From the monthly archives: "July 2021"

Subject:  Japanese Crane Fly?
Geographic location of the bug:  Wakayama, Japan
Date: 07/28/2021
Time: 05:46 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Looked like a wasp at first but then Google took me to your site and I think it’s very close to a crane fly you posted. It was sitting on my car at 35 degrees on July 27, 2021
How you want your letter signed:  Dirk

Crane Fly

Dear Dirk,
Your Crane Fly looks like an old posting from our archives that was identified as
Ctenophora ishiharai, and we located this FlickR posting that is identified as Ctenophora nohirae.  We believe the latter is a closer match.

Wow, thanks a lot!
Much appreciated.
Dirk

Subject:  Flying insect
Geographic location of the bug:  Irving tx
Date: 07/27/2021
Time: 05:09 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I thought this was a wasp chasing me in the flower bed. He buzzed loudly.
How you want your letter signed:  Peggy clark

Robber Fly: Microstylum morosum

Dear Peggy,
Thanks so much for sending in your marvelous images of this magnificent Robber Fly,
Microstylum morosum, which is pictured on BugGuide.

Robber Fly: Microstylum morosum

Subject:  Maybe it’s a katydid?
Geographic location of the bug:  Buffalo NY
Date: 07/28/2021
Time: 09:52 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Saw this sneaky man on a deciduous tree at an evergreen nursery this July and I think it’s a katydid but I can’t see wings!
How you want your letter signed:  Green bug man

Immature Angle Winged Katydid

Dear Green bug man,
This is indeed an immature Katydid and only adults have wings developed enough to fly.  We believe, based on this BugGuide image, that your Katydid is an Angle Winged Katydid in the genus
Microcentrum.

Subject:  Whats this Beetle?
Geographic location of the bug:  Southern Oregon (Medford)
Date: 07/30/2021
Time: 01:15 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  These Beetle’s have traveled to the SE, SW sides of our building. They are staying around the door jams and brick stem wall.Black with a thin orange line around their body. I search beetles of So Oregon and these were not listed. Thank you for your help, Darrell
How you want your letter signed:  Darrell

Conchuela Stink Bug

Dear Darrell,
You had difficulty with your identification because this is not a Beetle.  This is an immature Conchuela Stink Bug.

Subject:  bee type  bug
Geographic location of the bug: Halifax, MA
Date: 07/29/2021
Time: 12:37 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  makes in ground nest every year like an ant hole about a 1/2 inch.
Sandy soil, most nest are by driveway edge a patio edge
How you want your letter signed:  Tony

Sand Wasp

Dear Tony,
This looks like a Sand Wasp in the Tribe Bembicini, and the activity you describe is consistent with Sand Wasps.  Alas, we cannot provide a species identification.  According to BugGuide:  “About three quarters of the species prey on Diptera (Flies including disease carrying House Flies found around garbage), and it is believed that fly predation is ancestral in the group” which makes them beneficial.  Sand Wasps are not aggressive and the chances of getting stung are very unlikely.

Subject:  Flying insect
Geographic location of the bug:  Coquitlam, BC
Date: 07/27/2021
Time: 06:14 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this creepy flying insect while landscaping, never seen anything like it before curious what it is.
How you want your letter signed:  Zach Rayner

Horntail

Dear Zach,
This is a Horntail in the genus Uroceros, a type of Wood Wasp whose larvae bore in wood.  There are three similar looking species in the genus found in British Columbia.  It appears your image was shot in late afternoon sunlight, and when we corrected for the warm golden color that lighting at that time of day imparts to the subject it falls upon, we believe this is the White Horned Horntail Wasp,
Urocerus albicornis, which is pictured on BugGuide.   According to BugGuide:  “hosts include fir, larch, spruce, pine, Douglas-fir, hemlock, and western red cedar.”

Thank you very much for your quick response to my question it is highly appreciated
For a second I thought I had discovered a new species of insect because I had never seen anything like it before in my life
Thanks again!