From the monthly archives: "July 2019"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Some sort of antlion?
Geographic location of the bug:  Northern California
Date: 07/24/2019
Time: 12:27 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello there! My dad was watering our plants outside and I guess managed to (accidentally!) shoot this guy right out of the air. He’s certainly had his bell rung, I’m taking care of him and hoping to let him go soon 🙂 But I’d like to know what he is as I’ve never seen anything like this creature before, and he’s BIG! I managed to find something called an “antlion” which he looks most like. Is that correct?
How you want your letter signed:  McKinley

California Fishfly

Dear McKinley,
This is not an Antlion.  It looks to us like a California Fishfly or Western Dobsonfly,
Neohermes californicus, which is pictured on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “appear to prefer streams (Chauliodes prefer still water)”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Not sure
Geographic location of the bug:  Teeswater Ontario
Date: 07/24/2019
Time: 07:35 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This bug was flying around the back yard and night. Dont know what it is can you help
How you want your letter signed:  Miss marci

Fishfly

Dear Miss Marci,
This is a Fishfly in the genus
Chauliodes, and because the antennae in your individual appear to be serrate, we are concluding that this is a female Spring Fishfly, which is pictured on BugGuide.  Despite being called a Spring Fishfly, there are Ontario sightings as late as September according to BugGuide data.

Fishfly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Painted Lady Caterpillars?
Geographic location of the bug:  Lake County Illinois
Date: 07/24/2019
Time: 07:11 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I work in a landscape yard so naturally I see a lot of critters. This one was new for me. We have a plant called helichrysum icicles that were covered in little busted open, poop filled,fuzzy tents and these caterpillars wandering aimlessly on the plants. Best I can tell, they are Painted Lady, but I am uncertain.
How you want your letter signed:  Karin

American Lady Caterpillar

Dear Karin,
In our opinion, you have the correct genus but not the correct species.  We believe this is an American Lady Caterpillar,
Vanessa virginiensis, based on this BugGuide image, and not a Painted Lady Caterpillar, Vanessa cardui, which is also pictured on BugGuide.

American Lady Caterpillars

Thank you so much! They didn’t seem to be doing anything destructive, thankfully.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What kind of bug is this!?
Geographic location of the bug:  Nebraska
Date: 07/24/2019
Time: 06:48 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I was just curious as to what kind of insect this is?  I live in Plattsmouth, Nebraska.  Never saw onelike this or don’tremember seeing one like this.  Youll see it better with zoom.
How you want your letter signed:  Brandon

Red Headed Ash Borer

Dear Brandon,
The Red Headed Ash Borer,
Neoclytus acuminatus, is a beetle that benefits from protective mimicry because it looks and acts like a stinging wasp.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Small Black/Yellow Beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  San Diego CA 92110
Date: 07/24/2019
Time: 05:59 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I’m trying to identify the following bug. It is about 1/8″ – 3/16″ long, black with hints of yellow, long antenna, and hair. I believe that it latched onto me while I was hiking through an area near a pepper tree and pine tree. I’ve searched the Internet without luck, but not the Dark Web 😉 Thanks!
How you want your letter signed:  RedSect Bug Lover

Longhorned Borer Beetle: Ipochus fasciatus

Dear RedSect Bug Lover,
We hope you are not considering us the Dark Web.  This is a Longhorned Borer Beetle in the family Cerambycidae, and we actually thought we were going to have a much more difficult time identifying it than we had.  We quickly identified it as
Ipochus fasciatus on BugGuide. According to Oxford Academic Group:  “Ipochus fasciatus LeConte apparently has newly, but imperfectly, adapted to feed and oviposit in milk thistle, Silybum marianum (L.) Gaertner, an alien, herbaceous, annual weed in southern California. This polyphagous, native cerambycid previously was known only from woody, perennial host plants.”  Knowing it has adapted to feeding on the invasive Milk Thistle is a good thing.

Daniel,
I was making a joking reference to the Dark Web, since I had such a difficult time finding info on the Ipochus fasciatus on the InterWeb.
I also had a difficult time finding any details on this little guy, but found this passage below about what it likes. We have the Rhus laurina (Laurel Sumac) on our hillside and this must be what attracted it.
Thanks for the ID and Info!
RedSect

Hi again RedSect,
Several of the plants in the list on your attached screenshot are growing in the WTB? gardens, including Laurel Leaf Sumac, Oak, Willow and endangered California Black Walnut.  We will keep an eye out for this diminutive Longhorned Borer Beetle.
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  A June Bug?
Geographic location of the bug:  Moorestown NJ, southern NJ
Date: 07/24/2019
Time: 04:16 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This bug was on the front steps during the afternoon. When I nudged it aside it hissed. It has large fuzzy antenna and yellow speckles on a black body. It is about an inch long.
How you want your letter signed:  Annette

Variegated June Beetle

Dear Annette,
Variegated June Beetles can produce a hissing sound by rubbing parts of their body together, an act known as stridulation.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination