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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  North East Mexico Plague
Geographic location of the bug:  Monterrey
Date: 06/07/2019
Time: 12:38 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Worried about our forest, infestation of this insect. What is it what is the impact. Millions of these in our forest.
How you want your letter signed:  Raul

Katydid: Pterophylla beltrani

Dear Raul,
This is a gorgeous Katydid, and with a little searching, we are confident we have identified it as
Pterophylla beltrani  thanks to images and maps on iNaturalist.  We located an article entitled Geographic Distribution and Singing Activity of Pterophylla beltrani and P. robertsi (Orthoptera:  Tettigoniidae), Under Field Conditions where it states:  “Pterophylla beltrani, locally known as grilleta or false locust, constitutes an important forest pest in northern Mexico.  Populations of this species began to increase … in 1975.”  Since this is a native, local insect for you, we have a problem thinking of the large numbers you witnessed this year as an infestation.  Rather, we prefer to think about it as a possible indication of climate change.  Some species might not survive a change in climate while others may thrive.  At this point in time, Green New Deal or not, we believe that there has already been an irreversible effect on nature due to the changes, climactic and otherwise, that increasing populations of humans on planet Earth have created.  That stated, no one knows what the future will bring.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  White Eyed Bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Bernville, Pennsylvania
Date: 05/27/2019
Time: 06:27 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this sitting on the door frame of my patio door. I am trying to identify it, and hoping you might be able to help.
How you want your letter signed:  Troy

Mayfly

Dear Troy,
This unusual creature is a Mayfly in the insect order Ephemeroptera.  This BugGuide image and this BugGuide image of individuals in the genus 
Maccaffertium closely match your specimen.  Mayflies are unusual in the insect world in that their final molt is divided into two phases, the first being called the subimago, and though it is winged, it is not fully mature.  A second molting that usually occurs within a few days produces the mature adult.  We are uncertain why the eyes on your individual and on some of the images posted to BugGuide are white.  Your images are beautiful.  Though it is a few days before the beginning of June, we have decided to post your submission as the Bug of the Month for June 2019.  We hope someone can clarify why the eyes on some Mayflies are white.  Our suspicion is that this is a newly molted individual and that the eyes will eventually darken.

Mayfly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Luna moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Orange TX
Date: 04/04/2019
Time: 11:31 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I’ve never encountered a Luna moth, so I was so excited to see it in the backyard. It’s amazing! When they fly it almost looks like they have tiny legs.
How you want your letter signed:  Stacy

Male Luna Moth

Dear Stacy,
Thanks so much for submitting the first Luna Moth report we received this year.  We always enjoy posting the first Luna Moth sighting each year.  April is quite late for a first submission since we often have January or February sightings reported for Texas and Florida, while sightings from Maine and Canada don’t usually happen until late May or June.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Flying large bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Phoenix az
Date: 04/02/2019
Time: 10:40 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  What is this?
How you want your letter signed:  Honi

Whitelined Sphinx

Dear Honi,
This is a Whitelined Sphinx Moth, and they are currently flying in Southern California since there are three resting on the front door of the WTB? offices.  Significant rainfall in the southwest this winter resulted in “super blooms” in many desert areas, and the increase in vegetation also resulted in more food for caterpillars and moths.  We have yet to receive any reports of large numbers of Whitelined Sphinx Caterpillars this year, though we suspect we will receive such reports before long.  Some years the Whitelined Sphinx Moths are quite plentiful, and we suspect this will be one of those years.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination