From the monthly archives: "January 2019"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Tiny little bugs
Geographic location of the bug:  South jersey
Date: 01/08/2019
Time: 09:59 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi, I noticed these tiny little black dots that move in my hot tub. Next day I see a ton of them by the door entrance to my house on the outside towards the deck.
One picture is of a bunch of them, the next one is cropped with just one.
How you want your letter signed:  Mark

Globular Springtails

Dear Mark,
These appear to be Globular Springtails, benign creatures that often become a nuisance when they appear in large numbers.  Interestingly, we just finished posting another inquiry regarding Globular Springtails, that also originated in New Jersey. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Bugs
Geographic location of the bug:  Jackson,  New Jersey USA
Date: 01/08/2019
Time: 05:07 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi! Its currently 45° here in NJ,  I dont understand how I have these tiny bugs all over the side of my garage and all over my deck. I cant tell if they fly or just move really fast but its freaking me out! Help! Do I need to call someone to spray? Thanks ! -Katy
How you want your letter signed:  Katy

Globular Springtail

Dear Katy,
This is a Globular Springtail, a benign creature that might become a nuisance if it is too plentiful.  They tend to proliferate when conditions are ideal, and then they seemingly vanish.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unidentified Flying Insect
Geographic location of the bug:  Gauteng South Africa
Date: 01/22/2019
Time: 02:07 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi.
I found this beautiful insect on our patio upstairs close to a light source at night.
Any idea what it might be?
It doesn’t look like a Dragonfly though.
How you want your letter signed:  Damian

Antlion

Dear Damian,
Though it resembles a Dragonfly, this gorgeous insect is actually an Antlion, and it is more closely related to Lacewings and Owlflies.  We believe it is
Palpares speciosus, a species that is pictured on iSpot.

Antlion

Thank you so much for the info!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unknown Bug Found While Hiking
Geographic location of the bug:  Gatlinburg, TN
Date: 01/21/2019
Time: 08:35 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi,
I was walking along the Fighting Creek Nature Trail near the Sugarlands Visitor Center outside of Gatlinburg, TN when I saw this bug. I’ve tried googling it but can’t seem to find a match. Any idea what it is?
Thanks!
How you want your letter signed:  Matt

One Spotted Tiger Beetle:  Apterodela unipunctata

Dear Matt,
This is a predatory Tiger Beetle, and many species have metallic green coloration, so we decided to search BugGuide for a Black Tiger Beetle and quickly identified it as
Cicindelidia punctulata thanks to this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide:  “Overwinters as larva, adults present in summer. One- or two-year life cycle” which makes your January sighting quite unusual.  BugGuide data lists April sightings in Florida as the earliest sightings of the year, and most other states only report sightings from May to October.  Perhaps you took this image last summer?

Daniel,
Wow! Awesome – thank you so much!
And yes, you’re absolutely right it was taken last summer (late June)
Thanks again!
Best,
Matt

March 14, 2019a:  Correction and Comment from Timothy P Friedlander.
This is actually a very interesting tiger beetle, Apterodela unipunctata, and a good find. They are most active in late May, through June, into July, and prefer sandy woods. They seem to be mostly nocturnal, and less active in the day, and frequently “play dead” when disturbed. They resemble fast, black spiders as they run through the forest litter, and will hide under leaves.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Mud Wasps?
Geographic location of the bu:  Sadleir NSW
Date: 01/21/2019
Time: 09:27 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi the wasps in the pic are living on my clothes line can u please tell me if they are mud wasps n what kind? Also if they are aggressive how can i remove them in a manner safe for me and them?
How you want your letter signed:  Yours Sincerely Lori Jenkins

Paper Wasp Nest

Dear Lori,
This appears to be a Paper Wasp nest, probably from the genus
Polistes.  According to the Brisbane Insect site:  “There are different species of Paper Wasps. Those wasps in genus Polistes build inverted mushroom-shaped. They build rather small paper combs nest suspended from a peduncle and not surrounded by an envelope. … They are dark brown in colour with yellow bends on dark brown abdomen. The thorax is black in colour with yellow ‘V’ markings. Their faces are yellow with large compound eyes.” Your image is rather dark and lacking detail, so we would not rule out the genus Ropalidia which is also pictured on the Brisbane Insect site.  Paper Wasps are social wasps that will defend the nest against attack by stinging, and some species might be more aggressive than others, but when they do not feel the nest is threatened, they are quite docile.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What bug is this
Geographic location of the bug:  Randburg
Date: 01/18/2019
Time: 02:02 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi there
I have these bugs crawling on and around my front wall, including the electricity meter. Are they Soapberry or Cotton Stainer bugs, or something completely different? Are they hazardous to the garden or pets, and how best would you recommend getting rid of them, or preventing them? Thanks
How you want your letter signed:  Gareth, Randburg

Cotton Stainers

Dear Gareth,
Is Randburg in South Africa?  In our opinion, these are Cotton Stainers in the genus 
Dysdercus.  They might be Dysdercus nigrofasciatus which is pictured on FlickR, or possibly Dysdercus fasciatus which is pictured on Project Noah.  There are reported to be several similar looking species in South Africa.  We do not provide extermination advice.

Cotton Stainers

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination