From the monthly archives: "June 2019"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Virginia
Date: 06/28/2019
Time: 09:46 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this moth on the front steps of my house I think that it is a IO moth
How you want your letter signed:  I do not care

Male Io Moth

This is a male Io Moth and your request was perfectly timed as we just finished posting an image of a sexually dimorphic, brown, female Io Moth.  The overall color of males is yellow while the upper wings of the female Io Moth is brown.  Both female and male Io Moths have distinctive eyespots on the underwings. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Northern lower Michigan, near traverse City
Date: 06/28/2019
Time: 12:54 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found this next to my door when I got home around 5pm on a hot, humid day. My best guess is some type of sallow moth, but I’m lost and curious.
How you want your letter signed:  AJ

Female Io Moth

Dear AJ,
This is a female Io Moth and in her current resting position, she is hiding her most distinctive features, the eyespots on her underwings.  When startled by a predator, she reveals the eyespots, potentially frightening a predator into thinking it has awakened a sleeping giant.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  2 inch beetle Bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Bernardsville NJ
Date: 06/28/2019
Time: 06:33 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Here’s a photo- what is it?
How you want your letter signed:  Nancy

Female Broad Necked Root Borer

Dear Nancy,
This is a female Broad Necked Root Borer,
Prionus laticollis, and what appears to be a stinger is actually an ovipositor, an organ used during the egg laying process.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Caterpillar identification request
Geographic location of the bug:  Redmond, WA
Date: 06/28/2019
Time: 06:00 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found this on a local street.Any idea what type of caterpillar this is? Thanks!
How you want your letter signed:  Don

Elm Sawfly larva

Dear Don,
Though it resembles a Caterpillar, the Elm Sawfly larva,
Cimbex americana, is actually a member of the insect order that includes Wasps and Bees.

Thank you so much! Really appreciate your knowledge!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is it?
Geographic location of the bug:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
Date: 06/28/2019
Time: 08:09 AM PDT
Your letter to the bugman:  3legged.  Focus is a bit off. its foot closest us looks good.
How you want your letter signed:  Chris Howard

Thread-Legged Bug

Hi Chris,
This is a Thread Legged Bug, an Assassin Bug in the subfamily Emesinae, and it is a beneficial predator.  It actually does have six legs if you look closely.  Four rear legs are used for walking, and projecting out in front of the two antennae are the pair of raptorial front legs that are used to capture prey.  Here is a BugGuide image for comparison.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Moths
Geographic location of the bug:  New Hampshire
Date: 06/28/2019
Time: 02:26 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I have a big yellow moth in my room that has a wing spanned of about an inch.
Its all yellow and has brown/tan spots on it.
Its very beautiful and i want to know what it si before it leaves.
How you want your letter signed:  James

Probably False Crocus Geometer

Dear James,
This is a Measuring Worm Moth or Geometer in the family Geometridae, and that name comes from the movement pattern of the caterpillars, called Inchworms or Measuring Worms.  We believe your individual is a False Crocus Geometer based on images and the range map on the Moth Photographers Group.  As you can see, the spotting pattern on the wings is quite variable.  The species is also pictured on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination