From the monthly archives: "April 2020"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Guateng, South Africa
Date: 04/20/2020
Time: 05:20 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello there.
I found this in our garden this morning and would like to know if you have any idea on what exatly it is please
How you want your letter signed:  Any way the bug xpert likes

Hornworm of a Death’s Head Hawkmoth

Dear Any way,
This is the caterpillar of a Death’s Head Hawkmoth.  Hawkmoth caterpillars are commonly called Hornworms.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Crimson bug species? Panama fauna!
Geographic location of the bug:  San Miguelito, Panama.
Date: 04/14/2020
Time: 05:28 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi bugman. I’ve only seen this bug twice in my life 3 years appart first in 2009 and then in 2012. Both times it was just standing still inside my house and both insects were identical. Back then there were a lot of jungle-like green areas around my house for context. This bug was about 5cm / 2 inches long, had “feathery” antennae, transparent wings, the most posterior part of the abdomen was “hairy” (i think the sides of the abdomen were hairy too but less hairy) and I confirmed it was capable of flight as I accidentaly startled it when I was taking the photo. Well as you can see most of the body is colored with (really strong) red and black. The thorax has two parallel white lines. I never saw the ventral part of the insect.
Is this a moth? A butterfly? This question has been haunting me for 10 years. Well thanks and have fun with this one!
PS:Sorry if I used wrong terms in my anatomical description.
How you want your letter signed:  A curious physician

Scarlet Tipped Wasp Moth

Dear curious physician,
We are impressed that you identified this as a moth or butterfly.  It is a Moth, but one that is often mistaken for a wasp.  It is a Scarlet Tipped Wasp Moth,
Dinia aeagrus, and we identified it on Project Noah.  You can also find it pictured on FlickR.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Need Wing Identification
Geographic location of the bug:  South Africa
Date: 04/14/2020
Time: 02:58 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found these wings in my yard and i canot find anything on google please help
How you want your letter signed:  Please just email me thanks a lot

Wings of a Green Milkweed Locust

These are Grasshopper wings, and we are very confident they are the wings of a Green Milkweed LocustPhymateus viridipes.  As they are toxic to many animals and presumably unpalatable to others, we are curious what ate the body and left the wings behind.  Here is an image from FlickR and information on Wikipedia.  

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  spider looking bug on curtain
Geographic location of the bug:  singapore
Date: 04/02/2020
Time: 05:18 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  i found this egg cluster on my curtain and there were a few bunch of eggs surrounded by insects with 8(?) legs and i’m scarred.
How you want your letter signed:  –

True Bug Hatchlings

These are newly hatched True Bugs in the suborder Heteroptera.  Though there are some True Bugs like Bed Bugs and Kissing Bugs that will bite humans, most True Bugs are not directly harmful to people, though many are considered plant pests.  We cannot identify these True Bug hatchlings more specifically, but in our opinion, you have no cause for alarm.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is it
Geographic location of the bug:  Yarra glen 3775
Date: 03/24/2020
Time: 12:50 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Whats this bug please
How you want your letter signed:  Jen

Hairy Flower Wasp

Dear Jen,
This is a Flower Wasp or Scarab Hunter in the family Scoliidae, and based on the image posted to Museum Victoria Collections, we are relatively confident it is the Hairy Flower Wasp,
Austroscolia soror.  The site states:  “Austroscolia soror (previously in the genus Scolia is the most frequently seen species of Flower Wasp found in Victoria back yards. During the summer months Museums Victoria’s Discovery Centre receives many enquiries from people who are curious about a largish blue wasp. These wasps are usually identified as this species. These wasps will most likely be seen flying just above ground level and in particular flying near or around compost heaps, wood heaps or dead stumps of trees where the female wasps are looking for beetle larvae, (usually scarab beetles but sometimes weevils). Unlike the European Honeybee, European Wasp, and some native species, the Hairy Flower Wasps do not make a nest or form colonies. If several are seen flying around a compost heap or tree stump it simply means that several wasps are investigating for beetle larvae at the same time. The wasps are strong burrowers and when they find a beetle larva they sting and paralyse it and lay an egg on it. On hatching the young wasp has a live, paralysed food source waiting for it. Adult Hairy Flower Wasps drink nectar and so are frequent visitors to flowers where their size and colour make them easy to see when sitting on a flower. Nectar provides them with food energy in the form of sugars that they use to power their wing muscles. Hairy Flower Wasps do possess a sting, but they do not have a communal hive to defend and so tend not to be aggressive.”  Here is an image from our archive with a female Hairy Flower Wasp and her Scarab grub prey.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Termite?
Geographic location of the bug:  Anaheim California
Date: 04/01/2020
Time: 08:01 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I took this picture March 25, 2020 not sure what that bug is,
Hopefully someone can tell me.
How you want your letter signed:  Ken O

Mealybug

Dear Ken,
We are relatively certain this is a Mealybug based on this BugGuide image.  According to the University of Wisconsin Master Gardener Program:  “The citrus mealybug (
Planococcus citri) is the most common species found on plant foliage. It feeds on a wide variety of plants, and especially likes soft-stemmed and succulent plants such as coleus, fuchsia, croton, jade, poinsettia and cactus. In my greenhouse I also find them consistently on rosemary, citrus, and bird of paradise. ”  You did not indicate where you found it.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination