From the monthly archives: "April 2019"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Great Peacock moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Conflans-Sainte-Honorine, 78700, France
Date: 04/24/2019
Time: 04:47 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  As per my message on the forum. Thank you very much for checking it out.
How you want your letter signed:  Jane

Great Peacock Moth

Hi Jane,
Thanks for sending in your tragic images of a female Great Peacock Moth,
Saturnia pyri, that has become a roadkill victim.  The comment you placed on one of our prior postings reads:  “This is not for the faint-hearted I’m afraid, but I’ve just taken a couple of photos of a massive, and magnificent, but unfortunately dead moth I just found on the road. I’m 100% sure it’s a Great Peacock moth, but I seem to live much further North of their reported range.”  According to Saturniidae of the Western Palaearctic, the Great Peacock Moth is:  “Limited to the warmer areas of Europe and the Near East, from Paris, France (Leraut, 2017), south through western Switzerland, the Iberian Peninsular to costal regions of Morocco and Algeria. Thence eastwards across Austria, Hungary, the Balkans to the Ukraine. From here it extends southwards across the Caucasus Mountains, the Republic of Georgia, Armenia, and Azerbaijan (Zolotuhin, Didmanidze & Petrov, 2011) to Turkey, Syria, Lebanon, Israel and the Alborz and Zagros Mountains of Iran. It is also found on the Mediterranean islands of Corsica and Sardinia, but not Crete.  It now appears to be extinct in northern France (north of Paris), Germany and Luxembourg.”  Its presence might be due to a reintroduction effort, or perhaps global warming is causing it to expand its range into regions from which it had been previously extirpated.

Great Peacock Moth

Hello Daniel
Thank you for taking the time to respond to my message, and confirming my identification.
I’ll try to find a local wildlife group/entomologist as I think it may be of interest to them. Such a pity the poor thing was dead, but at least I’ve been able to report the sighting.
Thanks again for your kind help.
Best regards
Jane

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What’s this jumping spider
Geographic location of the bug:  Louisville Ky USA
Date: 04/17/2019
Time: 06:28 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello, can you id this tiny jumper for me? About sesame seed size, found on mailbox in Louisville Ky onApril 17, 2019. Thank you
How you want your letter signed:  Shelby

Jumping Spider

Dear Shelby,
We are posting your image of a Jumping Spider in the family Salticidae, though we did not manage to quickly identify it.  Perhaps one of our readers will write in with a proper species identification.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Mexican beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  Cima de Tepozteco
Date: 04/19/2019
Time: 11:46 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Looking to identify this photographed by a friend. Apparently known as escarabajo but I’m guessing that’s a generic name for several beetles.
How you want your letter signed:  Cliff

Giant Mexquite Bug nymph

Dear Cliff,
This is not a Beetle.  It is a Giant Mesquite Bug nymph, and they are frequently found feeding in groups.

Hi Daniel
Thank you very much for your prompt reply and identification. Please excuse my basic ignorance of what is a beetle or not.
A friend of mine took that photo, and from a British perspective, it looks very unusual. Several of us will be glad to know.
Best wishes
Cliff

No problem Cliff.  That is why we are still here after 17 years.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Pond Pupa?
Geographic location of the bug:  Connecticut
Date: 04/24/2019
Time: 03:05 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Good afternooon,
These little guys move with a jerking movement, are about 2mm in length, inhabit the water about 6-18 inches below the surface and are so numerous that it’s hard to believe.
How you want your letter signed:  Dylan

Water Fleas

Dear Dylan,
These are freshwater Crustaceans in the genus
Daphnia, commonly called Water Fleas because of the way they move through the water in a “jerking movement.”  Daphnia are a common live food used by many enthusiasts to feed aquarium fish.  You can find matching images on An Image-Based Key to the Zooplankton of North America and there is a nice drawing on Researchgate.  According to the National Center for Biotechnology Information:  “The genus Daphnia includes more than 100 known species of freshwater plankton organisms found around the world … They inhabit most types of standing freshwater except for extreme habitats, such as hot springs. All age classes are good swimmers and are mostly pelagic, i.e., found in the open water. They live as filter feeders, but some species may frequently be seen clinging to substrates such as water plants or even browsing over the bottom sediments of shallow ponds. Adults range from less than 1 mm to 5 mm in size, with the smaller species typically found in ponds or lakes with fish predation. The ecology of the genus Daphnia may be better known than the ecology of any other group of organisms.”

Water Fleas

Thank you!
You all are amazing, I really appreciate it!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  It looks like Lucas the Singing Spider
Geographic location of the bug:  Livingston Parish, Louisiana
Date: 04/20/2019
Time: 05:32 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  My daughter and I found this cute little guy on our siding. All of him could fit on a dime without falling off. Any clue what species he is? I THINK jes a jumper but I’m not sure. His fur is what caught my eye. He literally turned and watched us both to see us from different angles. He was just as curious about us as we were of him.
How you want your letter signed:  Jackie and Sophie

Bold Jumper we believe

Dear Jackie and Sophie,
This is indeed a Jumping Spider in the family Salticidae, and as you observed, they have excellent eyesight.  Because of the green chelicerae, we believe this is a Bold Jumper,
Phidippus audax.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Bee
Geographic location of the bug:  California
Date: 04/22/2019
Time: 07:21 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Bee
How you want your letter signed:  What kind of bee

Hover Fly

This is not a Bee.  It is a Hover Fly or Flower Fly in the family Syrphidae, a group that includes many members that mimic stinging Bees and Wasps for protection as the Hover Flies neither sting nor bite, and they benefit from being mistaken by predators for stinging insects.  We identified your individual as Eristalinus taeniops on The Natural History of Orange County.  The gap between the eyes on your individual identifies her as female.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination