From the monthly archives: "July 2019"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Black grasshopper?
Geographic location of the bug:  Costa Rica
Date: 07/26/2019
Time: 06:49 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hey bugman, I hope you can help find the name of this beautiful bug. I think I took the photo in February/March on the Caribbean coast, but it’s a few years back so I’m not 100% sure.
I appreciate your help!
How you want your letter signed:  David

Reticulate Lubber Grasshopper

Dear David,
We identified your Reticulate Lubber Grasshopper,
Taeniopoda reticulata, thank to iNaturalist where it states:  “These brightly colored lubber grasshoppers were observed at several areas in the region, but they were not seen in the rainforests, swamps, or along the sandy beaches, although they could be found on the periphery of these areas where grasses were likely to grow. Nymphs were never found in regions without patches of the Hymenocallis lily.”  We also located a FlickR image.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Central FL
Date: 07/27/2019
Time: 11:53 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Is this an echo moth?
How you want your letter signed:  Nora

Echo Moth

Dear Nora,
This is indeed an Echo Moth,
Seirarctia echo, a species of Tiger Moth in the subfamily Arctiinae, which we identified on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide the range is “GA south through FL, west through MS.”

Thank you so much! We had an infestation of the echo moth caterpillars last summer and they almost wiped out my cycads before I noticed them. This is the first time I’ve seen the moth itself. Beautiful to look at but not a friend of my garden.
Do you have any suggestions for controlling them in the future?
Thank you again for such a quick response.

Sorry, we do not provide extermination advice.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Some kind of fly?
Geographic location of the bug:  Huntsville, Alabama
Date: 07/27/2019
Time: 04:58 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  We found this bug on our windshield this afternoon. It took quite a ride with us. It did recover and fly away. We’r thought it looked kind of like a big horse fly, about the diameter of a 50 cent coin in length, except for the stripes and pointy abdomen.  Thank you for letting us know what it is!
How you want your letter signed:  Rex and Elizabeth

Red Footed Cannibalfly

Dear Rex and Elizabeth,
This large, predatory Robber Fly is commonly called a Red Footed Cannibalfly, and your request is the first submission we have received this year.  We typically post at least five images of Red Footed Cannibalflies each summer.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  I can’t find this on inaturalist
Geographic location of the bug:  Arizona/Sonoran border
Date: 07/27/2019
Time: 01:09 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  @ Coronado after a couple of rains.
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/29543844
About 2inches long.Can Fly
BTW, how come I can’t sign in no more?
How you want your letter signed: ptosis

Apache Click Beetle

Dear ptosis,
This gorgeous beetle is an Apache Click Beetle,
Chalcolepidius apacheanus, which we identified on BugGuide.  When we posted images of this strikingly beautiful beetle long ago, we pondered the lack of a common name on BugGuide at the time, and we proposed Apache Click Beetle as the common name based on its existing scientific name.  We don’t understand your question:  “BTW, how come I can’t sign in no more?”  Please clarify.

Apache Click Beetle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Red and black striped stink bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Montenegro
Date: 07/26/2019
Time: 07:04 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Thought you might like to know we found this guy in Montenegro Kotor Bay
How you want your letter signed:  Frangipanimoonflower

Striped Bug

Dear Frangipanimoonflower,
According to iNaturalist, this boldly colored and marked Stink Bug,
Graphosoma lineatum, is commonly called a Striped Bug or Minstrel Bug.  The site states:  “The orange and black warning colours (aposematism) indicate that the insects are foul-tasting, protecting them from predators. The nymphs do not have the orange-black stripe pattern, instead they are mostly brownish.”

Ed. Note:  We thought we needed to do additional research on the name Minstrel Bug, and we have decided upon further reflection to change the name of both the subject line of this posting and the caption on the image to Striped Bug.  A minstrel is, according to Merriam-Webster:  “one of a class of medieval musical entertainers especially : a singer of verses to the accompaniment of a harp wandering minstrels,”  but a more recent meaning entered the language with this definition:  “a member of a type of performance troupe caricaturing black performers that originated in the U.S. in the early 19th century.  NOTE: The acts of minstrels, who typically performed in blackface, featured exaggerated and inaccurate representations of black people in songs, dances, and comic dialogue. The popularity of minstrel shows in their heyday played a significant role in promoting negative racial stereotypes. Professional minstrel shows had fallen out of favor and effectively disappeared by the mid-20th century.”  What really interested us was how the black and red stripes of the Striped Bug related to minstrel costumes, and our initial searching located this image with a fascinating reversal of a racially insensitive representation of the other on the National Carnival Commission of Trinidad and Tobago where this statement is posted:  “Minstrel of old sang plantation songs and other American songs like ‘Swanee River’ and dressed in a variety of costumes e.g. Uncle Sam tailcoat, pinstripe trousers, white gloves and felt top hat.”  To add further confusion to the common name Minstrel Bug, this insect is European, and we can’t imagine how a decidedly American negative stereotype came to be used for the name of a European insect.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Yellow Beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  Bismarck, ND
Date: 07/25/2019
Time: 07:24 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  The stripes are dark blue and hisses when disturbed. About 1/4” long.
How you want your letter signed:  R. Green

Three Lined Potato Beetle

Dear R. Green,
This looks to us like a Three Lined Potato Beetle,
Lema daturaphila, which is pictured on BugGuide.  There is no mention on BugGuide of stridulation, which is the hissing sound you heard the beetle make by rubbing together parts of its body.  This comment “I remember the first time I heard them squeaking like little birds when I picked them up” appears on another BugGuide posting.

Thank you so much! It does make chirps and squeaks and small hisses. It’s a strange little thing!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination