Currently viewing the category: "_Featured"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Eastern Tiger Swallowtails
Geographic location of the bug:  Campbell, Ohio
Date: 08/02/2020
Time: 11:10 AM EDT
Gentle Readers,
Daniel has been called out of town for a family emergency, and low and behold, he has finally entered the 21st Century by purchasing his first mobile phone, and he has been calling the iPhone 11 Pro he just bought his Magic Phone.  The magic phone takes gorgeous digital images, and Daniel has been taking images of the insects found in The Rust Belt.  Here are images of a male and female (blue scales on the underwings) Eastern Tiger Swallowtails that have been visiting the butterfly bush he is planting in his childhood front yard to replace the dead shrubs that are being removed.  Daniel apologizes for ignoring the numerous identification requests that have been flooding in, but family obligations are currently taking up most of his time.  Daniel hopes to also get some images of the Spicebush Swallowtails that he has seen in the past week.

The male Eastern Tiger Swallowtail is smaller and lacks the blue scales on the underwings.

The larger female Eastern Tiger Swallowtail has beautiful blue scales on the underwings.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Robber Fly?
Geographic location of the bug:  San Antonio TX
Date: 07/06/2020
Time: 05:40 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Took a few photos of this beautiful bug in my backyard.
May be a robber fly just hatched.
How you want your letter signed:  Niccodemure

Belzebul Bee Eater

Dear Niccodemure,
Thanks so much for sending in your gorgeous images of a very impressive Belzebul Bee Eater, one of the most magnificent North American Robber Flies. Daniel is running a bit behind this month, but he has selected your submission as the Bug of the Month for July 2020

Belzebul Bee Eater

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Yellow or Anise Swallowtail
Geographic location of the bug:  West Los Angeles
Date: 05/14/2020
Time: 05:47 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi Bugman,
Is this a yellow swallowtail or an anise swallowtail (or are they the same)? She’s laying her eggs on a fennel plant.
Thanks,
How you want your letter signed:  Jeff Bremer

Anise Swallowtail Ovipositing

Dear Jeff,
Please forgive our tardy response.  According to the Jeffrey Glassberg book
Butterflies Through Binoculars The West, the Anise Swallowtail has both a dark and a light or yellow form, and they are not designated as  distinct subspecies.  The two color forms exist over much of the species’ range.  According to BugGuide, there are two subspecies and BugGuide notes:  “There has been a lot of debate over the years as to whether the inland populations of P. zelicaon are different enough to consider as a distinct subspecies from ‘typical’ zelicaon from closer to the Pacific. Also, it is debated, assuming there is a difference, just what the difference is, and where one population begins and the other ends.”  We always appreciate your butterfly submissions and we are tagging this submission of an Anise Swallowtail as our Bug of the Month for June 2020.  As a side note, Daniel was excited to find a young Anise Swallowtail caterpillar on a dill umbel in his garden and he watched it grow over the course of a week, only to have it vanish.  The suspected culprit is a Paper Wasp seen patrolling the dill plant the day the caterpillar vanished.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Luna Moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Wakefield Quebec
Date: 05/27/2020
Time: 10:38 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This guy was a pleasant surprise today to my 5 year old son/ant and bug collector
How you want your letter signed:  Gene

Luna Moth

Dear Gene,
We are so excited that your submission is our first Luna Moth posting of the year, though one can only guess how many Luna Moth submissions arrived between April 21 when Daniel last checked his emails and now.  Canadian sightings are occur around June, and our earliest sightings, sometimes as early as January or February, are generally from Texas and Florida.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination