From the monthly archives: "April 2019"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Large  Moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Arlington TX
Date: 03/31/2019
Time: 11:29 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi! I found a large brown moth with something that looks like eyes on the wings. It been by my front door for over 24 hours. It is very weird with a furry like head and legs like spiders. Is it dangerous and where did it come from? Thanks!
How you want your letter signed:  Minnie Moore

Polyphemus Moth

Dear Minnie Moore,
This is a female Polyphemus Moth, which was named after the one-eyed cyclops of mythology, but we have always pondered why a moth with two large eyespots would be named after a one eyed giant.  Perhaps it is because when the moth is startled and reveals its eyespots to frighten a predator, it begins by only revealing one spot, winking at its attacker in an effort to startle the predator into perceiving that it has awoken a sleeping giant that might in fact “eat” the predator.

Very interesting!
It’s still on the side of the house since Saturday, but moved up some. Is something going on with it? We thought it would have flown away by now. No one wants to disturb “her”.
Thank you so much!
Minnie

Hi again Minnie,
Giant Silkmoths do not feed as adults, so they do not waste energy by flying unnecessarily.  She may be waiting to attract a mate before she flies off to lay eggs.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination