From the monthly archives: "July 2019"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  narrow striped bug
Geographic location of the bug:  centerville utah USA
Date: 06/29/2019
Time: 12:43 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  i was reading a paper and saw a black speck moving so i pulled out my microscope and saw this. it’s the end of june.
How you want your letter signed:  hunter pitt

Thrips

Dear Hunter,
Thanks for submitting your excellent enlargement of a Thrips (same singular and plural) a tiny insect in the order Thysanoptera generally found in association with plants.  According to BugGuide:  “Thrips can often be found on flowers, they are especially visible on light colored flowers like daisies. Be aware that though they are very tiny, they can give a slightly painful bite.”  Identifying the actually species is beyond our area of expertise.

Thrips

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Moth?
Geographic location of the bug:  South Korea, Cheonan, Seonggeosan
Date: 06/30/2019
Time: 07:30 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello
Could you tell me if this is a moth? And what species is this please?
This was a very large insect with beautiful patterns on its wings!
Many thanks for your help.
How you want your letter signed:  Paul Scott

Giant Silkmoth: Brahmaea certhia

Dear Paul,
This Giant Silkmoth is positively stunning.  We quickly identified it as
Brahmaea certhia thanks to this Ebay posting, and we verified its identity on The Insect Collector.   Bold Systems, a more reliable source, confirms that identification.  We are quite curious about the unusual nature of the different tonalities in the underwings.  The left underwing is considerably lighter than the right side.

Giant Silkmoth: Brahmaea certhia

Thanks very much for the info. I hope to find more but considering this is the first one I have found in my three years of regular hiking in Korea, the chances might be slim.
Now I can read up about these creatures and learn a bit about them!
Thanks again!
Best wishes
Paul
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Bugs in my garden .potatoes?
Geographic location of the bug:  Wirtz Virginia
Date: 07/01/2019
Time: 11:13 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Could you please help identify what this bug is? They come out when the day starts to heat up and I have been seeing some of them on my potato plants. I will upload 2 pictures
How you want your letter signed:  Lyn

Green June Beetles

Dear Lyn,
These are Green June Beetles and one appears to be laying eggs.  We do not think they are harming your potatoes.  According to BugGuide food preferences are:  “
Adults: Pollen; ripening fruits, especially peaches; and the fruit and leaves of many shrubs. Larvae: roots of many plants including: grasses, alfalfa, vegetables, tobacco, and ornamental plants.”  Adults seem to prefer sugary foods like sap and ripe fruit, and larvae are considered pests that eat the roots of laws grasses.  BugGuide also notes:  “The adults can often be seen in numbers flying just inches over turf.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Bugs eating my corn
Geographic location of the bug:  Illinois – USS
Date: 06/30/2019
Time: 11:45 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Growing corn for years and this had never been an issue. Two types of bugs have destroyed all my corn in my garden.
How you want your letter signed:  Emilia

Margined Leatherwings

Dear Emilia,
Not every insect found on your corn plants is injurious to your crop.  The image with the smaller beetles does not have enough detail for us to provide an identification, but the beetles in two of your images are Margined Leatherwings,
Chauliognathus marginatus, and according to BugGuide:  “Adult feeds on pollen and nectar; also predatory. Larva is predatory, known to attack corn earworm and corn borer.”  This is actually a beneficial insect on your corn plants.  The damage that is visible to the ears of corn in the images you provided does not look to us like it was caused by insects.  We suspect rodents or some other larger creature is eating your corn at night, and that the Margined Leatherwings were accused of the damage through circumstantial evidence by merely being present at the scene of the crime.

Margined Leatherwing

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  bel air md
Date: 06/30/2019
Time: 01:49 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  what is this beetle and what is coming out of its butt?
How you want your letter signed:  Peg

Female Broad-Necked Root Borer

Dear Peg,
In July 2011, we designated the female Broad-Necked Root Borer,
Prionus laticollis, as the Bug of the Month, and we believe enough time has elapsed to select your submission as our Bug of the Month for July 2019.  The ovipositor, an organ used for laying eggs, is protruding from the end of her abdomen.  According to iNaturalist:  “The female is larger than the male, with an ovipositor used to deposit eggs. When the female is laying eggs, she “shivers” and eggs are laid through the ovipositor, positioned down into the soil or under litter, usually in groups of threes and twos, but sometimes ones or fours. After the eggs are laid, the female moves her ovipositor up and down to fill the hole she created. When freshly laid, the eggs are pure white, glistening with moisture, but, after a while, they usually change to a deep yellow. Within a few days, the deep yellow eggs turn to a light washed pink. As the larvae develop inside, the eggs turn ivory in color. The eggs are the size of small grains of rice. When the larvae are hatching, they chew through one of the elongated, pointed sides of the egg. The larvae’s heads are adapted for digging into the soil, and they have strong black mandibles for chewing roots.”

wow… how cool! thanks for your response!
Peg

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What’s this arachnid?
Geographic location of the bug:  Casa Grande, AZ (Sonoran Desert)
Date: 06/26/2019
Time: 08:56 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found this “little” guy in my house he’s about 4 inches in diameter its currently summer here in AZ. He was climbing the wall. Didn’t find a web or eggs. We get a lot of crickets around here so that may be his diet.
How you want your letter signed:  Gaston

Male Cellar Spider

Dear Gaston,
This appears to us, based on this BugGuide image, to be a harmless male Southern House Spider, a harmless species that is often mistaken for the highly venomous Brown Recluse.

Update:  Cellar Spider
Cesar Crash provided a comment indicating this is a member of the genus Physocyclus, a Cellar Spider, and this BugGuide image would support that identification.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination