.  BugGuide notes:  “Alates noted May-June (Mississippi) and September (Mississippi, North Carolina)” so your swarm seems quite on schedule.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this bug
Location: North Carolina
May 28, 2017 10:46 am
They seem to have showed up out of no where and there are a lot of them sitting somewhat peacefully all around and all over the outside of our home.
Signature: Thanks Joe.

Carpenter Ant Alate

Dear Joe,
This looks to us like a male Carpenter Ant alate, the winged reproductive form that swarms when conditions are right, often a warm sunny day after a good rain.  It might be a
Camponotus castaneus based on this BugGuide image, a species BugGuide calls the Reddish Carpenter Ant and states:  “Nests in rotting logs, soil under rocks, etc., or even in exposed soil.”

Carpenter Ant Alate

Thank you so much. The photo and identified conditions are consistent with what I see.
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Driveway Swarm of these Flying Insects
Location: Southern California
May 4, 2017 8:58 pm
This morning there were hundreds of these flying insects lying dead in the driveway, grouped in a fairly small area about 6 feet across. I scooped up a few onto white paper, added a ruler and took a picture. I’m curious – are these flying ants or are they (heaven forbid) termites?
Signature: Gene

Red Imported Fire Ant Alates

Dear Gene,
These are the reproductive alates of the only species of Ant ubiquitous across Southern California, the Argentine Ant.  When it is time to swarm, winged males and females take flight to mate and start new colonies.  In our opinion, the Argentine Ant is the most destructive invasive exotic species in Southern California, and it does much more damage than the dreaded Med Fly.

Correction:  May 14, 2017
We just received a correction from Ben that these are more likely Red Imported Fire Ant alates, and this BugGuide image does support that correction.  According to BugGuide:  “native to South America, adventive in our area and spreading throughout so. US north to MD-IL-MO-TX-CA); introduced to many Old World countries” and “The most aggressive and widespread of the fire ants found in North America. It was introduced into the US from Brazil between 1933 and 1945.  If their nest is stepped on, the workers rush out and sting the feet and legs of the intruder. Each sting results in a small, painful wound that develops into a pustule in 24-48 hours. As the pustules heal they become itchy and can become infected.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination