From the monthly archives: "April 2019"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Green spider
Geographic location of the bug:  Pensacola Florida
Date: 04/25/2019
Time: 08:23 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Sitting at the dog park watching my pup chase squirrels and this little guy landed on bench next to me.  Very cool looking but I don’t think I’ve ever seen one like it here on the gulf coast.  Any idea what kind of spider this is?
How you want your letter signed:  Cristal

Magnolia Green Jumper

Dear Cristal,
The Magnolia Green Jumper is a vividly green, native species, and you can verify its identity thanks to this BugGuide image.  Like other Jumping Spiders in the family Salticidae, the Magnolia Green Jumper is considered harmless to humans, hunts its prey rather than building a web to snare prey, and has excellent eyesight.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Black and yellow-orange beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  Gainesville, Florida, USA
Date: 04/25/2019
Time: 10:17 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This little beetle was found by my friend, and neither of us can identify it.  It’s approximately 5mm long and was found on a bean-like plant.
How you want your letter signed:  RobynB.

Leaf Beetle

Dear Robyn B.,
This is a Leaf Beetle in the family Chrysomelidae.  We located this image of
Lema solani on BugGuide that looks like a match to us, but it feeds on members of the nightshade family, not on beans.

Dear Daniel,
Thank you SO much for your help- we looked in many books and sites but couldn’t identify it.  You’re wonderful!!
Thanks so much,
Robyn
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What type of moth is this?
Geographic location of the bug:  Northeast GA mountain foothills bordering Chattahoochee National Forest.  Elevation about 1500’.
Date: 04/26/2019
Time: 01:02 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I spotted this moth 4/25/19 on an outside wall of house not far from a nighttime security light.  The edge of the retracted wings looked like a profile of a snake head or a fish head complete with an eye & scales. On the wing closer to the body there was a perfect replica of college football’s Texas Longhorn symbol, color & all.  The body & feet looked like a hugely engorged giant tick.
How you want your letter signed:  Thank you for identifying & providing any info on this moth, as well as it’s caterpillar stage, Steve.

Tulip-Tree Silkmoth, we believe

Dear Steve,
We believe your Giant Silkmoth is a Tulip-Tree Silkmoth,
Callosamia angulifera, based on this BugGuide image, though there are several closely related species that look similar that are also found in Georgia.  BugGuide also has images of its caterpillar.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Elongated bug in old pool water
Geographic location of the bug:  West central Alabama
Date: 04/26/2019
Time: 07:00 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I’ve began seeing these segmented, elongated bugs for the first time this year (beginning about March, when weather got warm) in the foot of nasty pool water left in our above ground pool. They swim leisurely, but can also dart very quickly.
How you want your letter signed:  Amanda In Alabama

Water Tiger

Dear Amanda in Alabama,
This is a Water Tiger, the aquatic larva of a Predaceous Diving Beetle.  Water Tigers are efficient predators that eat small aquatic insects and invertebrates as well as small fish and tadpoles.  Here is an image from Insects of Alberta.

Water Tiger

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Yet another Goldsmith “Bug” !
Geographic location of the bug:  Gloucester, Va
Date: 04/26/2019
Time: 03:38 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I wrote you back in 2015 when I found my 1st Goldsmith beetle. I have since found at least 1 or 2 each year in the same location… My garage!  Of course they are always moved to safety in the backyard, just as this one that I found today has been.  Just thought I’d share another picture of this glorious find!
How you want your letter signed:  Holly G

Goldsmith Beetle

Dear Holly G,
How wonderful to hear about your yearly Goldsmith Beetle sightings, though we have not been able to locate your 2015 request in our archives.  Because of your “catch and release” policy, we are tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

Goldsmith Beetle

Wonderful! Thank you so much!!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  large moth
Geographic location of the bug:  High Point, North Carolina
Date: 04/26/2019
Time: 12:59 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I’d like to identify this large moth I saw sitting on a piece of lawn furniture outside yesterday
How you want your letter signed:  Weremonkey

Polyphemus Moth

Dear Weremonkey,
Congratulations on your Polyphemus Moth sighting.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination