Currently viewing the category: "Amphibians"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Amphibian?
Geographic location of the bug:  West Michigan, Holland
Date: 10/07/2017
Time: 09:07 PM EDT
Came on my stoop during a rainstorm
How you want your letter signed: Brian

Red-Backed Salamandar

Dear Brian,
This is definitely a Salamandar, an Amphibian.  We looked at the Michigan Department of Natural Resources Salamandar page, and your individual looks most like the Red-Backed Salamandar,
Plethodon cinereus.  According to the Michigan Department of Natural Resources:  “A thin bodied little salamander that occurs in two common color phases. The ‘redback’ phase has a reddish or orange stripe down the back and tail, bordered by darker sides. The ‘leadback’ phase lacks the stripe, and has a dark colored back, sometimes speckled with faint light spots. In both the belly is mottled with a white and gray ‘salt and pepper’ pattern. Adults are 2.3 to 5 inches (5.8 to 12.7 cm) long.”  The site also states:  “Found state wide in woodlands, especially deciduous woods with thick leaf litter and many decaying logs or stumps. Food is mostly small insects and other invertebrates.”

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: New Jersey leech like insect
Location: Gloucester County New Jersey, USA
August 2, 2017 8:17 pm
I have standing water on my property that is there from rain, not spring feed, today while looking at the water, I noticed these flat brownish insects in the water, I don’t remember seeing these bugs before, I thought they might be leeches but every picture I googled of leeches showed them being black. Also these bugs have pitchers, please help, thank you,
Signature: D. Clement

Water Tiger and Tadpoles

Dear D. Clement,
This appears to be a predatory larva of an aquatic beetle, commonly called a Water Tiger.  It is surrounded by Tadpoles, and they are most likely its prey.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  California Slender Salamanders
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
February 14, 2016
We decided to do some late afternoon gardening, and we occasionally overturn a log in the garden just to see what we can find.  We keep rotting logs in the yard for habitat, and we have also constructed our garden walls from broken concrete.  Decisions like that are important for providing habitat for native species.  Well, under the first log was a cute little California Slender Salamander in the genus
Batrachoseps, most likely the Garden Slender Salamander, Batrachoseps major major, which is found in Southern California.  According to California Herps Identifying Salamanders page:  “This is the small worm-like salamander commonly found in gardens and yards in coastal southern California. It is often seen under surface objects, especially in moist and shaded areas, but it may also be found under cover in open areas including coastal chaparral. This is a small, thin salamander, which might look like a worm on first sight, before the tiny limbs are noticed. Often they will be found coiled up under a surface object. When disturbed, they may spring up and writhe on the ground, wagging their tail, which sometimes is let loose as a distraction. It is also easily detached when a salamander is handled. Many of these salamanders will be found with an incompletely re-grown tail.  This is one of two small, slender salamander occuring in Southern California in the areas shown on the map below, but the second species is less commonly encountered and is found in the mountains. There are many other species of slender salamanders occuring throughout the state which all look so much alike that they are nearly impossible to identify without using a range map.” Upon overturning a neighboring log, we found two more Garden Slender Salamanders. All were about three inches long. We carefully replaced the logs after taking a few images.

Garden Slender Salamander

Garden Slender Salamander

Garden Slender Salamanders

Garden Slender Salamanders

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: other animals
Location: Vancouver, WA
August 13, 2015 8:26 am
I love your website! You have helped me on more than one occasion. Do you know of a similar site to help one identify other animals? Specifically, today’s question regards a frog that a neighbor found in her upstairs bathroom in western washington this morning. She has a picture of it. I haven’t found one I’m sure of by searching images, so wondered if there is a good source to ask. Thanks!
Signature: Carla Dillenburg

Pacific Chorus Frog

Pacific Chorus Frog

Dear Carla,
The very loose definition we use for “Bug” is “things that crawl” so we do have an Amphibian category on our site.  This is a Pacific Tree Frog or Pacific Chorus Frog, and according to State Symbols USA:  “The Pacific chorus frog (also called Pacific tree frog) can be brown, tan, grey or green, and produce their charming sound by puffing up their throat sacs to three times the size of their heads.”  The site also notes:  “Washington designated the Pacific chorus frog (Pseudacris regilla) as the official state amphibian in 2007 (proposed by a third grade class at Boston Harbor Grade School in North Olympia, Washington). The Pacific chorus frog is a native amphibian found in every county of Washington state.”  California Herps has some nice images.

Thank you!  Is it possible it arrived in her second floor bathroom via plumbing?  She has no windows in that bathroom, and all other windows screened and closed.

We think not.  Tree Frogs climb quite well, and we would favor a window or accidental transport.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Weird bug in tank
Location: Karnse county, TX
May 2, 2015 2:18 pm
I found this bug in a tank at my house and was wondering what kind its
Signature: thanks

Dragonfly Naiad and Tadpoles

Dragonfly Naiad and Tadpoles

This is an aquatic Dragonfly Nymph, known as a Naiad, an aquatic predator that may eat your small Tadpoles.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

fishing spider??
August 22, 2011 10:17 am
i posted pics to your facebbok page and have tried 3 time s unsuccessfully ot send them to you on here, it wont upload them. its a green spider, in the water and it had grabbed a tiny tadpole out of the water. its beena  couple of months since i posted them! wondering if you can help!
Signature: BIBEF

we do not check the facebook pages.  We reserve that as an open forum.  We only post letters that come to our website directly.  We are very curious about the photos of the spider you describe and we would love to see the photos.  Your aphid photos did arrive correctly.  Try attaching the spider photos to this response and please add all the information on the sighting, like location and date.
Thanks

hope it works this way, i have seen spiders near water, but never IN the water. the one pic is a good one of the spider, you can see its feet pressing on the surface of the water, and the second which sadly came out blurry, you can see the tadpole it grabbed out of the water in its mouth. i was only able to get the one with te tadpole and almost fell in the pond trying to get that one, so thats why only the blurry one! ive look ed at fishing spiders on your site and they dont really look like this one, but that could just be me!!

Six Spotted Fishing Spider

Dear Bibef,
We are very happy we requested you to resend these photos.  Other letters from you have come from Ohio.  Is this also Ohio?  This is definitely a Fishing Spider in the genus
Dolomedes, and we have identified it as a Six Spotted Fishing Spider, Dolomedes triton.  We have some old images in our archives, including these images from Louisiana, and this image from Florida,  but your image is the only we have received depicting a food chain image with aquatic prey.

Six Spotted Fishing Spider eats Tadpole

yes ohio, caesars creek state park to be exact, and thank you, fun finding out they come in a variety of colors!!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination