From the monthly archives: "April 2020"

Subject:  Lots of these hovering in yard with sandy soil about 20 feet from our pond
Geographic location of the bug:  Chesapeake, VA
Date: 03/26/2020
Time: 03:43 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  These act like Scoliid wasps, but don’t look like them.  What are they?
How you want your letter signed:  Ruth

Digger Wasp

Dear Ruth,
The family Scoliidae contains several species of Flower Wasps or Scarab Hunters that resemble your individual.  The long antennae leads us to believe this individual is a male, and it looks like it might be
Dielis plumipes which is pictured on BugGuide.

Subject:  Unknown red bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Namibia Waterberg
Date: 03/27/2020
Time: 06:21 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello, we saw some of those bug in Namibia located at the Waterberg plateau. These bug were able to fly (very uncontrolled) and had an pulsating rump. Do you know what it is or what it will be some day after the final development?
Thank you.
How you want your letter signed:  Max

Sausage Fly

Dear Max,
This is a male Driver Ant in the genus
Dorylus, commonly called a Sausage Fly.  Of the genus, Springer Link Encyclopedia of Entomology states:  “Driver ants are those army ant species in the afrotropical subgenus Dorylus (Anomma) that hunt by massive swarm raids on the forest floor and up in the vegetation. Any animal capable of moving fast enough and lacking other effective protective mechanisms flees from such an advancing swarm of hundreds of thousands or even millions of ant workers in search of prey. Hence the raid swarm ‘drives’ many animals before it.”

Dear Daniel,
thank you very much for enlightening me!
Kind regards,
Max

Subject:  Found beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  Golden Shores AZ
Date: 03/28/2020
Time: 12:39 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I’d like to know what kind of beetle this is
How you want your letter signed:  Please and thank you

Inflated Beetle

We have identified your beetle, Cysteodemus armatus, on BugGuide.  It is commonly called a Desert Spider Beetle or an Inflated Beetle.

Subject:  Unknown bug
Geographic location of the bug:  South Carolina
Date: 03/29/2020
Time: 05:40 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found this bug in our house today. What is it?
How you want your letter signed:  Leta Wellman

Eyed Elater

Dear Leta,
This is an Eyed Elater, the largest Click Beetle in North America.  Is is harmless, and it poses no threat to your home.

Subject:  Metallic Green w/ black pattern
Geographic location of the bug:  Taveuni, Fiji
Date: 03/27/2020
Time: 05:17 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Is this a jewel beetle? It had landed on this floating seed pod and had not quite tucked his wing away. My underwater camera was already set up for macro so I wiped the lens and shot topside.
Roughly about 2 cm. Segmented antennae. Hard shell. Small thorax.
How you want your letter signed:  Richard

Jewel Bug

Dear Richard,
This is not a Jewel Beetle in the family Buprestidae.  It is not a beetle at all.  This is a Shield Bug in the family Scutelleridae, and because of their often bright, metallic colors, they are sometimes commonly called Jewel Bugs.  So this is a Jewel Bug, not a Jewel Beetle.  We have not had much luck identifying the species, but we did locate a matching image on The Organic Bunny blog, but you have to scroll down to see the unidentified image.

Thank you so much! You are the best!
Richard Todd

Subject:  Beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  Kentucky
Date: 03/28/2020
Time: 11:39 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  What is this never seen one before. 11:35pm march
How you want your letter signed:  Ellis

Water Scavenger Beetle

Dear Ellis,
We believe your aquatic beetle is a Water Scavenger Beetle in the family Hydrophilidae which is well represented on BugGuide.  Many aquatic insects, including Water Scavengers, are able to fly from pond to pond and some species may be attracted to lights.