Black and Yellow Mud Dauber Nest Removal: A Simple Guide for Homeowners

Mud daubers are a type of solitary wasp that create unique mud nests for their offspring.

One species commonly found is the black and yellow mud dauber, which builds a series of cylindrical mud cells, often plastered over with mud to form a smooth, fist-sized nest.

These insects are generally not aggressive and rarely sting unless threatened; however, when their nests are found around homes, they can become a nuisance.

Black and Yellow Mud Dauber Nest Removal
Black and Yellow Mud Dauber preys on Orbweaver

To efficiently remove the nests of black and yellow mud daubers, it’s essential to understand their behavior, nest structure, and the best methods for removal.

This article will guide you through the process of identifying mud dauber nests, as well as providing practical tips and techniques to remove them without putting yourself at risk of being stung.

Some common methods of nest removal include using a stiff brush or scraper to remove the nests, or even using a vacuum cleaner to suck up the nest and its contents.

However, it’s important to approach the situation with caution and choose the most effective technique for your particular situation.

As you read, you’ll gain a better understanding of these fascinating insects and how to properly handle their nests around your home.

Black and Yellow Mud Dauber Overview

Habitat and Range

  • Common in meadows and gardens
  • Found from Canada to the West Indies
  • Introduced to Europe and Australia

The black and yellow mud dauber (Sceliphron caementarium) is a commonly found wasp species in meadows and gardens across North America, with a range extending from Canada to the West Indies.

This wasp has also been introduced to Europe and Australia as well1.

Behavior and Habits

  • Solitary wasp species
  • Hunts spiders as prey
  • Builds mud nests

Belonging to the family Sphecidae, the black and yellow mud dauber is a solitary wasp. This species hunts spiders as prey and creates mud nests for their offspring.

A female mud dauber typically lays a single egg in each cell of her nest and provisions it with up to twenty-five live, paralyzed spiders2.

Identifying Features

  • Distinct black and yellow color
  • Metallic luster

A key characteristic of the black and yellow mud dauber is its distinct color pattern. The wasp exhibits a combination of black and yellow colors, often featuring a metallic luster.

Identifying these wasps can be relatively simple due to their unique appearance and behavior.

Comparison Table: Black and Yellow Mud Dauber vs. Organ-Pipe Mud Dauber

 Black and Yellow Mud DauberOrgan-Pipe Mud Dauber
ColorBlack and YellowBlack
Nest ShapeCylindrical mud cellsPipe-organ tubes
SizeAbout the size of a fistSlightly larger

Nest Characteristics and Behavior

Nest Construction

Black and yellow mud daubers (Sceliphron caementarium) construct their nests using mud, as their name suggests.

These nests typically consist of a series of cylindrical mud cells, eventually plastered over to form a smooth mud nest about the size of a fist 1.

In contrast, organ-pipe mud daubers (Trypoxylon politum) build characteristic pipe organ tubes on smooth surfaces 2.

Females and Nest Building

Female black and yellow mud daubers are responsible for nest building.

They lay a single egg in each cell of the nest and provision it with up to 25 live, paralyzed spiders3.

The spiders serve as food for the larval mud dauber. A few characteristics of their nest building process are:

  • Females forage for mud to build the nest
  • Mud cells are filled with paralyzed spiders for the larvae to feed on
  • Nests can be found in both abandoned and active cavities

Nest Locations

Mud daubers are versatile in their choice of nesting locations as they can be found in a wide variety of habitats.

Some common nesting spots for mud daubers include:

  • Abandoned holes
  • Eaves of homes
  • Walls and bridges
  • Inside human-made structures

These nests can be found in both abandoned and active cavities, making it important for homeowners to be vigilant in identifying and removing potential nesting sites to prevent potential issues.

Feeding Habits and Prey

Diet of Adults

The adult black and yellow mud dauber primarily consumes plant nectar and honeydew. Here are some examples of their diet:

  • Plant nectar from flowers
  • Honeydew produced by aphids

Feeding on nectar and honeydew helps adult mud daubers maintain their energy levels while searching for prey for their offspring.

Diet of Larvae

The diet of black and yellow mud dauber larvae mostly consists of spiders.

The adult females are known to hunt various types of spiders, paralyze them with their venom, and bring them back to the nest for their offspring.

Some examples of spiders they target include:

Here are the primary reasons for targeting spiders:

  • Control: Feeding on spiders helps control their population.
  • Paralyze: Mud daubers can easily paralyze spiders for their larvae to consume later.

The female mud dauber lays a single egg in each cell of the nest, which is then provisioned with up to twenty-five live, paralyzed spiders1. In doing so, the larva can feed on the fresh and immobilized spiders when it hatches.

Comparison Table

Diet AspectAdult Mud DaubersMud Dauber Larvae
Type of FoodPlant Nectar & HoneydewSpiders
Hunting BehaviorNoneFemales hunt & paralyze spiders
Role in EcosystemPollinator, Aphid ControlSpider Population Control

Reproduction and Lifecycle

Mating Behavior

Black and yellow mud daubers are solitary wasps that participate in a simple mating ritual. After finding a suitable mate, the male and female mate in the air.

Life Stages

These mud daubers have four life stages:

  • Egg: Female lays a single egg in each cell of the nest
  • Larva: Hatched from the egg, feeds on paralyzed spiders provided by the female
  • Pupa: Transforms from a larva, undergoing development
  • Adult: Emerges from the pupa, capable of reproduction

Development

  • Larvae feed on the paralyzed spiders before pupating
  • Pupae develop within the mud nest cell
  • Only one generation per year, with adults typically emerging in spring

Egg Laying

Adult females construct mud nests by collecting mud and forming it into small cylindrical cells.

They then lay a single egg in each cell, provisioning it with up to 25 live, paralyzed spiders for the developing larva to feed on.

Comparison Table

StageFeaturesDurationOccurrence
EggLaid in mud nest cell by females, provisioned with paralyzed spiders<1 weekOnce per generation
LarvaHatched, feeds on spiders1-3 weeksOnce per generation
PupaUndergoes metamorphosis2-4 weeksOnce per generation
AdultEmerges from pupa, capable of reproductionSeveral weeksOnce per generation

Characteristics of Black and Yellow Mud Daubers

  • Solitary wasps
  • Mating occurs in the air
  • Only one generation per year
  • Primarily prey on spiders
  • Rarely sting humans, stings are generally mild in pain

Black and Yellow Mud Dauber Nest Removal and Pest Control

When to Remove Mud Dauber Nests

Black and yellow mud daubers are solitary wasps that build hard mud nests, usually on ceilings and walls, attended by a single female wasp.

These wasps are not aggressive, but their venom can be painful if they sting. It is essential to remove their nests during late fall or winter when their activity is minimal.

  • Late fall or winter: Lower wasp activity
  • Spring and summer: High risk of stinging

Safety Measures and Precautions

Before attempting nest removal, follow these safety precautions:

  • Wear protective clothing (gloves, long sleeves, goggles)
  • Minimize disturbance to the wasps
  • Use an insect repellent if needed

Manual Removal Methods

You can remove mud dauber nests using the following methods:

  1. Scrape off the nest with a flat tool
  2. Apply soapy water to loosen the nest
  3. Dispose of the nest safely

Professional Pest Control Services

If you are uncomfortable removing the nests yourself, consider hiring a professional pest control operator. They have the necessary equipment and expertise to remove the nests safely and efficiently.

Prevention Methods

To prevent future mud dauber infestations, follow these tips:

  • Seal cracks and crevices where they may build nests
  • Regularly inspect your home for signs of nests
  • Remove clutter and debris that provide breeding and hiding spaces for wasps

Remember, mud daubers are considered beneficial insects since they help control spider populations.

Removal should be done when it’s absolutely necessary or when it poses a risk to humans or your property.

Conclusion

In conclusion, the black and yellow mud dauber is a solitary wasp species known for its unique mud nests. These wasps are generally non-aggressive and are rarely a threat to humans.

They play a beneficial role in controlling spider populations, as they hunt and paralyze spiders to feed their larvae. The nests, made of cylindrical mud cells, can be found in various locations, including homes.

While they are not typically aggressive, their presence can be a nuisance for homeowners.

If nest removal is necessary, it’s best done during late fall or winter when wasp activity is minimal, using precautions such as protective clothing and minimal disturbance.

Footnotes

  1. Black and Yellow Mud Dauber (Family Specidae) 2 3

  2. Black and Yellow Mud Dauber – Sceliphron Caementarium 2

  3. https://entnemdept.ufl.edu/creatures/MISC/WASPS/Sceliphron_caementarium.htm

Reader Emails

Over the years, our website, whatsthatbug.com has received hundreds of letters and some interesting images asking us about black and yellow mud daubers. Scroll down to have a look at some of them.

Letter 1 – Blue Mud Dauber

Metallic blue wasp
Location: Ottawa, Ontario
July 2, 2011 12:05 pm
I saw this striking metallic blue wasp two days ago at Mud Lake in Ottawa. I don’t remember exact size, just that it struck me as one of the largest wasps I’d ever seen.

The possibilities I know of are Blue Mud Dauber, Steel Blue Cricket Hunter, and Great Black Wasp. However I don’t know which of these species actually occur in Ottawa. Thoughts?
Thanks in advance!
Signature: Suzanne Britton

Blue Mud Dauber

Hi Suzanne,
You did a very nice job of narrowing down the possibilities, and we believe your first choice, the Blue Mud Dauber,
Chalybion californicum, is correct.  You can compare your image to the ones posted to BugGuide.

Letter 2 – Black and Yellow Mud Dauber gathers mud in Mt Washington

June 26, 2012
Location:  Mt Washington, Los Angeles, CA

Black and Yellow Mud Dauber gathers mud.


We spent much of Monday working in the garden, trying to get some summer crops planted, albeit on the late side.  Squash is a summer favorite, so we spaded a small patch and removed all the weeds.  We then planted squash and eggplant seeds brought from Italy by Luca. 

Then we gave the ground a good soaking.  Needless to say, the Black and Yellow Mud Daubers, Sceliphron caementarium, began to gather mud.  These nonaggressive solitary wasps frequent the carrot blossoms and onion blossoms in the vegetable patch and there are plenty of spiders for them to hunt.  The female Mud Dauber builds a nest of mud containing multiple chambers, each to house a single wasp larva. 

The female Mud Dauber hunts for spiders which she stings and paralyzes, ensuring that the developing larva will have a fresh supply of meat.  The adult wasps feed on nectar.  See BugGuide for additional information on Mud Daubers.

Black and Yellow Mud Dauber

Letter 3 – Black and Yellow Mud Dauber

Subject: One very strange bug….
Location: North of Seattle, Wa
July 30, 2016 4:10 pm
My cat was staring at this bug that got inside and first I thought it was a wasp so I picked it up and tossed it in the toilet and it started skeeting around
on the water so I took the below photos. I have no Idea what it is. Can you help?
I picked it up and put it outside
Can you help???
Signature: Don Everest

Black and Yellow Mud Dauber
Black and Yellow Mud Dauber

Dear Don,
This Black and Yellow Mud Dauber,
Sceliphron caementarium, actually is a wasp, and we are curious how you “picked it up and put it outside.”  The Black and Yellow Mud Dauber is a solitary wasp, and it is not an aggressive species, however, females are able to sting. 

According to BugGuide:  “Adults nectar at flowers; mud nests are built in all kinds of sheltered locations, incl. man-made structures, rock ledges, etc. Adults collect mud for nests at puddle/pool edges” and “nests are provisioned with spiders; adults common at flowers(3), especially parsnip and water parsnip, and visit hummingbird feeders.” 

Because you took pity on this Black and Yellow Mud Dauber, we are tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

Letter 4 – Black and Yellow Mud Dauber makes Nest

Subject: Mud dauber sighting
Location: Oregon
August 6, 2016 8:39 pm
This lovely lady was singing while she worked, which is how I found her. I thought there was a wild animal trapped underneath the cabinet, but when I moved the towel IN the cabinet I found her working away at her nest, making the strangest sound. I should have gotten a video :/
Signature: Tonya

Black and Yellow Mud Dauber makes nest
Black and Yellow Mud Dauber makes nest

Dear Tonya,
We know exactly the sound you are talking about.  We too have located Black and Yellow Mud Daubers constructing nests because of their “singing”.

Letter 5 – Black and Yellow Mud Dauber with Orbweaver

Subject: Mud Dauber with Araneus – Square Peg in a Round Hole!
Location: Thousand Hills State Park – Kirksville, MO
September 4, 2014 1:10 pm
Hi, Bugman!
I saw this rather interesting sight at work today. Apparently we have a Black and Yellow Mud Dauber nesting inside the hollows of our steel office door, and she has been getting in through a tiny gap above the door handle. I had seen a mud dauber hanging around the area, but didn’t realize there was one nesting there until I saw her on top of the door lever.

At first I thought that she might be injured, but on closer inspection, she was trying to squeeze through the gap with a particularly rotund spider she had caught! I managed to snap some photos of the mud dauber doing some very amusing gymnastics, struggling to get the spider through the gap, before she left.

Sadly, when she did give up and fly away, she did not drop the spider, which would have been helpful for identification! The most I can narrow down the spider is to the genus Araneus – which I realize, given the huge number of species under that umbrella, is like seeing an A-10 Warthog and identifying i t as ‘an aircraft of some kind.’

I was hoping you might have more luck in finding out what kind of spider our mud dauber had flown in, but, if not, then I simply hope you get a chuckle out of the photos.
Thanks!
Signature: EB

Black and Yellow Mud Dauber preys on Orbweaver
Black and Yellow Mud Dauber preys on Orbweaver
Mud Dauber tried to stuff Orbweaver in hole.
Mud Dauber tried to stuff Orbweaver in hole.
Mud Dauber kicks it with Orbweaver
Mud Dauber kicks it with Orbweaver

Dear EB,
We absolutely love your images of a Black and Yellow Mud Dauber attempting to return to its nest with this substantial Orbweaver.

Reader Emails

Over the years, our website, whatsthatbug.com has received hundreds of letters and some interesting images asking us about these insects. Scroll down to have a look at some of them.

Letter 1 – Mud Wasp Nest from Australia

 

Subject: What’s this? Location: Inner west sydney Australia January 19, 2013 7:17 pm We had a cover over out outdoor treadmill that wasn’t used for a while. When we took it off these are attached to the smooth plastic. I’m hoping they are moth/ butterfly cocoons rather than something more sinister. We are in inner west sydney NSW its the middle of summer and we have had some record breaking hot spells. Any info is hugely appreciated before we decide if to get rid of them. They are a mud brown colour and all slightly different sizes Signature: Mike bradley
Mud Wasp Nest
Hi Mike, The reason this looks a mud brown color is that it is a nest made of mud.  Mud Wasps construct nest like this all over the world and the female wasp provisions the nest with prey that serves as food for the wasp larvae.  Prey is often spider or caterpillars, and each species of Mud Wasp has its own diet.  Mud Wasps are solitary wasps and they are not aggressive.  We would urge you to allow these chambers to hatch naturally.  Each chamber serves as a nursery for a single wasp larva, so if all proceeds well, four wasps will eventually emerge.  We believe your nest is that of a Mud Dauber, possibly Sceliphron formosum, which provisions its nest with spidersYou can get additional information and see some photos on the Brisbane Insect website which states:  “The wasps build mud cells in sheltered locations. If the cell is opened, you will find a wasp larva, together with some spiders which are the larva’s food. Those spiders are collected by the mother wasp.”

Authors

    by
  • Bugman

    Bugman aka Daniel Marlos has been identifying bugs since 1999. whatsthatbug.com is his passion project and it has helped millions of readers identify the bug that has been bugging them for over two decades. You can reach out to him through our Contact Page.

  • Piyushi Dhir

    Piyushi is a nature lover, blogger and traveler at heart. She lives in beautiful Canada with her family. Piyushi is an animal lover and loves to write about all creatures.

7 thoughts on “Black and Yellow Mud Dauber Nest Removal: A Simple Guide for Homeowners”

  1. Thank you! It was only after she flew away that I noticed a small streak of mud on the handle in front of the gap from where she had been bringing in nesting materials. Initially, some of my coworkers made mention of getting out the bug spray. I promptly told them that our mud daubers in this state do not ‘defend’ their nest, and only sting if roughly handled. While doing a bit of searching, I even found something new on the Missouri Department of Conservation website! Apparently Blue Mud Daubers will re-use the old nests of Organ Pipe and Black and Yellow Mud Daubers. They bring balls of water to the nest to soften the mud and re-shape it to their needs. Not only that, they are known to be the biggest predator of Black Widows, which we have here in abundance (I don’t really mind them, they keep quietly to themselves, but I can understand why a lot of people would be unsettled knowing they’re around). I think (I hope) I have convinced them not to instigate any Unnecessary Carnage.
    Here is a link to the MDC mud dauber page (they have a great online field guide):
    http://mdc.mo.gov/discover-nature/field-guide/mud-daubers

    Have a nice day, and keep fighting the good fight!
    EB

    Reply
    • That information about preying upon Black Widows should help control the amount of Mud Dauber carnage if we can manage to disseminate the information.

      Reply
  2. Thank you! It was only after she flew away that I noticed a small streak of mud on the handle in front of the gap from where she had been bringing in nesting materials. Initially, some of my coworkers made mention of getting out the bug spray. I promptly told them that our mud daubers in this state do not ‘defend’ their nest, and only sting if roughly handled. While doing a bit of searching, I even found something new on the Missouri Department of Conservation website! Apparently Blue Mud Daubers will re-use the old nests of Organ Pipe and Black and Yellow Mud Daubers. They bring balls of water to the nest to soften the mud and re-shape it to their needs. Not only that, they are known to be the biggest predator of Black Widows, which we have here in abundance (I don’t really mind them, they keep quietly to themselves, but I can understand why a lot of people would be unsettled knowing they’re around). I think (I hope) I have convinced them not to instigate any Unnecessary Carnage.
    Here is a link to the MDC mud dauber page (they have a great online field guide):
    http://mdc.mo.gov/discover-nature/field-guide/mud-daubers

    Have a nice day, and keep fighting the good fight!
    EB

    Reply
  3. found blue mud wasp in Farmington, Michigan on 8/4/15. I’ve never seen a brighter flying insect other than a butterfly. Very beautiful so I looked it up and found out what it was on this website. Just wanted to share location and date. Thanks!!
    Ashley p

    Reply
  4. found blue mud wasp in Farmington, Michigan on 8/4/15. I’ve never seen a brighter flying insect other than a butterfly. Very beautiful so I looked it up and found out what it was on this website. Just wanted to share location and date. Thanks!!
    Ashley p

    Reply

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